Fox Searchlight Pictures | Release Date: November 5, 2010
8.1
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Universal acclaim based on 620 Ratings
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547
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Negative:
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8
TheArchetypesSep 9, 2016
Surely one of the best films of the year, Boyle's effort I believe is a triumphant and revolutionary new take in film of a person that is in complete solitude, an upbeat soundtrack and by blending fear, tension, and humour all into one. ISurely one of the best films of the year, Boyle's effort I believe is a triumphant and revolutionary new take in film of a person that is in complete solitude, an upbeat soundtrack and by blending fear, tension, and humour all into one. I think that probably what is the most moving though is that this film is able to take hold of you and when you're let go in the end; the only thing you can think of is that you are just glad to be alive. Expand
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7
SpangleAug 12, 2016
127 Hours is a truly inspirational tale of survival with a phenomenal performance from James Franco taking centerstage. Certainly a Danny Boyle film, he creates this environment of despair, regret, and claustrophobia, that keeps you on edge127 Hours is a truly inspirational tale of survival with a phenomenal performance from James Franco taking centerstage. Certainly a Danny Boyle film, he creates this environment of despair, regret, and claustrophobia, that keeps you on edge and damn near hesitant to see what comes next in this truly distressing film. The film is well shot and incredibly well-written, as it is able to create interest from such a seemingly simple premise, while expertly balancing his being stuck and his past to create a well-rounded look at Aron Ralston. The film is a good length too and really is as long as it needs to be, as it is well paced and utilizes its runtime to perfection. Unfortunately, the infamous sequence in which he cuts off his arm is just too much. Traumatic to watch, the film seems to be under the belief that the audience needs to nearly pass out and watch every detail of him cutting off his arm in order to understand he is cutting off his arm. Cheap and silly, this sequence really ruins what was a very good film. As it stands, it is still pretty good, but not nearly where it could have been. Overall, if 127 Hours could hold itself back and not be so disgustingly gory and graphic, it could have been better. If you actually like watching a guy cut off his arm, boy do I have the movie for you. For others, skip over that part and stick around for this truly incredible tale of survival with a very human center. Expand
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9
Muskrat147Jul 15, 2016
Well paced, tensely directed, and wonderfully acted, 127 Hours makes the most out of its confined setting, and uses James Franco's one-of-a-kind performance to deliver a unique survival story.
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9
Jack97May 6, 2016
Impeccably made and truly inspirational, 127 Hours manages to tell the story of one man trapped in one place for six days without it being boring or feeling too long. Instead it is interesting and occasionally intense and very well acted byImpeccably made and truly inspirational, 127 Hours manages to tell the story of one man trapped in one place for six days without it being boring or feeling too long. Instead it is interesting and occasionally intense and very well acted by James Franco. Expand
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8
MovieMasterEddyApr 3, 2016
Danny Boyle has taken us to the surface of the sun (“Sunshine”) and the end of the world as we know it (“28 Days Later”), testing the limits of human endurance with each radically different project. “127 Hours” takes the adrenaline rush oneDanny Boyle has taken us to the surface of the sun (“Sunshine”) and the end of the world as we know it (“28 Days Later”), testing the limits of human endurance with each radically different project. “127 Hours” takes the adrenaline rush one step further, pitting man against nature in the most elemental of struggles as Boyle compresses the true story of rock-climbing junkie Aron Ralston, who spent five days wrestling with a boulder after a rockslide pinned his arm against a canyon wall, into an intense 93 minutes.

On paper, “127 Hours” would seem to buck convention on multiple fronts: The film revolves around a single actor (James Franco) stuck in one location (“Between a Rock and a Hard Place,” to borrow the title of Ralston’s memoir) for most of its running time, and though it packs an uplifting ending, that emotional victory comes at the expense of the hero’s right arm — depicted in a gruesome climax that caused a number of people to faint at the film’s premiere in Telluride (located just three hours from Bluejohn Canyon, Utah, where the events took place).

