New Yorker Films | Release Date: October 6, 2000
8.2
USER SCORE
Universal acclaim based on 23 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
20
Mixed:
0
Negative:
3
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10
Megi-chan^_^Aug 3, 2002
Speechless....... _-_
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10
PaulB.Apr 8, 2006
Gorgeous cinematography and hypnotic sound design. Structurally perfect in its controlled ambiguity. If you liked this film, you should also check out Claire Denis' "Beau Travail."
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10
JackOct 10, 2002
Mysterious, enigmatic, even clinical. A strange movie that has more power than the story would suggest.
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10
FeliciaS.Nov 20, 2002
I just love it when Sozaburo gets f..ked. He's just laying there like a ragdoll, taking it... Now that's art! Oh, and I'm a 16 years old grrrl from Sweden by the way...
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10
ShawnMar 19, 2003
I would rate this as one of THE best films I've seen. Although a little perplexing at the end, after much thought (I pondered the ins and outs for an extensive time), I think I've come to some better understanding about the story. I would rate this as one of THE best films I've seen. Although a little perplexing at the end, after much thought (I pondered the ins and outs for an extensive time), I think I've come to some better understanding about the story. Of course, the mere visual representaton of homosexuality in mid 19th C. Japan is praiseworthy. Great depth and insight on what is likely to be unknown. Expand
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10
FirstFeb 27, 2005
Capt Okita is more important to the plot than I first realized. The key to many seemingly unconnected details is in the "dream" sequence, in which Hijikawa reflects on the story "A Vow Between Two Men," recounted by Okita (Soji). Three Capt Okita is more important to the plot than I first realized. The key to many seemingly unconnected details is in the "dream" sequence, in which Hijikawa reflects on the story "A Vow Between Two Men," recounted by Okita (Soji). Three different interpretations: Hijikawa's personal desires, what will happen in reality, his insight into Kano's desires. The conversation between Okita and Hijikawa as they wait to observe Kano kill Tashiro, has the same surprising directness as in H's relationship to Cmdr Kondo. So many parallels in this film! So many levels of meaning! No wonder it confounds people unaccustomed to subtitled films: they miss the more interesting points and symbolism. Expand
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10
Snowy_WhiteOct 16, 2002
Keeps you wondering...
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10
RoyF.Nov 24, 2001
Superb.
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9
DavidNov 17, 2002
Graphically charming, rich scenes and wonderfully choreographed fighting scenes, make this movie superb. The ending has 2 possibilities I have yet to figure out.
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9
YoonC.Sep 21, 2003
Oshima's film explores the tension between the highly aesthetisized culture of Japan(yin) and the brutal martial code of the warrior(yang). The central character, the androgynous samurai--deadly and elegant--, represents and triggers Oshima's film explores the tension between the highly aesthetisized culture of Japan(yin) and the brutal martial code of the warrior(yang). The central character, the androgynous samurai--deadly and elegant--, represents and triggers the many degrees of suppressed and twisted emotions in the psyche of Japanese culture which perhaps poeticized violence more than any other culture. At times, a study of tribal pagan mentality, and at other times finely calligraphied visual haikus, this is a tour-de-force, perhaps Oshima's greatest film since Merry X-mas Mr Lawrence. Expand
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8
RichardSep 9, 2002
A puzzler, due to the ambiguous motives of its catalyst character, but compelling and well-done.
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