Godzilla

Metascore
62

Generally favorable reviews - based on 48 Critics What's this?

User Score
6.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 1391 Ratings

Your Score
0 out of 10
Rate this:
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
Watch On
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 48
  2. Negative: 1 out of 48
  1. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    May 16, 2014
    90
    This is a movie of tremendous visual daring, magnificent special-effects work and surprising moral gravity.
  2. Reviewed by: Drew McWeeny
    May 11, 2014
    83
    This could easily be ground zero for a whole new series of films, but if it remains a stand-alone single movie, Edwards told an entire story, and for the first time in as long as I can remember, it feels like Godzilla actually matters.
  3. Reviewed by: Rene Rodriguez
    May 15, 2014
    75
    Here, finally, is a giant monster movie made in the anything-goes CGI era still capable of making your jaw drop.
  4. Reviewed by: Michael O'Sullivan
    May 15, 2014
    63
    Fortunately, the monsters are actually kind of a kick. And isn’t that why you go to see a movie like this anyway?
  5. Reviewed by: Tom Huddleston
    May 11, 2014
    60
    It’s always fun to watch scaly, skyscraper-size behemoths lay waste to civilization, but a bit more human drama wouldn’t have gone amiss.
  6. Reviewed by: Anthony Lane
    May 19, 2014
    50
    Skip Godzilla the movie. Watch the trailer.
  7. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    May 11, 2014
    30
    Edwards’ Godzilla dawdles toward its Doomsday climax; the movie could win a prize for Least Stuff Happening in the First Two-Thirds of an Action Film... It’s a concept lacking a magnetic story, a package without a product.

See all 48 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 80 out of 447
  1. May 16, 2014
    10
    To all the people who complain there wasn't enough Godzilla in this movie: Have you ever seen the original Gojira (1954)? Or ever heard of aTo all the people who complain there wasn't enough Godzilla in this movie: Have you ever seen the original Gojira (1954)? Or ever heard of a thing called 'tension-building'? Surely not.

    This film was everything I hoped it would be and thensome! The characters were all great, there isn't a single bad performance - everyone treats this with respect and add an appropriately serious tone to the film. Ford Brody is my favourite as his strict code of honour and morals was put to the test by malevolent creatures, which created some brilliant dilemmas and great duo scenes with his father (played brilliantly by Bryan Cranston). Themes were perfectly adapted from the original Gojira, which makes this 10x more dark and gritty, but it doesn't come off as stale or half-assed.

    Godzilla himself is a majestic beast, and one I don't think audiences will forget about in the near future, as well as the MUTOs who are perfect adversaries for Godzilla. This isn't Pacific Rim, you actually care about these Monsters fighting and look forward to the outcome.

    In conclusion, Gareth Edwards' Godzilla is a magnificent monster movie full of heart and soul with wonderful direction and spectacular visual effects.

    Even better than the original, IMO! (10/10)
    Expand
  2. May 25, 2014
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. As an origin story, this was a great movie. I walked away from the theater with a huge smile on my face and an "I can't wait to see that again" feeling. It might be the first movie in over a decade that I will go back to see at the theater more than once. I loved it, and the fight between the MUTO and Godzilla was such an awesome payoff, the teasing throughout was frustrating but in a good way. It was nice to see a movie play with this kind of tease, not just blow your load halfway through you know? Like how many times would we want to see Godzilla fight the same guys in the same setting?

    You can't please them all, and most people who come on sites like IGN tend to be boring old bastards who just like to find things to **** about. People tend to forget that movies started as a form of entertainment, and to me, THAT is the only stick which I use to measure a movies greatness, and this movie was ABSOLUTELY entertaining.

    The people complaining about there being not enough Godzilla, as this is an origin movie, you can't expect him to just stomp his way through the first scene.

