Metascore
55

Mixed or average reviews - based on 13 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 13
  2. Negative: 1 out of 13
  1. Reviewed by: Alan Scherstuhl
    Nov 19, 2013
    90
    Michael Winterbottom's wise and involving Everyday specializes in unscripted-feeling moments that ache of life.
  2. Reviewed by: Kevin Harley
    Nov 12, 2013
    80
    A slice of raggedy realism with ultra-naturalistic performances.
  3. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Nov 12, 2013
    80
    A valuable, meticulously observed and wonderfully acted social-realist feature about a family under pressure.
  4. Reviewed by: David Lee Dallas
    Nov 18, 2013
    75
    While the film charts its protagonist's gradual progression toward a renewed sense of agency and freedom, it rarely indulges in lengthy or even linear narrative arcs.
  5. Reviewed by: Stephen Holden
    Nov 21, 2013
    70
    Moment by moment, it all adds up. The scenes of the family huddling and hugging, greeting and parting, and reaffirming primal bonds are quietly moving.
  6. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Nov 21, 2013
    60
    Filmed — patiently, beautifully — over that same length of time, the film’s day-to-day aches are quiet and lovingly rendered.
  7. Reviewed by: David Fear
    Nov 19, 2013
    60
    Even with the actors’ laudable work—especially Simm, who finally shakes off the notion that he’s a poor man’s Simon Pegg—there’s not enough going on past the temporal trick to make the humanistic elements pop. Gimmick aside, the title is regrettably apropos.
  8. Reviewed by: Dave Calhoun
    Nov 12, 2013
    60
    The unusually extended shooting period and Winterbottom’s decision to cast siblings as the kids make for a strangely intimate and powerful depiction of time passing and the peaks and troughs of childhood.
  9. Reviewed by: Mike D'Angelo
    Nov 20, 2013
    42
    Movies don’t necessarily have to tell stories, but if narrative is eschewed in favor of an unvarnished portrait of ordinary life, it’s best to cheat a little and make ordinary life feel extraordinary. Michael Winterbottom’s Everyday refuses to stoop to such measures; for better and for worse — mostly for worse — it sticks to the mundane promise of its title.
  10. Reviewed by: Sam Adams
    Nov 21, 2013
    40
    Perhaps fittingly, part of the problem with Everyday is that it’s too short, both in micro and macro terms. Ninety-odd minutes isn’t long enough to make the full weight of the elapsed time register.
  11. Reviewed by: Peter Debruge
    Nov 12, 2013
    40
    As the years go by and the kids grow — perhaps the only real benefit of Winterbottom’s approach — time begins to run together, making it all too easy for the mind to wander.
  12. Reviewed by: Robbie Collin
    Nov 12, 2013
    40
    For all its innovativeness, Everyday has the rhythms and intrigue of a not-very-interesting family’s Christmas letters.
  13. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    Nov 12, 2013
    30
    An admirable idea in theory proves to be a real slog to sit through in Everyday.

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