Blatantly noncommercial elements aside, Boyle and co-writer Simon Beaufoy (“Slumdog Millionaire”) have managed to craft quite an accessible film after all, opening up the action with a sexy prologue featuring two lost hikers (Kate Mara and Amber Tamblyn, whose carefree early scenes would feel right at home in Boyle’s “The Beach”) and using several hallucinatory visions drawn directly from Ralston’s book, all the better to re-create his frame of mind at the time — a task that relies on two cinematographers, Anthony Dod Mantle and Enrique Chediak, to achieve the film’s gorgeous supersaturated look.

While Franco can sometimes be a wild card, getting increasingly self-conscious with recent roles (most notably his guest-starring stunt on “General Hospital”), his take on Ralston feels both credible and compelling; few actors could have made us care so much, or disappeared so completely into the role. With very little time to establish the young man’s backstory, Franco uses his Method acting technique to slip into Ralston’s skin, making it that much easier for us to vicariously do the same. We “get” him instantly, thanks in part to an energetic opening montage, spread across three rapidly changing screens and cut to Free Blood’s “Never Hear Surf Music Again,” that places the young engineering student’s interest in the outdoors within the broader American phenomenon of extreme sports. Ralston may be rather reckless, flipping his bike and so forth on his way to the canyon, but he knows what he’s doing, and the accident wasn’t necessarily his fault: While he was testing his weight on a loose chockstone, the rock gave way and crushed him beneath it.

Over the course of the next hour, Ralston will cycle through all five stages of grief (with “acceptance” ultimately being the decision to remove his arm), while making room for some serious soul-searching. Ralston replays memories of his family, an intimate night shared with g.f. Megan (Clemence Poesy) and his eventual breakup — all serving to interrupt the monotony of dehydration and helplessness. As the days pass, his visions become more vivid and abstract — one day he hosts an unsettling gameshow-like monologue with himself, complete with laugh track, the next he dreams of a harrowing flash flood — before culminating in a fateful premonition.

Just as director Rodrigo Cortes did in the recent stuck-in-a-coffin thriller “Buried,” Boyle constantly repositions the camera to help dispel the potential claustrophobia of it all, sometimes pulling weird trick shots (such as the straw’s-eye view of Ralston’s dwindling water supply). Since the real Ralston brought a camcorder along on the hike, the film treats some of the footage as if the character were documenting the situation himself, letting the writers get away with a fair amount of explanatory dialogue, along with the occasional tension-breaking one-liner.

As nerve-racking as the whole predicament is, it’s surprising how much humor manages to sneak in, with A.R. Rahman’s Western-sounding synthpop score building from tension to ultimate triumph (with a boost from the original Dido collaboration “If I Rise”). Many will come out of sheer curiosity about Ralston’s self-administered amputation (whether or not they manage to keep their eyes open during the scene itself), but the scenes that follow are even more effective, right up to the closing images of the real Ralston, still chasing the adrenaline dream.
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8
DoctorFilmMar 30, 2016
Danny Boyle has taken us to the surface of the sun (“Sunshine”) and the end of the world as we know it (“28 Days Later”), testing the limits of human endurance with each radically different project. “127 Hours” takes the adrenaline rush oneDanny Boyle has taken us to the surface of the sun (“Sunshine”) and the end of the world as we know it (“28 Days Later”), testing the limits of human endurance with each radically different project. “127 Hours” takes the adrenaline rush one step further, pitting man against nature in the most elemental of struggles as Boyle compresses the true story of rock-climbing junkie Aron Ralston, who spent five days wrestling with a boulder after a rockslide pinned his arm against a canyon wall, into an intense 93 minutes.

single actor (James Franco) stuck in one location (“Between a Rock and a Hard Place,” to borrow the title of Ralston’s memoir) for most of its running time, and though it packs an uplifting ending, that emotional victory comes at the expense of the hero’s right arm — depicted in a gruesome climax that caused a number of people to faint at the film’s premiere in Telluride (located just three hours from Bluejohn Canyon, Utah, where the events took place).

Blatantly noncommercial elements aside, Boyle and co-writer Simon Beaufoy (“Slumdog Millionaire”) have managed to craft quite an accessible film after all, opening up the action with a sexy prologue featuring two lost hikers (Kate Mara and Amber Tamblyn, whose carefree early scenes would feel right at home in Boyle’s “The Beach”) and using several hallucinatory visions drawn directly from Ralston’s book, all the better to re-create his frame of mind at the time — a task that relies on two cinematographers, Anthony Dod Mantle and Enrique Chediak, to achieve the film’s gorgeous supersaturated look.

