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88

Universal acclaim - based on 11 Critics What's this?

User Score
8.4

Universal acclaim- based on 88 Ratings

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  • Starring: ,
  • Summary: Adapted from the popular 1960s television, this is the story of Dr. Richard Kimble (Ford), who has been falsely accused and convicted of his wife's murder.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 11
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 11
  3. Negative: 0 out of 11
  1. Turns out to be a smashing success, a juggernaut of an action-adventure saga that owes noithing to the past. To put it simply, thi is a home run. [6 August 1993, p. C1]
  2. 100
    A tense, taut and expert thriller that becomes something more than that, an allegory about an innocent man in a world prepared to crush him.
  3. Reviewed by: Martin Chilton
    Nov 26, 2013
    100
    What makes the film so special is that Ford and Tommy Lee Jones (as his chief pursuer, US Marshal Samuel Gerard) are such beautifully matched adversaries.
  4. 90
    It's a pleasure to find a thriller fulfilling its duties with such gusto: the emotions ring solid, the script finds time to relax into backchat, and for once the stunts look like acts of desperation rather than shows of prowess.
  5. 80
    A flurry of stunts, close shaves and deeds of desperate daring, it easily transcends its television origins to become a stylish pacemaker-buster.
  6. Though it's a good half hour too long, this belated, overblown spin-off of the 60s TV show otherwise adds up to a pretty good suspense thriller.
  7. 67
    As far as the chase genre goes, there have been worse films (better ones, too).

See all 11 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 22
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 22
  3. Negative: 1 out of 22
  1. Sep 29, 2013
    10
    The Fugitive is one of the best Harrison Ford movies, as well as definitely being on my Top 20 list. This movie is smart, and suspense and good performances make this movie. The way it moves from shot to shot and Dr. Kimble's quick thinking create a very intriguing movie. Watch it, and you'll see what I mean. Expand
  2. Sep 22, 2014
    10
    A timeless classic with brilliant acting from Ford and Jones. The action also packs a wallop.
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  3. Nov 28, 2012
    10
    It's rousing, fast-paced, tense as all hell, and - most importantly - unshakable. "The Fugitive" is, in short, the perfect man-on-the-run thriller.
  4. Oct 10, 2011
    8
    Most people use The Fugitive as an example of how a perfect chase film should be but in all honesty I've seen better (District 9 for example). However that is not to say that The Fugitive isn't a quality film from start to finish. It does what its supposed to do and is incredibly entertaining while it is doing it. The downside of the fugitive is it seems to be made of scenes that the director didn't quite know where to put with scenes talking about Richard Kimble's (Harrison Ford) intelligence being slotted in quite late in the film because it slowed down the pace so the viewer could take a breath. This kind of mix match of scenes doesn't prove too much of a problem but if you want to emphasise your characters intelligence, you might want to do it at the beginning instead of waiting until he has been on the run for 70 minutes of a 2 hour film. That being said, I enjoyed the mystery novel pace, the glacial reveals of key nuggets of information as the reason behind Kimble's framing come together nicely for one hell of a finale. When it comes to The Fugitive most people will talk about the scene on the dam or Tommy Lee Jones' portrayal of Samuel Gerard but the best part of the film in my opinion is the beginning, the moments before he starts running. Not only does it set up Kimble's character so that there is not a moment you think he killed his wife but it also gives you reason to like him while also showing he isn't perfect. He is quick to anger but incredibly kind, he is the Everyman kind of hero the film needed and Ford portrays him as such but also brings subtle quirks to the character. The film commences the chase with some great effects and from that moment on the film continues to build in tension until the very end with there being stand out sequences (such as the one on St Patricks Day) leading to a cracking final act.
    Despite the fact he was the sole Oscar winner for the film, it should be said that he deserved it with his character being something else, a great performance that still impresses today. Overall a excellent thriller but it could have used a more coherent idea of what the film should look like in the end with scenes feeling out of place or unnecessary for no good reason.
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  5. Oct 25, 2013
    8
    An intricate and thoughtful thriller, 'The Fugitive' is a well made film based on the TV series. Though all of it comes from the dramatic and fascinating true story of Sam Shepard and his wrongful conviction, which shows how the law can not always be correct. Tommy Lee Jones brings the comedic piece as the sardonic yet well-trained marshal. I liked the movie, and I could watch it over about ten times before becoming tire of it. Expand
  6. Jan 16, 2012
    8
    Is it just me...

