Ran

User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 70 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 59 out of 70
  2. Negative: 5 out of 70

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User Reviews

  1. DanC.
    May 5, 2004
    10
    Akira Kurosawa is a genius!
  2. DanielZ.
    Apr 16, 2003
    10
    A later film by Akira, the film shows off his maturiuty and his true dedication to movie-making!! A master piece!!
  3. Mr.Hankey
    Mar 22, 2006
    10
    Akira Kurosawa was a visionary his work was the best a japanese director has ever put out. Yes this is based on King Lear and is a genius copy as well. The sequences of violence show the different customs that japan had and also the conflict between the sons and the father was shown amazingly. The fact is you will never find a better japanese film besides Ran and Seven Samurai in your Akira Kurosawa was a visionary his work was the best a japanese director has ever put out. Yes this is based on King Lear and is a genius copy as well. The sequences of violence show the different customs that japan had and also the conflict between the sons and the father was shown amazingly. The fact is you will never find a better japanese film besides Ran and Seven Samurai in your life and if you do you better post a review because I would like to know. Collapse
  4. DavidB.
    Aug 23, 2003
    10
    Chuck steven knows nothing about Kurosawa or what this man did. This is one of his greatest films behind the seven samurai. It is just that we are ignorant americans who would rather see trash than enjoy art.
  5. Apr 8, 2013
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Akira Kurosawa's final epic, Ran, takes on William Shakespeare's King Lear. To me, from head to toe, this Kurosawa's picture which symbolizes downfall is absolute stunning such gorgeousness in a film is utterly rare, and of course, it is one of the Kurosawa's many best films. Ran is a success having nominated for Academy Awards for best art direction, best cinematography, best costume design and best direction and won one. Ran was also nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

    I repeat this Ran, from head to toe, is absolutely stunning, and of course this movie is perfect. The film's cinematography, which is top notch, is a killer. The way Kurosawa captured the images of burning castle, a moving horses, dead soldiers, battle scenes are all undeniably respectable, and sublime too, and one great example would be the scenes where the attack of the third castle was occurring. Very much in evidence that Kurosawa's talent in film-making is transcending. The film's script which was being written by Kurosawa himself, Hideo Oguni and Masato Ide is yet admirable. The exploitation on poetic lines are proved to be effective and fitting for the movie.

    One would see great performances in Ran. Good acting by the players, but to me, the two actors who stood up above the rest are Tatsuya Nakadai and Mieko Harada. Tatsuya Nakadai plays the great lord Tatsuya Nakadai. The great lord is old, fragile and somewhat defenseless and the character is well characterized by him. Mieko Harada plays a female villain Lady Kaede, whose character is hungry for revenge. Her amazing performance which is raw and gripping, plays a very important part for the success of the movie.

    Surely there are several movie elements which are worthy to be carried out for discussions, but to me, the main highlight of Ran is its cinematography, and it is one hell of a show.

    [10/10]

    Facebook (http://facebook.com/alex.desmall) Twitter (@Alex_DeSmall) (http://www.rottentomatoes.com/member/AlexDesmall)
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  6. PatC.
    Jan 5, 2004
    9
    It's hard to go wrong with King Lear, the perfect drama with all the elements of personal and political conflict. But the emphasis shifts to the spectacle of moving units of different color-themed troops about, overshadowing the laborously developed characters. In the "Seven Samurai" and "Hidden Fortress," Kurosawa didn't let the action overshadow the characters.
  7. YoonC.
    Sep 21, 2003
    9
    The first 50 minutes are among the greatest Kurosawa ever filmed. The battle scene that climaxes the story into the next stage is perhaps the most brilliant meshing of the epic beauty and the sheer horror of grand warfare. It's also a vision of cold war between Hidetora's two sons. Though ostensibly defeating Hidetora's men, they are clearly flexing their military muscles The first 50 minutes are among the greatest Kurosawa ever filmed. The battle scene that climaxes the story into the next stage is perhaps the most brilliant meshing of the epic beauty and the sheer horror of grand warfare. It's also a vision of cold war between Hidetora's two sons. Though ostensibly defeating Hidetora's men, they are clearly flexing their military muscles at one another. However, following this scene Hidetora becomes a zero, just a white face painted Noh abstraction slumped in self pity and the movie lacks a dramatic center. Still, the many intrigues among the powers-that-be for supreme power, vengeance, and personal vanity keep it moving forward and culminates in a grand finale. Expand
  8. Mar 21, 2016
    9
    What makes Ran any different? Is it from how you see it? If it is, you probably have to step up your game (or movie as I say) because Ran is an amazing movie worth seeing twice.
  9. PeterR.R.
    Jan 25, 2001
    8
    Not the best of Kurosawa's films. Still, even at his worst, the old master had a firm grasp on the story.
Metascore
96

Universal acclaim - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
  1. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Mar 13, 2016
    100
    Ran is a great, glorious achievement.
  2. Charlotte Observer
    Reviewed by: Lawrence Toppman
    Mar 13, 2016
    100
    All that matters is that emotions be real, and so they are: wracking grief, harrowing madness, unquenchable hate. Composers have tried and failed to turn "Lear" into a workable opera, but Kurosawa has found the visual equivalent. Yet the last image of a man, solitary and silent, is more haunting than all the destruction. [10 Aug 2001, p.7E]
  3. Reviewed by: Vincent Canby
    Mar 13, 2016
    100
    Though big in physical scope and of a beauty that suggests a kind of drunken, barbaric lyricism, ''Ran'' has the terrible logic and clarity of a morality tale seen in tight close-up, of a myth that, while being utterly specific and particular in its time and place, remains ageless, infinitely adaptable.