While Franco can sometimes be a wild card, getting increasingly self-conscious with recent roles (most notably his guest-starring stunt on “General Hospital”), his take on Ralston feels both credible and compelling; few actors could have made us care so much, or disappeared so completely into the role. With very little time to establish the young man’s backstory, Franco uses his Method acting technique to slip into Ralston’s skin, making it that much easier for us to vicariously do the same. We “get” him instantly, thanks in part to an energetic opening montage, spread across three rapidly changing screens and cut to Free Blood’s “Never Hear Surf Music Again,” that places the young engineering student’s interest in the outdoors within the broader American phenomenon of extreme sports. Ralston may be rather reckless, flipping his bike and so forth on his way to the canyon, but he knows what he’s doing, and the accident wasn’t necessarily his fault: While he was testing his weight on a loose chockstone, the rock gave way and crushed him beneath it.

Over the course of the next hour, Ralston will cycle through all five stages of grief (with “acceptance” ultimately being the decision to remove his arm), while making room for some serious soul-searching. Ralston replays memories of his family, an intimate night shared with g.f. Megan (Clemence Poesy) and his eventual breakup — all serving to interrupt the monotony of dehydration and helplessness. As the days pass, his visions become more vivid and abstract — one day he hosts an unsettling gameshow-like monologue with himself, complete with laugh track, the next he dreams of a harrowing flash flood — before culminating in a fateful premonition.

Just as director Rodrigo Cortes did in the recent stuck-in-a-coffin thriller “Buried,” Boyle constantly repositions the camera to help dispel the potential claustrophobia of it all, sometimes pulling weird trick shots (such as the straw’s-eye view of Ralston’s dwindling water supply). Since the real Ralston brought a camcorder along on the hike, the film treats some of the footage as if the character were documenting the situation himself, letting the writers get away with a fair amount of explanatory dialogue, along with the occasional tension-breaking one-liner.

As nerve-racking as the whole predicament is, it’s surprising how much humor manages to sneak in, with A.R. Rahman’s Western-sounding synthpop score building from tension to ultimate triumph (with a boost from the original Dido collaboration “If I Rise”). Many will come out of sheer curiosity about Ralston’s self-administered amputation (whether or not they manage to keep their eyes open during the scene itself), but the scenes that follow are even more effective, right up to the closing images of the real Ralston, still chasing the adrenaline dream.
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9
TheFilmDoctorMar 22, 2016
Danny Boyle has taken us to the surface of the sun (“Sunshine”) and the end of the world as we know it (“28 Days Later”), testing the limits of human endurance with each radically different project. “127 Hours” takes the adrenaline rush oneDanny Boyle has taken us to the surface of the sun (“Sunshine”) and the end of the world as we know it (“28 Days Later”), testing the limits of human endurance with each radically different project. “127 Hours” takes the adrenaline rush one step further, pitting man against nature in the most elemental of struggles as Boyle compresses the true story of rock-climbing junkie Aron Ralston, who spent five days wrestling with a boulder after a rockslide pinned his arm against a canyon wall, into an intense 93 minutes. Marketed correctly, pic should spell another hit for the high-energy helmer.

On paper, “127 Hours” would seem to buck convention on multiple fronts: The film revolves around a single actor (James Franco) stuck in one location (“Between a Rock and a Hard Place,” to borrow the title of Ralston’s memoir) for most of its running time, and though it packs an uplifting ending, that emotional victory comes at the expense of the hero’s right arm — depicted in a gruesome climax that caused a number of people to faint at the film’s premiere in Telluride (located just three hours from Bluejohn Canyon, Utah, where the events took place).

Blatantly noncommercial elements aside, Boyle and co-writer Simon Beaufoy (“Slumdog Millionaire”) have managed to craft quite an accessible film after all, opening up the action with a sexy prologue featuring two lost hikers (Kate Mara and Amber Tamblyn, whose carefree early scenes would feel right at home in Boyle’s “The Beach”) and using several hallucinatory visions drawn directly from Ralston’s book, all the better to re-create his frame of mind at the time — a task that relies on two cinematographers, Anthony Dod Mantle and Enrique Chediak, to achieve the film’s gorgeous supersaturated look.

