Wellspring Media | Release Date: November 24, 2004
7.9
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 15 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
13
Mixed:
0
Negative:
2
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9
lodizal.Apr 15, 2005
This is a brilliant film.
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10
VinceH.Feb 6, 2005
No review necessary. He is the greatest French filmmaker since Bresson, and certainly the most profound and influential of the past 50 years. See this movie at all costs if it is playing anywhere within 50 miles of you.
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10
ManoelM.Jan 4, 2005
Spetacular!! GODard is GOD of cinema!!
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9
JaredSSOct 8, 2005
Beautiful...left me speechless, literally.
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10
AmyAug 1, 2009
I give Maestro Godard a 10-infinity for this masterpiece. Forever the experimentalist, he creates a symphonic fragment that also seems like a visual jaunt through Faulkner's Sound and Fury. It is a provocative examination of reality and I give Maestro Godard a 10-infinity for this masterpiece. Forever the experimentalist, he creates a symphonic fragment that also seems like a visual jaunt through Faulkner's Sound and Fury. It is a provocative examination of reality and something else. We are left to decide where we are. Expand
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9
FredL.Dec 12, 2004
Had the good fortune to see the new Goddard film, Notre Musique, when it opened in D.C. this past Friday at the new Landmark E Street Theater (a plush cineplex for art films...........I think my days at Dupont Circle are numbered!) At age Had the good fortune to see the new Goddard film, Notre Musique, when it opened in D.C. this past Friday at the new Landmark E Street Theater (a plush cineplex for art films...........I think my days at Dupont Circle are numbered!) At age 74, Goddard still retains his enfant terrible energy from the old days; ever the iconoclast, he provokes us, and forces us to take a fresh look at our shared societal assumptions that make our world violent and absurd. While I agree with Thomson (see review above) that the film involves a poetic and philosophical narrative on humankind's penchant for war, I believe Goddard goes many layers below, and explores the dichotomous thinking and tunnel vision which compels humanity to see humans and human events outside of their natural context, which is their relativistic nature. The point compels: when we lose our sense of relationship to each other (and ourselves), the inevitable result is violence. From a psychological perspective, Goddard might well be discussing the toxic phenomenon of projective identification. Whether as individuals or whole societies, we identify with those aspects of ourselves for which we are proud, and deny that which makes us feel guilty or ashamed. In our dealings with others, we project those unwanted aspects onto others, and then persecute those for that which we find intolerable within ourselves. And as a perverse coup de grace, those who are the targets of the projections, if sufficiently powerful, might actually act out the projections, and act in ways that are usually inconsistent with their natures (e.g. a normally compassionate individual suddenly becomes rageful and judgmental). Goddard, playing himself, discusses this concept within a basic element of the film shot: shot/reverse angle. When he presents photographs of different individuals in similar poses, we see the evident difference (man and woman in two photos), but might overlook that the two individuals contain exactly the same bearing. Hence, the irony: the greater our difference, the more possible the similarity if we only saw. But we don't see, and operating from the surface, we hate, persecute, maim, and kill. This concept can explain marital violence, self-hatred (despising ourselves for our unwanted parts), racial discrimination, sexism, and wars between nations. As we lose our sense of our relative nature in relationship to each other, the more likely we are to expedite our own demise. Even in Heaven, one of the main characters ascends to a bucolic setting, which the U.S. Marines surround and guard with barbed wire and guns to the sound of their hymn. For Goddard, even our contradictions await us in the beyond. Expand
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9
GloriaM.Feb 25, 2005
At age 75, Godard is still capable of redefining cinema. His rereading of shot-reverse shot is brilliant and inspiring. What a marvellous artist.
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10
NigelD.Dec 16, 2006
Sublime, dense and illuminating. Godard's creates a symphonic fugue of parallels and associations, dualities and ironies, struggling towards the light.
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