Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 23 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 23
  2. Negative: 1 out of 23
  1. 50
    I'm not sure the movie should have pumped up the melodrama to get us more interested, but something might have helped.
  2. 50
    Overall, The Last September is a real snooze.
  3. The movie doesn't have much more get-up-and-go than the characters, but solid performances and richly textured camera work keep it involving most of the way through.
  4. There's something Slavic about Warner's storytelling.
  5. More interesting for the world it evokes rather than the drama that unfolds.
  6. A luminous, piercing film from the Elizabeth Bowen novel, richly evokes a world of privilege on the verge of disintegration.
  7. Not even the rich and nuanced performances of stage veterans Smith, Gambon, and Birkin can save this British period drama from languishing amid the story's unfocused longings and unrealistic musings.
  8. Saga too arty for own good.
  9. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    90
    Like hard-edged "Masterpiece Theater."
  10. A botched job: the various relationships and personal histories of the characters are never made clear, the last act is glaringly disjointed, the writing and direction are all over the map.
  11. Reviewed by: Jay Carr
    100
    A gorgeous autumnal period piece that catches a vanishing proprietary class on the eve of its extinction in Ireland in 1920.
  12. Instead of a sweeping epic, this adaptation of a novel by Elizabeth Bowen is much quieter, a work perhaps too understated and stereotypical for its own good.
  13. 70
    This gorgeous expressionist drama makes the comparisons so effectively at the outset that by the end they seem belabored.
  14. The quality of acting in September, coupled with Idziak's images, warrant a visit.
  15. 90
    Impeccably acted by a fine ensemble cast, it's a sheer pleasure to behold.
  16. Undeniable asset of an A list cast.
  17. 88
    One of those rare movies that manages to maintain the hushed intensity and claustrophobic anxiety that is normally associated with theater or prose.
  18. Reviewed by: Steve Simels
    50
    There's a certain built-in poignance to the end-of-an-era proceedings here, regardless of how frostily they're dramatized.
  19. 80
    A Melancholy Delight. Its pacing will undoubtedly seem too deliberate to some, but I found first-time director Deborah Warner's The Last September a delight from beginning to end.
  20. 70
    The film's pathos lies not with people who have justice on their side, but with those who don't know where they belong.
  21. 75
    Sad confusions and emotional disconnections are what the story is all about.
  22. There's enough caustic wit, romance and dizzy whimsy to make The Last September, if not deep, at least diverting.
  23. Reviewed by: Chuck Wilson
    90
    This is one of those rare times when a credit-heavy gathering of top film talents actually manages to produce a work of art.

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