While Franco can sometimes be a wild card, getting increasingly self-conscious with recent roles (most notably his guest-starring stunt on “General Hospital”), his take on Ralston feels both credible and compelling; few actors could have made us care so much, or disappeared so completely into the role. With very little time to establish the young man’s backstory, Franco uses his Method acting technique to slip into Ralston’s skin, making it that much easier for us to vicariously do the same. We “get” him instantly, thanks in part to an energetic opening montage, spread across three rapidly changing screens and cut to Free Blood’s “Never Hear Surf Music Again,” that places the young engineering student’s interest in the outdoors within the broader American phenomenon of extreme sports. Ralston may be rather reckless, flipping his bike and so forth on his way to the canyon, but he knows what he’s doing, and the accident wasn’t necessarily his fault: While he was testing his weight on a loose chockstone, the rock gave way and crushed him beneath it.

Over the course of the next hour, Ralston will cycle through all five stages of grief (with “acceptance” ultimately being the decision to remove his arm), while making room for some serious soul-searching. Ralston replays memories of his family, an intimate night shared with g.f. Megan (Clemence Poesy) and his eventual breakup — all serving to interrupt the monotony of dehydration and helplessness. As the days pass, his visions become more vivid and abstract — one day he hosts an unsettling gameshow-like monologue with himself, complete with laugh track, the next he dreams of a harrowing flash flood — before culminating in a fateful premonition.

Just as director Rodrigo Cortes did in the recent stuck-in-a-coffin thriller “Buried,” Boyle constantly repositions the camera to help dispel the potential claustrophobia of it all, sometimes pulling weird trick shots (such as the straw’s-eye view of Ralston’s dwindling water supply). Since the real Ralston brought a camcorder along on the hike, the film treats some of the footage as if the character were documenting the situation himself, letting the writers get away with a fair amount of explanatory dialogue, along with the occasional tension-breaking one-liner.

As nerve-racking as the whole predicament is, it’s surprising how much humor manages to sneak in, with A.R. Rahman’s Western-sounding synthpop score building from tension to ultimate triumph (with a boost from the original Dido collaboration “If I Rise”). Many will come out of sheer curiosity about Ralston’s self-administered amputation (whether or not they manage to keep their eyes open during the scene itself), but the scenes that follow are even more effective, right up to the closing images of the real Ralston, still chasing the adrenaline dream.
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7
BrandonBonaseraMar 8, 2016
127 Hours is intense and claustrophobic with great performances, however I feel the film did not captivate me as much as it should have. But overall, I thought 127 Hours was a decent film and worth the watch.
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8
Berry-TanJan 12, 2016
127 Hours asks a big question of its audience: could you do what Aron Ralston does when it came down to it?
It's chilling, claustrophobic, even nerve-racking, but it's also one of the most fascinating films of the year. You'll feel like
127 Hours asks a big question of its audience: could you do what Aron Ralston does when it came down to it?
It's chilling, claustrophobic, even nerve-racking, but it's also one of the most fascinating films of the year. You'll feel like you're clenching everything in your body as this movie builds towards its inevitable climax, but this is a masterful work...
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9
WJSJan 9, 2016
Stunning cinematography, brilliant direction, clever editing and an absolutely bravo performance from James Franco, help to make this intense, claustrophobic tale of survival nearly perfect. It makes you realize that you should probablyStunning cinematography, brilliant direction, clever editing and an absolutely bravo performance from James Franco, help to make this intense, claustrophobic tale of survival nearly perfect. It makes you realize that you should probably always take a buddy when you go on a hike. Expand
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8
ydnar4Jul 27, 2015
127 Hours is without a doubt the best performance by James Franco and he has failed to come close to matching it sine. The film feels very real and there are even points where you can feel the claustrophobia starting to come on. There are127 Hours is without a doubt the best performance by James Franco and he has failed to come close to matching it sine. The film feels very real and there are even points where you can feel the claustrophobia starting to come on. There are some points in the film that are a little gross but it all adds to the realism and it doesn't get to the point where the film is unwatchable. The film is also a great directorial effort from Danny Boyle who has become one of the best directors of this generation. I still found that James Franco's character is lacking a bit of a back story and that drags it down a bit. Expand
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10
cryhardhumorJun 9, 2015
Of course it's violent and shocking, but it's also personal, beautiful, relatable, and above all inspiring. It is a movie for the weak of heart, but strong of stomach
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10
MattBrady99Mar 13, 2015
Aron Ralston: "I'm in pretty deep doodoo here."

