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Generally favorable reviews - based on 24 Critics What's this?

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7.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 128 Ratings

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  • Summary: The latest hallucinatory vision from the iconoclastic director of "Blue Velvet" and "Twin Peaks," Inland Empire stars Laura Dern in a tour-de-force performance as, perhaps, an actress who lands a dream role that quickly devolves into nightmare. (IFC Center)
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 24
  2. Negative: 0 out of 24
  1. Reviewed by: Ken Fox
    100
    In the end, it's best to make peace with the film's essential and deliberate inscrutability -- something Lynch fans have learned to do since Twin Peaks -- and to simply marvel at Dern's astonishing performance, which few actresses are likely to top anytime soon.
  2. Reviewed by: Don R. Lewis
    100
    While I did enjoy the ride I took with the film, after the lights came up I was just thrilled Lynch was allowed to create such a journey for us to go on. Imagine what the cinema world would be like if more great directors threw caution to the wind and followed their artistic vision. It's a world I'd like to see and I hope Lynch continues to pave the way.
  3. 90
    It is Lynch's most experimental endeavor in the 30 years since "Eraserhead," that it will do nothing to draw new fans to the director's work and that, after two viewings, I cannot wait to see it again.
  4. The film is dazzling and bewildering in equal measure.
  5. 50
    If anything, it's worth watching as yet another example of Lynch's extraordinary collaboration with Dern. It may be overstating things to call her performance heroic, but it's nothing if not brave, as she dares to embody Lynch's most brutal impressions of Hollywood -- not as a dream factory, but as the place where dreams come to die.
  6. Inland Empire is way, way beyond my powers of ratiocination. It's the higher math.
  7. Over time, though, with films such as "Lost Highway" and, to a lesser extent, "Mulholland Drive," Lynch's movies became less personal and more private. Whatever he is working out in his new film, Inland Empire, it's beyond the reach of all but his idolators.

See all 24 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 38 out of 65
  2. Negative: 19 out of 65
  1. JL
    Jan 15, 2007
    10
    It's odd that here and elsewhere this film has inspired a thuggish "I didn't get the film so you shouldn't go see it and if It's odd that here and elsewhere this film has inspired a thuggish "I didn't get the film so you shouldn't go see it and if you have you shouldn't like it and if you do there is something wrong with you" attitude. Besides the fact that this is a very un-American attitude, the fact of the matter is that this film really isn't all *that* much further out there than Mulholland Drive - you had advance notice, people! As for the film itself, it left me with the feeling of a disturbing dream that I didn't quite get the meaning of upon waking... in fact, it captured that feeling absolutely perfectly. I've never seen this done so well before in any film, including Eraserhead. In my book, that's a 10. Expand
  2. AnthonyB.
    May 13, 2007
    10
    A film for film lovers - art at its most innovative.
  3. NeilL
    Mar 24, 2009
    10
    Now that the critical dust has settled (love it or hate it, as always), this film stands out as Lynch's most complex, troubling and Now that the critical dust has settled (love it or hate it, as always), this film stands out as Lynch's most complex, troubling and perverse work. For that feat alone it deserves the highest score possible. It will continue to fascinate and perplex. Expand
  4. Jon
    Dec 21, 2006
    9
    I'm just glad I don't live in Mitch G.'s world. The only requirement of the medium is that it have moving images, and "Inland I'm just glad I don't live in Mitch G.'s world. The only requirement of the medium is that it have moving images, and "Inland Empire" has some of the most indelible moving images I've seen in a while. Expand
  5. Oct 6, 2010
    5
    Inland Empire is not a bad film and has some great imagery but it is almost as if Lynch is taking the piss out of himself with virtually noInland Empire is not a bad film and has some great imagery but it is almost as if Lynch is taking the piss out of himself with virtually no story lines and endless amounts of critical interpretation and chatter. Where are the moments of realism like Mulholland Drive? No story, great imagery, average acting. It can only be a 5. Expand
  6. DamonC.
    Dec 17, 2006
    3
    I'm the biggest fan of David Lynch. I have seen Mulholland Drive 5 times, Lost Highway and Blue Velvet twice each, and relished Twin I'm the biggest fan of David Lynch. I have seen Mulholland Drive 5 times, Lost Highway and Blue Velvet twice each, and relished Twin Peaks, The Elephant Man and Wild at Heart. But as much as I wanted to, I didn't go for IE. I think the story is actually very simple: Laura Dern's character, despite not heeding a warning against acting in a particular movie, go ahead and does it anyway and falls in love with her co-star. This opens the pathway into two alternate universes: (i) a white trash equivalent of Laura Dern's character, and (ii) a Polish mirror image. Much happens, but the essential thing is that through the magic (i.e. catharsis) of cinema, a person is able to transcend humdrum problems, even murders, and Laura Dern's character learn enough from the movie to be able to connect to her white trash and Polish selves, and is eventually able to penetrate into a new world, where even bad acting (notably by bunnies, and by implication, herself) receives thunderous applause. Okay, but so what? I sat through three hours of tedium without experiencing much suspense, mystery or in fact, any emotional connection with Laura Dern's incarnations. The best thing about IE was the bunnies, and that was really stolen from a short film done a couple of years ago. I think Lynch is stuck on traveling the lost highway of Mulholland Drive, and needs to get off quick before it all turns into another sordid episode of True Hollywood Stories. Expand
  7. MitchG.
    Dec 12, 2006
    0
    I am completely tired of people championing David Lynch for his surreal style while requiring not ONE iota of actual sense from his I am completely tired of people championing David Lynch for his surreal style while requiring not ONE iota of actual sense from his movies!!!! I'm sorry, I'm still paying $10 for a film, and it is NOT FAIR to abandon narrative entirely and just expect the audience to go along, scene after inexplicable scene. We're watching a movie, not a painting. The medium REQUIRES sense!!! I'm TIRED OF THIS. I appreciate Lynch's technical skills, but at this point he has become the lunatic running the asylum. Because of his cache, people call his nonsense "genius" -- it's laughable actually. It's like "Wow, I don't get that at all... wasn't it just genius?" I could go on and on honestly... I hated this film and had to walk out after two hours. It had long since abandoned any string of possible comprehension by the audience. And then in the middle of this morass, some female characters break into a dance of "The Locomotion". PLEASE. Some people may find that funny -- I find it insulting. If I've convinced just one person not to see this film, I'll be happy. Expand

See all 65 User Reviews

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