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Mixed or average reviews - based on 35 Critics What's this?

User Score
5.8

Mixed or average reviews- based on 33 Ratings

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  • Starring:
  • Summary: A stylish reinvention of the 1960's classic, Alfie is a humorous, sexy and often touching tale of a philosophical womanizer (Law) who is forced to question his seemingly carefree existence. (Paramount)
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 35
  2. Negative: 8 out of 35
  1. Reviewed by: Sid Smith
    88
    What a bright, entertaining, cleverly updated and utterly satisfying comedy the new Alfie turns out to be.
  2. Where Caine was like an arsonist in his relationships, Law's Alfie is more like a kid playing with matches -- innocent and genuinely surprised when things start blowing up around him. Law makes Alfie's befuddlement a surprisingly poignant thing to witness.
  3. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    70
    A breezy, sexy romp with a conscience that reflects in obvious but interesting ways on societal changes over the intervening 38 years.
  4. This new version, which retains nearly every character and echoes nearly every scenario, is somehow its complete opposite--a slight, breezy incarnation that tries like hell to dishearten, which only makes it disingenuous.
  5. The trouble with Alfie - apart from the film's existence, and the wrongheaded idea of remaking a minor classic - is that not a soul is likable.
  6. Perhaps the more appropriate question to put to this remake would be "What the hell’s the point?"
  7. 25
    Shyer's version is a thing of infinite emptiness and nauseating vanity. It's not funny, alluring, affecting, or erotic, just conceited.

See all 35 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 15
  2. Negative: 6 out of 15
  1. Filmgirl
    Dec 2, 2005
    10
    I didn't expect it but this was a great movie. Fun and poignant at the same time. Bravo!
  2. Apr 6, 2012
    7
    Enjoyable! There are very good moments, and I loved the performances, the general feeling of it, and the music; however, there is something missing that I can't identify; I have watched it a few times already, and I always have a good time doing that. I think for what it is, is a nice movie. Fun, somehow sexy, light, and refreshing. Not overly deep, but it explores life as many people-more people than what we think- live it. We may just not see it. Expand
  3. Sep 18, 2013
    7
    Esta pelicula me gusto, me parecio buena.Me parecio bueno que el protagonista le hablara al publico en las escenas, mas que una pelicula la considero como un video de 103 minutos sobre conquistar mujeres.Yo nunca vi la cinta original de 1966, sino la hubiera criticado de forma diferente. Expand
  4. PaulD.
    Jan 6, 2006
    5
    Good soundtrack and performances don't make up for shallowness of script and direction in this pointless remake.
  5. TonyB.
    Nov 3, 2005
    4
    This strangely unsexy film is an unnecessary remake of something that was highly overrated to begin with. The acting is good enough, but Jude Law looks too young for his last scene with Susan Sarandon to make any sense. For the most part, it is a series of vaguely related scenes which the running monologue, a gimmick that soon wears out its welcome, fails to mesh into a smooth-flowing whole. What is the point here? Are we supposed to feel sorry for our anti-hero at the end? I don't, simply because he will soon become involved on some level and in some way with the next available female who comes his way...and that's what it's really all about. Expand
  6. MarkB.
    Nov 9, 2004
    2
    What's it all about, indeed. There are three, and only three, truthful moments in this aggressively superficial, emotionally fraudulent and (need we say it?) totally unnecessary remake of the groundbreaking 1966 Michael Caine classic: a short but stunning late-picture confrontation between the womanizing title character (Jude Law) and a former best bud (Omar Epps); our hero's genuinely startled observation on first glimpse of Susan Sarandon that "now THERE'S a real woman!!" (and most certainly Sarandon is)...and, most of all, the rhetorical question asked by one of Alfie's pickups: "What do people see in this Eurotrash anyway?" Couldn't have put it better myself. Co-writer/director Charles Shyer doesn't know either, and he's too essentially gutless to make ol' Alf the callous heel with a veneer of surface charm that Caine so memorably immortalized him as, so Shyer reinvents him as a toothless, focus group-friendly inversion: a charming metrosexual with eyes (and other body parts) that rove around a wee bit too much for his or anyone else's own good. Thus, the guys in the audience can envy him about 90% of the way while the women feel sorry for the sweet, unhousebroken puppy dog and fantasize that if they were only there to be the Annette Bening to his Warren Beatty, why, things would be so much different. (Dream on, ladies.) It's bad enough that the talking-to-the-audience bit, which worked in the original because of its theatrical roots, absolutely doesn't fly today, but Shyer (a three-decade warhorse whose previous efforts have included a couple of Father of the Bride remakes with ex-significant other Nancy Meyers) smothers his material with endless freeze-frames, split screens, slow motion and other gimmickry both to evoke the spirit of 1966 and to make himself seem hip and cutting edge. The result is patronizing and embarrassing: sort of like your Uncle Morty delivering a long monologue about the "bling-bling" he bought Aunt Esther for their 50th. Then again, any attempt to modernize director Lewis Gilbert's and writer Bill Naughton's original oncept was doomed from the get-go: Caine's Alfie was bracing and powerful because the protagonist was so inextricably a part of his time: the height of the British Invasion, with the hippie era just around the corner, was the perfect stomping ground for this hedonist. It goes without saying that Jude Law is no Michael Caine, but one factor that both of them share is a very heavy workload and an apparent inability to turn down any project that comes their way. Again, though, the similarity ends here: Law has Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, I Heart Huckabees and this currently occupying multiplexes; Caine may have made a good many unwise career choices (Jaws: The Revenge, anyone?) but I don't think he EVER made three flicks in a row that almost completely sucked. Expand

See all 15 User Reviews

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