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61

Generally favorable reviews - based on 6 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: In 2008, as George W. Bush tried to gift the energy and mining industries thousands of acres of pristine Utah wilderness via a widely disputed federal auction, college student Tim DeChristopher decided to monkey-wrench the process. Bidding $1.7 million, he won 22,000 acres with no intention to pay or drill. For this astonishing (and successful) act of civil disobedience he was sent to federal prison. Bidder 70 tells the story of this peaceful warrior whose patriotism and willingness to sacrifice have ignited the climate justice movement. [First Run Features] Collapse
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 6
  2. Negative: 1 out of 6
  1. Reviewed by: Diana Clarke
    May 14, 2013
    80
    Tim DeChristopher, proves a fascinating subject for Beth and George Gage's new documentary.
  2. Reviewed by: Gary Goldstein
    Jun 26, 2013
    80
    [A] vital and involving documentary.
  3. Reviewed by: Kalvin Henely
    May 12, 2013
    75
    Without being didactic, the documentary demonstrates how an ordinary concerned citizen can take a stand when politicians neglect to make decisions for the good of the people and instead serve the interests of big business.
  4. Reviewed by: Jeannette Catsoulis
    May 16, 2013
    70
    Wisely deciding to refrain from rapping our knuckles with greenhouse gas statistics and Al Gore-style pie charts, the filmmakers fashion a portrait of a conscience spurred to action by an unexpected opportunity.
  5. Reviewed by: Mark Jenkins
    May 16, 2013
    55
    DeChristopher's primary concern is climate change, which is no small issue. But Bidder 70 would be more compelling if it had used the U.S. government's assault on the ad hoc activist to also discuss threats to the American political environment.
  6. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    May 16, 2013
    25
    At least there is a happy ending — DeChristopher, for wasting the government’s resources, properly served 21 months in federal prison. Now, he has moved on to Harvard Divinity School, where his sanctimony will serve him well.

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