Caterpillar Image
Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 7 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: During the Second Sino-Japanese War, a village woman is given the grueling task of looking after (and fulfilling the sexual needs of) her quadruple-amputee husband, a decorated solider tortured by memories of his war crimes. Based on a short story by Edogawa Rampo, Koji Wakamatsu’s film is a fascinating, deeply affecting indictment of right-wing militarist-nationalism — a partner-piece to the left-wing extremism of United Red Army. (Lorber Films) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    May 6, 2011
    100
    If it plays in any theaters beyond New York and Los Angeles, that'll probably come as a surprise to its distributor (the estimable Lorber Films). None of that diminishes the power and intensity of this claustrophobic mini-masterpiece of the Japanese antiwar tradition, which blends a B-movie aesthetic, brilliant use of montage and documentary elements and a scathing critique of nationalism and militarism.
  2. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    May 5, 2011
    83
    Before its spell unravels with overdone theatricality and on-the-nose flashbacks, Caterpillar succeeds as a kind of representational horror movie.
  3. Reviewed by: V.A. Musetto
    May 6, 2011
    75
    The Japanese anti-war drama Caterpillar is difficult to watch. But it's directed, acted and photographed well, and it's worth seeing even if it makes you uncomfortable.
  4. Reviewed by: Eric Hynes
    May 3, 2011
    70
    It's cinema that risks blunt silliness to achieve emotional and experiential seriousness.
  5. Reviewed by: Mike Hale
    May 6, 2011
    70
    Shinobu Terajima, a major figure in Japan who won the best actress award at the 2010 Berlin film festival for Caterpillar, is effective as the wife, though Mr. Wakamatsu is more interested in scoring political and historical points than in shaping her character.
  6. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    May 3, 2011
    60
    Based on a banned short story from the 1920s, Caterpillar might be read as a reaction to hawkish nationalism, but it's more a cry for the unknown soldier in the kitchen and bedroom.
  7. Reviewed by: Vadim Rizov
    May 11, 2011
    50
    Essentially a sexually charged two-hander with blunt allegorical implications, Kôji Wakamatsu's one-note follow-up to United Red Army is a disappointing affair, visually indifferent and thematically simplistic.
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