    I really like that they downplayed the human significance in this movie, and made it mostly about the Kaiju. The humans were no doubt the main driving force behind the plot, but at the same time they seemed like a background element in the movie. This fascinating mix was a nice change of pace. At the end of the day, it must be difficult to balance the human/Kaiju elements of the story, in a movie like this, but we have to ask ourselves, do we really WANT the human element to be more present than what it was? In a movie about giant monsters fighting each other?

    When the Military devised it's brainless plan of nuking all 3 Kaiju I nearly died of disappointment, to see a movie I was loving so much play with such a stupid idea...... then I got to watch the MUTO's take that idea, and rip it to piece's, in the exact way it deserved to be.

    My only disappointment, was that Bryan Cranston died way too quickly, I would have liked to see Cranston and Aaron Taylor swap places in the story. I agree with the writers that having both characters exist in the movies plot would have been very silly and too cliché.

    The best moment, was hands down, Godzilla breathing his radioactive breath down the MUTO's throat, so....freaking....boss.
    Expand
  3. May 17, 2014
    8
    So I went to see the movie again because the first I felt like I didnt catch up some things and some other things bothered me.My fault (and ISo I went to see the movie again because the first I felt like I didnt catch up some things and some other things bothered me.My fault (and I think a lot us did the same mistake) the first time I watched the film was that I went to see Godzilla and with this thinking I didnt connect to the characters.This time I went to see it again but I wanted to see a film not ONLY about Godzilla but also about humans and I was able to actually connect enough with them to route for them and the things I didnt get the first or didnt like this time I liked a lot.Thats a tip.Go see Godzilla a second time but dont think about Godzilla as the main character.Think about the humans as well and I hope you will enjoy the movie much more than the first time. Expand
  4. Aug 9, 2014
    7
    Not as good as the expectations, but it’s still an massive and entertaining movie that’s worth paying for.

    This Godzilla reboot is both
    Not as good as the expectations, but it’s still an massive and entertaining movie that’s worth paying for.

    This Godzilla reboot is both massive and highly unique, and the directing is just something spectacular. Gareth Edwards is one director I’m not familiar with, but with this movie he truly kept me interested. The things that truly stands out with this movie is the epic soundtrack, the CGI and massive and unique scenes that I never have seen before. There are much awesome things with this movie, but it got some critical downsides. The aspects of the movie that I find most disturbing is that there could have been more scenes with Godzilla, it felt like the focus of the film is on other things. Another critical thing is that it could have had more action sequences, and that some choices that some characters did isn’t well thought through. Aaron Taylor-Johnson isn’t the best actor for the main role, I think they should focused more on Bryan Cranston, who is an flawless actor. The final critical thing with Godzilla is that one of the main characters died, and I think that ruined the movie, but also that the ending could have been more entertaining.

    My conclusion of Godzilla is that it’s an cool and massive movie that's well directed, but it got some critical things that lowers my rating.

    Godzilla get a 7/10
    Expand
  5. Aug 25, 2015
    6
    Godzilla, in this technological generation is more sprawling, is more breath-taking, and does not live up to expectation. The story itself isGodzilla, in this technological generation is more sprawling, is more breath-taking, and does not live up to expectation. The story itself is simple, with no explanation for Godzilla's appearance, and the forgettable main character called "What's his name again?". It lacks action sequences, heart-pumping moment and the epicness of battle between giant monsters. The only good thing was its visual, and Bryan Cranston's performance. Expand
  6. May 8, 2015
    5
    There is a moment in Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla in which two creatures — M.U.T.O.s in the film’s parlance — start nuzzling. Given the director’sThere is a moment in Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla in which two creatures — M.U.T.O.s in the film’s parlance — start nuzzling. Given the director’s startling lo-fi debut Monsters gave us full-on creature rutting, you might fear that this is a daring director being shackled by a rating-conscious studio. Happily, the Brit director’s take on the Toho studio icon gives full reign to his ability to create compelling imagery and a knockout monster mash. It’s a shame, then, that the movie gets caught between honouring the character’s B-movie conceit AND delivering a let’s-take-everything-super-seriously approach de rigueur in post-Dark Knight blockbusterdom. If any film needed a sense of levity, it is one about a 355-foot lizard hitting stuff.

