Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 26 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 26
  2. Negative: 1 out of 26
  1. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Apr 18, 2013
    88
    Brannigan is terrific as Robbie, and the entire supporting cast is superb.
  2. Reviewed by: Farran Smith Nehme
    Apr 11, 2013
    88
    At age 76, Loach also decided to offer his characters, and audience, some hope — at the bottom of a glass.
  3. Reviewed by: Steven Boone
    Apr 5, 2013
    88
    Loach's realism always carries a distinct sense of humor, volatility and, most alarmingly in this hypercapitalist new century, a socialist passion for The People.
  4. Reviewed by: Grant Butler
    Apr 5, 2013
    83
    Although some of the accents are so thick it's difficult to understand the dialogue (where are the subtitles when we need them?) the performances feel genuine.
  5. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Apr 11, 2013
    80
    The setting and themes are pure Loach, and he’s handled comic scenarios with skill before. But he and his longtime screenwriter, Paul Laverty, have added a lighthearted buoyancy — enhanced by a spirited if obvious soundtrack — that might lead some to call this a feel-good crowd-pleaser.
  6. 80
    The Angels’ Share is a rare upbeat Ken Loach comedy — and a wee dram of bliss. Set in Scotland, it has a blessedly funny overture.
  7. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Mar 2, 2013
    80
    Ken Loach's latest collaboration with screenwriter Paul Laverty is warm, funny and good-natured. It's a freewheeling social-realist caper – unworldly and at times almost childlike.
  8. Reviewed by: Staff [Not Credited]
    Mar 2, 2013
    80
    For all its bleak edges, The Angels’ Share warms like a sip of the good stuff.
  9. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    May 3, 2013
    75
    At its heart, this is a compassionate character study. Robbie’s tenderness toward his son and his remorse for a street fight are the raw ingredients of a ripening consciousness.
  10. Reviewed by: Tom Russo
    Apr 25, 2013
    75
    Our advice: Forgive any conflicting elements and just drink them right down. They might be a peculiar blend, but they’re well crafted, just as you’d expect from Loach.
  11. Reviewed by: Ella Taylor
    Apr 11, 2013
    75
    Leaving this improbably feel-good movie, you'll wish Robbie all the luck in the world, and the mentors to go with it.
  12. Reviewed by: Mike D'Angelo
    Apr 10, 2013
    75
    The cast is immensely appealing, the heist is ingenious, and the collision of hardscrabble working-class kids and Sideways-style alcohol snobs generates steady laughs, though somewhat predictable ones.
  13. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Apr 11, 2013
    70
    The Angels' Share leaves a warm glow.
  14. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Apr 11, 2013
    70
    Ken Loach better watch out. From the start of his illustrious career his name has been synonymous with left-wing politics expressed in remarkably fine, consistently serious social-realist dramas, most of them set in England or Scotland. Now he has gone and directed a comedy from a script by his longtime collaborator Paul Laverty, and it's so delightful that his fans will be clamoring for more.
  15. Reviewed by: Leslie Felperin
    Apr 5, 2013
    70
    An amiable comedy about young Glaswegian roughnecks discovering the world of whisky, The Angels’ Share finds helmer Ken Loach and long-term screenwriting partner Paul Laverty in better, breezier form than their rebarbative prior effort, “Route Irish.”
  16. Reviewed by: Stephen Dalton
    Mar 2, 2013
    70
    A few clumsy touches do not seriously diminish the charm of a film that is ultimately a heart-warming celebration of kindness, friendship and forgiveness. Like a fine whisky, the angry old man of British social realism seems to be mellowing with age. It suits him.
  17. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Apr 12, 2013
    67
    The film itself vaporizes before your eyes, but it’s likable. Given its unstable mishmash of thuggery and whimsy, that’s something of an achievement.
  18. Reviewed by: Stephen Holden
    Apr 11, 2013
    60
    Watching it is like receiving a hard slap in the face from someone who expects you to laugh it off, even though the sting lingers.
  19. Reviewed by: Eric Hynes
    Apr 9, 2013
    60
    Loach coaxes an endearingly poised performance out of nonprofessional Brannigan, and largely sells these scuffling characters as neither hopeless nor heroic—just terribly human.
  20. Reviewed by: Kim Newman
    Mar 2, 2013
    60
    Like good whisky, Loach is mellowing and becoming subtler with age — though a swift chug still has a bit of a kick.
  21. Reviewed by: Michael Posner
    May 17, 2013
    50
    There might be a pretty good film lurking in this latest dramedy from the veteran Scottish directing-writing team of Ken Loach and Paul Laverty. I use the conditional because at least half the dialogue is delivered in a Glaswegian Scots so thick, it might as well have been Urdu.
  22. Reviewed by: Calum Marsh
    Apr 9, 2013
    50
    When The Angels' Share suddenly transforms, in its final act, into a kind of farcical heist picture, that fleeting slapstick tendency wins out, regrettably diminishing the film's social consciousness in the process.
  23. Reviewed by: Glenn Heath Jr.
    Apr 5, 2013
    50
    Ken Loach's breezy scribble about lowlife redemption and drunken buffoonery isn't so much heavy-handed as it is charmingly weightless.
  24. Mar 2, 2013
    42
    Some good laughs and a passable air of bonhomie do nothing to cover up the fact that The Angels’ Share is totally lightweight and distractingly underdone.
  25. Reviewed by: Leah Churner
    May 1, 2013
    40
    I’m afraid there’s more than 2% evaporation going on in Loach’s latest.
  26. Reviewed by: Jordan Hoffman
    Apr 10, 2013
    30
    The prolific 76-year-old British creator of character-rich, social dramas steeped in natural realism (usually) has whiffed it and whiffed it hard with this one. It’s not that it’s just “lesser Loach.” It is, in my opinion at least, humiliating.
User Score
7.0

Generally favorable reviews- based on 14 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. May 14, 2013
    6
    After he becomes a father, a bloke with a violent temper (Paul Brannigan) tries to change his behavior. He teams up with his community serviceAfter he becomes a father, a bloke with a violent temper (Paul Brannigan) tries to change his behavior. He teams up with his community service pals to steal a valuable whisky. His dilemmas provide sympathetic drama that moves to mild comedy after he teams up with the gang. Even so, his character carries the story. Director Ken Loach keeps the energy up and the performances agreeable. There's nothing exceptional about this project, but it's a charming little trip to Scotland (ironically, there are subtitles in case the brogue gets too thick). Full Review »