User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 5 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 5
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 5
  3. Negative: 1 out of 5
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  1. Mike
    Nov 24, 2006
    3
    I really wanted to like this movie, but I didn't. Amateurish acting, one-dimensional and mostly uninteresting characters, and an unexceptional story poorly told all contributed to my disappointment. Whereas The Full Monty provided believably real people finding a novel solutions to routine problems, Opal Dream had wooden actors finding routine solutions to unbelievable problems. I I really wanted to like this movie, but I didn't. Amateurish acting, one-dimensional and mostly uninteresting characters, and an unexceptional story poorly told all contributed to my disappointment. Whereas The Full Monty provided believably real people finding a novel solutions to routine problems, Opal Dream had wooden actors finding routine solutions to unbelievable problems. I like a sappy cryer as much as anyone. This one just didn't work. Expand
Metascore
56

Mixed or average reviews - based on 15 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 15
  2. Negative: 0 out of 15
  1. Reviewed by: Megan Lehmann
    60
    A fanciful wisp of a film that feels slight at times. It's based on the slender novella "Pobby and Dingan," by Ben Rice, who also co-wrote the screenplay. Yet it winds up making some keen observations on the power of imagination.
  2. Reviewed by: Jay Weissberg
    50
    From the first frames, when lollypops are offered to the camera, there's no escaping the saccharine miasma of whimsy enveloping Peter Cattaneo's Opal Dream.
  3. Reviewed by: Ella Taylor
    40
    Rush screaming from anything that announces itself as "a movie for children and grown-ups of all ages." Slight and shamelessly saccharine, Opal Dream is devoted to the proposition that it takes an Australian-outback village to validate the imaginary friends of a blond child who is too sensitive for this world but not, alas, for this sappy movie.