The story is about a mountain climber becomes trapped under a boulder in a remote area near Moab, Utah, he must resort to extreme measures in order to survive. Danny Boyle once again
Aron Ralston: "I'm in pretty deep doodoo here."

The story is about a mountain climber becomes trapped under a boulder in a remote area near Moab, Utah, he must resort to extreme measures in order to survive.

Danny Boyle once again proves that he is a fantastic director in this movie. The way he shots and show the trouble that are main character goes through, it's truly great. The cinematography in this movie took the wind out of me it's that brilliant. This is James Franco best role I've seen him. He made me care about his character and he almost made my cry a little a bit.

My only nick picks with the film are the goofy scenes with the Scooby-Doo scene. I'm sorry but that scene came out of no where and lost the serious of the movie for me, and I no his seeing things because his losing a lot of blood and he's in a tight space, but still you can't help to ask "What the hell was all that about?".

127 hours is a excellent film with mind blowing camera work and one of the best directing I've seen since Spielberg.
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10
Another_NerdFeb 26, 2015
Late review, but I couldn't resist. This film was clearly a challenge, and not an easy one to depict.

But, it upped Slumdog Millionaire. Boyle's direction, Dodmantle's shots, Rahman and Dido, and, of course, James Franco. The film was a
Late review, but I couldn't resist. This film was clearly a challenge, and not an easy one to depict.

