Metascore
20

Generally unfavorable reviews - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 21
  2. Negative: 15 out of 21
  1. Reviewed by: Andy Webster
    Apr 28, 2011
    30
    While it seems there's no getting away from this marketing aesthetic, the resemblance at times to a video game is far, far too acute.
  2. Reviewed by: Robert Abele
    Apr 28, 2011
    30
    Hansel and Gretel are this movie's breakout stars, but it's not enough to make Hoodwinked Too feel like anything but a storybook hurled straight at your head.
  3. Reviewed by: Peter Hartlaub
    Apr 29, 2011
    25
    The need for a sequel was zero - proved by the fact that the characters end the movie pretty much exactly where they started it.
  4. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Apr 29, 2011
    25
    Red Riding Hood needs a better agent.
  5. Reviewed by: Liam Lacey
    Apr 29, 2011
    25
    It's outstandingly obnoxious.
  6. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Apr 28, 2011
    25
    Memorable for being one of the most obnoxious animated movies of recent years.
  7. Reviewed by: Tom Russo
    Apr 28, 2011
    25
    By the time the giant, snarling spider shows up - the most boggling of the movie's various "holy schnitzel" touches - parents of the littlest "Hoodwinked" fans may be feeling hoodwinked themselves.
  8. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Apr 28, 2011
    25
    As if by deliberate and vaguely sadistic design, Hoodwinked Too! Hood Vs. Evil leeches the fun clean out of the first "Hoodwinked" (2005).
  9. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    Apr 26, 2011
    20
    Less a movie than a ill-advised lab experiment in which classic children's stories are injected with Bond-movie stylings, inane wisecracks and martial-arts mayhem, this manic misfire takes storybook revisionism to ever more irritating ends.
  10. Reviewed by: Nick Schager
    Apr 26, 2011
    20
    Further marred by second-rate 3-D and the sort of cornball one-liners that even a fairy godmother couldn't love, it's a tolerance-testing tale that puts the grim in Grimm.
  11. Reviewed by: Steve Persall
    Apr 27, 2011
    16
    For the love of movies, stay away.
  12. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    Apr 29, 2011
    12
    Parents should take their children to Hoodwinked Too! Hood Vs. Evil, if only because kids are never too young to learn the important and liberating skill of walking out of a movie and demanding a refund.
  13. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    Apr 26, 2011
    10
    One of the most obnoxious and least necessary animated films of the century thus far.
  14. Reviewed by: Marjorie Baumgarten
    May 5, 2011
    0
    The only entities hoodwinked by this animated sequel are paying customers.
  15. Reviewed by: Michelle Orange
    Apr 26, 2011
    0
    One of the more depressing, desensitizing experiences I've had in a theater, Hoodwinked Too! Hood Vs. Evil feels as computer-generated as its creepy, talking-ceramic-toy style of animation.
User Score
4.6

Mixed or average reviews- based on 46 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 20
  2. Negative: 8 out of 20
  1. Apr 30, 2011
    2
    The kindest thing I can say about this lifeless HOODWINKED sequel is that you should take your kids to see RIO. If you've already taken yourThe kindest thing I can say about this lifeless HOODWINKED sequel is that you should take your kids to see RIO. If you've already taken your kids to see RIO...then take your kids to see RIO again. My 6 and 4 year old boys enjoyed HOODWINKED TOO (although they both gave it an 'A' as supposed to their standard 'A+' for all things animated...this inspires hope as they're learning the balanced art of downgrading). from a parents point of view, however, this below sub-par, Red Riding Hood, fairy tale mish-mash provides nothing more than 90 minutes of childcare while mom and/or dad catch an in-theater nap. The animation is sloppy, the story uncreative and the lazy pop culture references thick. Take your kids see the bird movie 'cause Mother Goose just laid an egg. Full Review »
  2. Dec 23, 2011
    4
    With me actually enjoying the movie I have to be honest it is a disaster it isn't much of a piece of a story more like one being smashed toWith me actually enjoying the movie I have to be honest it is a disaster it isn't much of a piece of a story more like one being smashed to bits but I liked it and it is entertaining. I give this movie 45%. Full Review »
  3. May 21, 2011
    3