    The movie gets off to a cracking start, a title sequence depicting nuclear tests, Darwinian theory, sea monster illustrations and redacted information all to Alexandre Desplat’s flash-and-thunder score. Yet, unlike 99.9 per cent of recent blockbusters, the film then admirably slows down to set up story strands of (chillingly mounted) family tragedy, anomalous seismic activity, frustrated interrogations, perplexed scientists and all-round conspiracy.

    Edwards and credited writer Max Borenstein try their darnedest to legitimise the potentially hokey conceit, smartly respecting the creature’s atomic age roots by imagining the ’50s nuclear tests as attempts to kill off the subterranean creatures and peppering the movie with post-War On Terrorism reference points: jets plummeting out of the sky, carnage playing out on 24-hour rolling news, helicopter shots of refugees escaping to safety, the displaced seeking out loved ones in huge stadia. There is definitely no place for Godzooky in this world.

    Yet underneath the patina of realism, Godzilla doesn’t have the story smarts to pull you through. Much of the drama set up in the first 30 minutes bears little consequence later on. The scene work suffers from logic lapses (where does Watanabe get his preternatural understanding of Godzilla’s motives?) or feels just plain fudged — a plan involving a nuclear bomb is unclear and unthrilling.

    Edwards creates evocative moments, both small — a slug crawls over a toy tank — and huge — a submarine dangles from a tree — but he has less of a sense of keying it into a narrative imperative. The HALO jumping that everyone loved in the trailer remains fantastic but makes little sense when it appears the army can simply drive into the danger zone. If the movie had a different, more playful tone — Independence Day, for example — all this would be less problematic. But in the credible real world the film seems to want to set up, it just rings dumb.

    While the characters may get time to breathe, they don’t emerge as a complex, memorable bunch. For all the great casting, the first-base writing never allows these people to emerge as anything but stock characters. Bryan Cranston is at his most Cranstonish as a man trying to prove a theory deemed crackpot, Aaron Taylor-Johnson is a colourless, stoic soldier, a criminally under-utilised Elizabeth Olsen is a wife-mother-nurse permanently stuck on the end of a phone, Ken Watanabe is a noble Japanese scientist who spurts homilies about messing with nature, Sally Hawkins his exposition-clarifying assistant, and David Strathairn labours as a one-note military man. Given, as with most creature features, the humans are bystanders doing practically zilch to affect the outcome, it demanded a more rounded, engaging dramatis personae.

    This lack of personality extends to the main monster. In certain respects the Lizard King struggles to register as the star of his own film. Not only does Edwards afford the evil M.U.T.O.s (Massive Unidentified Terrestrial Objects) a better introduction — Godzilla’s entrance feels a bit thrown away — the malevolent, moth-like creatures also seem to get longer screen time and more characterful business.

    Edwards’ film boasts great filmmaking, noble intentions and cracking monster action. Yet it never reconciles its B-movie origins — preposterous premise, clichéd characters — with its solemn, Nolanised tone. This Godzilla stomps but very rarely romps.
    Expand
  7. Jun 21, 2015
    0
    What an absolute disaster, not only as a Godzilla movie, but as monster movie in general. Godzilla is literally on film only about 15What an absolute disaster, not only as a Godzilla movie, but as monster movie in general. Godzilla is literally on film only about 15 minutes. The "spectacular" final fight takes place at night in a black cloud of dust. You can barely make out any of the action taking place in the dark.

    This is really a film about a navy man and his relationships with his father and family. Godzilla is a background for this family drama. This movie reminds me of the terrible first Hulk film. Horrible. horrible, horrible!
    Expand

See all 447 User Reviews

Trailers

Related Articles

  1. Your Metascore Predictions for 30 Summer Movies

    Your Metascore Predictions for 30 Summer Movies Image
    Published: April 29, 2014
    We asked you to predict the Metascores for summer's biggest films. Here are the results from over 2,200 votes.