But, it upped Slumdog Millionaire. Boyle's direction, Dodmantle's shots, Rahman and Dido, and, of course, James Franco. The film was a complete package, and it is one of the best films I have seen. A must watch.
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10
Mollislayer34Feb 18, 2015
I absolutely love this movie! I think I have watched it for ten times now and I never get bored to it. Danny Boyle didn't let me down in this one either. They have really invested in making the circumstances and the equipment look the same asI absolutely love this movie! I think I have watched it for ten times now and I never get bored to it. Danny Boyle didn't let me down in this one either. They have really invested in making the circumstances and the equipment look the same as in the real event of Aron Ralston (I have watched YouTube-videos) and I love the way James Franco as Aron Ralston uses his engineering skills in the movie. The movie gives me chills every time and the sound effects and the music really describes the feelings of the main character very well. That brings me to the next point. The soundtrack. One of the best EVER I think. When watching this movie, I really forget all my own worries or they start to feel very small. It kind of feels like you are there, all alone with Aron Ralston, cheering him to keep going. Overall, I really think everyone should see this movie. Expand
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9
Potarto72Dec 22, 2014
127 Hours is brilliant on every level. It completely immerses the viewer more effectively than I've ever seen a movie do, and offers an uplifting story that's disturbing in the best way.
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8
DenisManuSep 5, 2014
127 Hours is a dramatic yet uplifting movie about the will to live in an almost impossible to survive scenario.James Franco redeems himself for the original Spider-Man movies, by truly showing his capability to act.Danny Boyle gives you127 Hours is a dramatic yet uplifting movie about the will to live in an almost impossible to survive scenario.James Franco redeems himself for the original Spider-Man movies, by truly showing his capability to act.Danny Boyle gives you another based on a true movie that's absolutely brilliant and exciting. Expand
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7
Meth-dudeApr 19, 2014
James Franco did an awesome job as Aron Ralston.The director Danny Boyle also did an awesome job.For a movie of 94 minutes with only one character stuck in the desert we don't get bored. Awesome movie.
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9
MichMartMar 5, 2014
This movie shows us how far a person would go to keep alive (it's a story of hope) and the cinematography fits to the situation. 127 Hours is a bit long for the story, but the the rest is phenomenal.
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7
KayakMar 3, 2014
Boyle and Franco give you a real in-depth experience into this ordeal. You feel the anguish and you feel the triumph. For what it is, it's pretty great but a few niggling qualms stop this from being exceptional.
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7
hardkor33Aug 5, 2013
127 Hours 7/10........................................................................................................................................
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7
dMoviezzzJul 14, 2013
Although i didn't like the sadism for cutting his hand, I like the plot and the story. And it's truly inspire me to appreciate life that been given by God for me. This film shows great hard work to escape the danger and it pays by the result.Although i didn't like the sadism for cutting his hand, I like the plot and the story. And it's truly inspire me to appreciate life that been given by God for me. This film shows great hard work to escape the danger and it pays by the result. Great movie! Expand
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8
AndreiCJun 13, 2013
A good piece of work, shows us what are the real limits of a human in tough circumstances at every level of his mental changes through the chaotic situation. James Franco delivers a good, realistic performance.
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7
ExKingMay 30, 2013
"watching this movie is kinda like someone approaches you from behind and begin to chock you little by little and then he releases his hands and suddenly you take a giant breath that's give you goose bumps all over your body" original."watching this movie is kinda like someone approaches you from behind and begin to chock you little by little and then he releases his hands and suddenly you take a giant breath that's give you goose bumps all over your body" original.
this movie is just impressive and Danny Boyle blow my mind with these amazing shots and amazing visual effects some scenes were difficult to watch but Danny Boyle tried to show the picture as it is and he succeeded.
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8
jlol13Apr 23, 2013
I thought James Franco's performance was pretty incredible. I can't imagine getting into the mindset of a man literally stuck between a rock and a hard place. As for Boyle's direction, I thought he did a good job keeping most of the scenesI thought James Franco's performance was pretty incredible. I can't imagine getting into the mindset of a man literally stuck between a rock and a hard place. As for Boyle's direction, I thought he did a good job keeping most of the scenes dynamic. That being said, some of it was a little slow, but come on, its seems like it would be tough to come up with 2 hours of nail biting content when your main character can't even move. Expand
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10
HaithamBayazeedMar 1, 2013
One of my favorite movies of all time, amazing and thrilling adventure of life and death, with friendship and possibilities, this is the story of a brave man in attempt to discover the world of mysteries.
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9
jab1995Feb 13, 2013
A special movie! Magnificent making of and really touching movie. Aaron survived in this dramatic situation with his dreams memories and imagination. I think that James Franco deserved here an oscar because he suited completely in this role.
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8
worleyjamersDec 8, 2012
An absolutely fantastic film! A powerful, touching, and inspirational film that is truly one of a kind. Fantastically shot and brilliantly directed by Danny Boyle, this film captures what I thought could never be an intriguing story. I was soAn absolutely fantastic film! A powerful, touching, and inspirational film that is truly one of a kind. Fantastically shot and brilliantly directed by Danny Boyle, this film captures what I thought could never be an intriguing story. I was so wrong! This film delivers in so many ways that I never imagined. It is undoubtedly worthy of all the praise it received. This film would have had zero effectiveness had it not been for the Oscar nominated performance by James Franco. He brilliantly portrays the trapped Aron Ralston as he cycles through countless emotions. His talent and his maturity as an actor shines here; this performance solidifies him as one the best young actors today. The film also has great cinemtography and a brilliant musical score by A.R. Rahman.

As for the arm scene. You've probably heard of it. It's gory and disturbing both visually and sound wise. However, it's a brilliant part of the story that is essential to it's message, the scene is not bad when you think of it in light of what else is happening.

127 Hours...a brilliant, brilliant film. One of the best of 2010, and truly one of a kind. I absolutely recommend it!
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10
Compi24Nov 28, 2012
An almost faultlessly directed, wonderfully well-acted inspirational drama, featuring a lovely soundtrack.
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10
lilkillpappyNov 20, 2012
One of the best films I have ever seen. If you didnt like it its because you didnt get it, and because you are completely retarded. Knowing the premise of the film gives you absolutely no idea as to what this film is actually about.
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