    This review contains spoilers, click full review link to view. The big bad wolf is a reporter. It's the perfect disguise for a sexual deviant. Nobody would ever suspect an investigative journalist of molesting little children. A newsman doesn't commit crimes; he reports on them. In "Hoodwinked", Nicky Flippers, the British-accented frog who runs a secret agency called H.E.A., gathers all those under suspicion of being the "Goodie Bandit" into the parlor, which includes Red, her granny, the actor, and the furry scribe. "The wolf did it. Talk about profiling," complains the journalist who systematically is accused, then exonerated by the frog during the amphibian's summation gathering, where through the process of elimination, it's determined that the bunny is the guilty party, who makes off with Granny's recipe book whilst Nicky imitates the pragmatism of a Scotland Yard detective. But the frog, so smug and self-assured in his powers of deduction, drops the ball on the bigger, more heinous crime, in which he overlooks not one, but two sexual predators, who want nothing more but to ravish the little delivery girl. Surprisingly, even though "Hoodwinked" is an animated film intended for small children, the adult theme of a young girl's sexual awakening, prevalent in the subtext of the classic Brothers Grimm faerie tale, where the wolf, who is made anthropomorphic by his attempt to seduce Little Red Riding Hood from her grandmother's bed in disguise as the silver-haired matriarch, is even more self-evident about his lecherous urges than the film warrants. After the classic exchange between the girl and wolf about the latter's oversized body parts, anomalous to that of an old lady's anatomy, he adds, "Are we just gonna sit around here and talk about how big I'm getting?" Red, however, is considerably younger than her counterpart in "Red Riding Hood", as substantiated by her reluctance to walk through the woods(which is metaphorically speaking, representative of a girl's emerging womanhood), but instead, uses the ski lift to ride over the forest, therefore robbing the red cloak of its traditional association with menstrual blood. Despite her tender age, Red, like all girls, can't help but be objectified, so inevitably, she ends up in the woods, and is suddenly fair game to the wolf, who doesn't care that Red's hymen is intact, and hasn't seen the sight of her own period blood. Regardless, he comes on to her, making coded inquires about her "goodies basket", and the good smell that it gives off. From Red's point-of-view, the wolf's growl is a menacing one, imbued with sex in its primal roar, precipitating a chase which lands the libidinous pursuer into the lake(akin to a cold shower), where he shouts indignantly, "You can't hold on to those "recipes" forever," recipes, meaning, of course, her virtue. Modeled after "Rashomon", this moderately ambitious cartoon has a narrative splintered off into multiple points-of-view. As the wolf tells it, his bared teeth and threatening hand gestures was induced by a tail injury, but given the filmic context of the celebrated touchstone in Japanese cinema, can the journalist be trusted to give an accurate recounting of events? Probably not. He's about as reliable as the bandit Tajomaru and the other witnesses giving testimony to the prefecture magistrate. Notable for its fallible narration, the Kurosawa film employed flashbacks that obfuscated the truth. For all intents and purposes, The Woodsman is lying too. The aspiring actor, as a sideline, drives a schnitzel truck, selling the phallic-shaped snacks("schnitzel", by the way, is slang for penis) to unsupervised children who excitedly follow the vehicle that seemingly lures them away from their parents. In the actor's version of events, Red rides her bike past the depressed thespian without his notice, too overcome with grief by what he perceived as a disastrous audition, and yet, the coincidence seems too great that the axe-wielding actor should end up at her grandmother's place in what looks very much like a home invasion. (Did the filmmaker adopt the moniker from "The Woodsman", the 2004 movie about a reformed child molester, with Kevin Bacon?) The moviegoer can either believe the official story(the actor claims that he was doing research for his role as a woodsman), or that he did see Red passing by his schnitzel truck and followed her back to grandmother's house. Even worse, in "Hoodwinked Too: Red vs. Evil", the wolf's lust for underaged children is made more explicit, remarking, "Let me tell you something about Goldilocks. That is not her natural hair color." Meanwhile, Red gets her period, which is suggested by how her cloak refashions itself into a long vertical line(meaning that her menstrual blood is trickling down) at the outset, as a preventive measure against falling off the bridge which leads to the training academy. The ogre functions as a stand-in for the wolves of the world that a young girl like Red has to fend off. Full Review »