Cut to Black

Cut to Black Image
Metascore
  1. First Review
  2. Second Review
  3. Third Review
  4. Fourth Review

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  • Summary: A disgraced cop is hired by a wealthy former friend to rid his estranged daughter of a stalker.

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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 3
  2. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. Reviewed by: Ronnie Scheib
    Oct 21, 2013
    70
    Although the film wears its dated genre affectations on its sleeve, the script avoids pretension, its hero’s believably alienated exhaustion overriding mere nostalgia.
  2. Reviewed by: Jeannette Catsoulis
    Oct 17, 2013
    50
    A mildly engaging lowlife odyssey that struggles not to choke on its own style.
  3. Reviewed by: Zachary Wigon
    Oct 17, 2013
    50
    While Eberle's execution falls short, the scale of his ambition can't help but stir admiration.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Oct 19, 2013
    8
    A great independent film that uses a mix of classic and modern film conventions to give a new spin on the film noir genre. I saw this movie atA great independent film that uses a mix of classic and modern film conventions to give a new spin on the film noir genre. I saw this movie at Cinema Village in New York, and was surprised at how strong it was, especially after the Times complained of how cheap it was. The music and cinematography, and the lead performance we all first rate. I recommend this film to anyone tired of the same old indies. Expand
  2. Oct 18, 2013
    6
    The best part of the NYT review was: "More high homage than actual movie, “Cut to Black” is nevertheless weirdly diverting, mostly because ofThe best part of the NYT review was: "More high homage than actual movie, “Cut to Black” is nevertheless weirdly diverting, mostly because of the impressive black-and-white cinematography of James Parsons. Delivering a saturated aesthetic that manages to transcend the film’s tonal inertia and restricted budget, Mr. Parsons gives life to cold flesh and bleak dialogue. His talent, and Mr. Eberle’s depressed performance, gradually win you over" because I've met Mr. Parsons and know how hard he works on his stuff. Expand