Metascore
58

Mixed or average reviews - based on 35 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 35
  2. Negative: 1 out of 35
  1. Reviewed by: Bill Weber
    Mar 9, 2012
    25
    The ill use made of the stars' charms in this initially strained, then egregiously dopey mushfest can likely be credited to market-tested notions of modern popular romance.
User Score
6.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 54 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 17
  2. Negative: 1 out of 17
  1. Apr 3, 2012
    6
    Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is smarter than your average rom-com, wittier, and has just enough to say to give it some substance. The story is really about the relationship between Jones and Talbot. But what their affair has emotionally, it lacks in physical spark and chemistry for all the fuss. Thus, there is a lot of talk about the fishing project, and a lot of talk about their feelings, making for a rom-com that's light on visuals, heavy on dialog. Full review on my blog. Full Review »
  2. Mar 23, 2012
    4
    An Arab sheikh with more money than sense wants to import the sport and/or lifestyle of salmon fishing from cold and rainy Scotland to the barren desert of Yemen. In the meantime, the British government is floundering from scandal to scandal and greedily seizes upon the idea of a cultural rapprochement between the West and the Arab world through this fishing enterprise; it is even better that the sheik is willing to foot the entire bill. The messy details will be filled in by the Fisheries Department representative Dr. Alfred Jones (Ewan McGregor) and an investment rep for the sheikh, Ms. Harriet Chetwode-Talbot (Emily Blunt).

    Naturally, Dr. Jones is incredulous that anyone would think it feasible to move 10,000 salmon from Scotland to Yemen and considers his assignment a foolâ
    Full Review »
  3. Mar 8, 2014
    5
    Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is a mildly entertaining romantic comedy. Unfortunately, it's uniqueness is undercut by the heavy use of typical genre cliches and some eye-rolling plot contrivances. Meh. Full Review »