Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 11 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 11
  2. Negative: 0 out of 11
  1. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Jul 19, 2012
    80
    With a very simple premise, rapper Ice-T – this film's presenter and co-director with Andy Baybutt – has created a very enjoyable and often fascinating movie.
  2. Reviewed by: David Hughes
    Jul 16, 2012
    80
    An extremely interesting insight, proving that rap music is an art form in its own right.
  3. Reviewed by: Jonathan Crocker
    Jul 12, 2012
    60
    Freestyle, funny but finally just too repetitive, Ice's affectionate home-movie needed someone to structure it into a deeper documentary.
  4. Reviewed by: Kevin C. Johnson
    Jun 15, 2012
    75
    Ice-T delivers a love letter to hip-hop with Something from Nothing: The Art of Rap.
  5. Reviewed by: Sara Stewart
    Jun 15, 2012
    63
    T's formulaic interview style gives the proceedings a bit of a student-project vibe - perhaps understandable for a guy who clearly thinks artists should always be open to learning more.
  6. Reviewed by: Chris Vognar
    Jun 14, 2012
    75
    The Art of Rap was made by a hip-hop fiend for hip-hop fiends. I fit the description, and it's difficult for me to approach the film as an outsider. But if novices can make it through the barrage of interviews with artists they don't know, they'll learn plenty about a craft still grossly misrepresented by the mass media.
  7. Reviewed by: Nicolas Rapold
    Jun 14, 2012
    70
    This is a film that does sweat the technique, with at times illuminating and spirited results.
  8. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Jun 14, 2012
    60
    The faces and voices are endlessly compelling as they talk about what inspires them to lay down beats and recall the early days in New York. Ice-T, disentangled from acting, makes himself a fine focal point.
  9. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Jun 14, 2012
    63
    The interviews are often revealing and funny. And much of the music is tremendous.
  10. Reviewed by: Justin Lowe
    Jun 13, 2012
    70
    An insightful film about the creative talents that have made hip-hop an original, enduring American musical tradition.
  11. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Jun 13, 2012
    60
    The general takeaway, occasionally swaddled in pot clouds and boisterous laughter, is that verse-slinging requires serious thought and planning.
User Score
5.7

Mixed or average reviews- based on 6 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 4
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 4
  3. Negative: 2 out of 4
  1. Jun 17, 2012
    0
    I really wanted to like this movie. I probably would have a different opinion had it not been for the 1000+ times the "n" word was used. C'monI really wanted to like this movie. I probably would have a different opinion had it not been for the 1000+ times the "n" word was used. C'mon rappers, find a way to express your art. Full Review »
  2. Jul 12, 2014
    7
    Simple, good documentary, with some of the old heads saying some things about theSimple, good documentary, with some of the old heads saying some things about the whole art form Full Review »
  3. Dec 24, 2013
    7
    Although I found the whole documentary quite interesting, it kinda felt fragmentary to me.
    Sort of a puzzle (to use Eminem's words) lacking
    Although I found the whole documentary quite interesting, it kinda felt fragmentary to me.
    Sort of a puzzle (to use Eminem's words) lacking of some useful-to-join-the-ensemble piece, but this could easily be reconnected to the wild, smoky, gutty nature of hip-hop itself. Not really a documentary stricto sensu, rather an enjoyable peeping of rap legends sharing some good time together and explaining their subjective point of view over the evolution of the movement and their rhymes-crafting techniques. In the end, I didn't find the curse offensive, instead, I would have felt insulted by the use of a false polished and politically correct language, only made up for the camera.
    Full Review »