User Score
5.4

Mixed or average reviews- based on 29 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 29
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 29
  3. Negative: 13 out of 29
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  1. ChadS
    Apr 14, 2010
    3
    To me, there's more spirituality coursing through the celluloid of Robert Bresson's "Au hasard Balthazar" than this Christian recruitment tool for people who love God, not movies. To me, there's more signs of God in the titular donkey than the church where Brady(Jeffrey Johnson), an alcoholic mailman, finds redemption after a DUI arrest with his son present in the stopped To me, there's more spirituality coursing through the celluloid of Robert Bresson's "Au hasard Balthazar" than this Christian recruitment tool for people who love God, not movies. To me, there's more signs of God in the titular donkey than the church where Brady(Jeffrey Johnson), an alcoholic mailman, finds redemption after a DUI arrest with his son present in the stopped vehicle. But to its credit, "Letters to God" does include a scene in which infidels can relate to, because finally, somebody makes sense. Maddie(Robin Lively), the mother of a young boy stricken with brain cancer, tells her own mom, "Stop quoting the Bible to me. It's not curing my son." She disagrees with God's will, so for a little while, in a loaded film which preaches to the converted, "Letters to God" becomes accesible to those who believe that having faith is "religilous". In her darkest hour, when Maddie can no longer pretend that supplication has the power to repel the cancer cells from ravaging her son Tyler(Tanner Maguire), Olivia(Maree Cheatham), instead of talking like a grown-up, offers her daughter platitudes, a stock choice of words that confronts the matter at hand with magic. (Like Sarah Silverman says, "Jesus is magic!") This mother's flare-up creates a slight rupture in the Christian-based rhetoric of the filmic text, which, incidentally, is the film's only sane moment because "Letters to God" sees tragedy with rose-tinted glasses. Because Tyler drinks the ideological kool-aid, he sees a newly-born baby as being his replacement. In the bedroom, Maddie tells her son otherwise, that he can't be supplanted, but this is exactly what the movie intimates, and believes. Earlier in the film, his best friend's grandfather tells the sick boy about how he was "handpicked by God" and "chosen for the role of a lifetime". "Dying is Fine", in a sense, because God's will and plan can't be cross-examined under the strictest sense of church dogma. But Tyler couldn't be faulted if he changed his mind about death, echoing the John Ryan Pike(of Ra Ra Riot) line: "You know that dying is fine, but maybe I wouldn't like death if death were good." Expand
  2. BenA
    Apr 15, 2010
    0
    This film finally made me realize that there is no god.
  3. Nov 10, 2010
    1
    Oy Vey; we should have known better. My girlfriend (who is spiritual and somewhat religious) and I (an agnostic) rented this film because it was on sale but couldn't get through the whole thing. There is a group of (probably mostly church-going) people who will like -or love- this movie, but we found it preachy, pious, proselytizing, and all too predictable.
Metascore
31

Generally unfavorable reviews - based on 7 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 7
  2. Negative: 3 out of 7
  1. 38
    Good looking (it was filmed in Winter Garden) but slow and bland, this faith-based tear-jerker is a depressingly unemotional affair, with writing and some of the acting so flat that even its emotionally loaded situations can’t inspire waterworks.
  2. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    40
    While only the converted will likely see the redemption behind the manipulation, picture delivers a strong enough dose of spiritual saccharine to yield solid if not heavenly returns from its trusty target audience.
  3. Letters to God is far too simplistic and pandering to find success outside of the targeted church-going family moviegoers it’s hoping to reach.