    ...Or are all American thrillers basically the same movie, just slightly altered and repackaged each time? Okay, I know at
    heart that there are some obvious details in each film that make it different to ones before it, but I can't be the only one who's thought that, by simply pulling a bunch of dangerous-sounding buzz words out of the air (words like 'prosecution', 'corruption', 'mistaken identity' and 'manhunt') I could form the foundation of the next big action thriller. So why, then, is Andrew Davis' The Fugitive, a film that contains all these base ingredients and more, so much fun to watch? Short answer: a solid story, good acting and a cast of characters that fit into their respective roles like a favourite pair of pyjamas. Long answer: by all means, read on.

    Harrison Ford is Dr. Richard Kimble, a respected man sentenced to prison for murdering his wife, despite being adamant that it was not him, but a mysterious one-armed man, who committed the crime. On the bus ride to the big house, the other prisoners stage a daring escape, allowing Kimble to flee and begin a life of anonymity whilst seeking out the real killer. That is, until he crosses paths with Sam Gerard (Tommy Lee Jones), a hard-nosed US Marshal who cares not for Kimble's excuses, and whose only concern is restoring the status quo.

    Excluding the excellent Indiana Jones trilogy (notice I've left out the fourth instalment, which I refuse to mention by name), Ford has made this genre his forte, making him a natural fit for the desperate, determined Kimble. Jones earns the Best Supporting Actor Oscar by playing the typical Jones role to great effect: a no-nonsense tough guy with a sideswiping sense of humour. And Joe Pantoliano, best known as Ralph Cifaretto (or Cypher, if you're no Sopranos fan) makes under-appreciated contributions as Gerard's right-hand man.

    Suspense is on high supply throughout. My personal favourite is Kimble's attempt to hide in plain sight at the hospital, a tense and dramatic set piece that sets a paranoid tone for the rest of the film. But there is a plethora of energetic, 'edge-of-your-seat' moments to satisfy film connoisseurs and action junkies alike, including the sewer chase, the St. Patrick's Day parade and the rooftop climax, all of which comply with the conventions of an action thriller nicely against the backdrop of a bleak, but not quite noir, Chicago CBD.

    Speaking of conventions, it's clear that Davis has made a tight pace the top priority in The Fugitive, as the entire film is determined to remove any and all obstacles that would otherwise slow the movie down. Character development is restricted mainly to Ford's character, but is sprinkled in just enough to keep the rest of the cast from looking like cardboard cut-outs. But most pleasing was the omission of a romantic subplot. At different times during production, both Julianne Moore and Jane Lynch were scripted as Kimble's love interest. Despite the obvious pitfalls this would create from a logical perspective (considering Kimble spends the whole movie trying to avenge his beloved wife), it also sounds like the director has dodged a minefield of clichés by avoiding the beaten path; something I am very grateful for.

    Admittedly, the film becomes a little convoluted in the third act. Depending on how much you've enjoyed The Fugitive, this alone might be enough to warrant a second viewing, but otherwise it's nothing that a quick trip to the IMDb won't fix. If you're looking for a theme to take away, I suppose the movie could act as an exposition of human nature in desperate times. However, I doubt that was on the agenda during filming, and so the film should instead be enjoyed as was intended: an absorbing, high-drama roller-coaster, which I expect will remain a staple of this genre for many decades to come.

    *There's nothing I love more than a bit of feedback, good or bad. So drop me a line on jnatsis@iprimus.com.au and let me know what you thought of my review.*
    Expand
  7. JaredC.
    Sep 5, 2007
    0
    The Fugitive is a gripping interest of plot, but it's adventure is very weak, while its story is horrible because of the horrible acting performed by Harrison Ford, Matt Damon is the only good actor for this kind of role. Anyway, the movie still really sucked, the first 10 minutes is boring, while the rest is fun. But it's a huge letdown because it has a bad taste, and the feel is uncomfortable. You have to pay attention hard to find the interest. Director Andrew David never does well. No blame to anyone else, just Andrew Davis is a director that never makes the cut. Expand

See all 22 User Reviews

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