The Legend of Zorro

The Legend of Zorro Image
Metascore
47

Mixed or average reviews - based on 33 Critics What's this?

User Score
4.9

Mixed or average reviews- based on 81 Ratings

Your Score
0 out of 10
Rate this:
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • Starring: ,
  • Summary: The Legend of Zorro reunites stars Antonio Banderas and Catherine Zeta-Jones with director Martin Campbell for a sequel to their 1995 action hit "The Mask of Zorro."

Trailer

Please enter your birth date to continue:
You are not allowed to view this material at this time.
Autoplay: On | Off

Where To Watch

Stream On
Stream On
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 33
  2. Negative: 6 out of 33
  1. 90
    The picture is almost shamefully entertaining, bold and self-effacing at once: Its intelligence reveals itself as a devilish gleam, not a pompous layer of shellac. Why can't more Hollywood movies be like this one?
  2. Banderas uses all his old wiles in this well-oiled, businesslike, quite clangingly violent sequel to "The Mask of Zorro."
  3. Reviewed by: Ryan Devlin
    63
    The family dynamic, paired with a few delicious action scenes, is engaging enough that we hardly notice the fillm's major flaw, a rather flimsy and sometimes jingoistic subplot having to do with California's independence.
  4. 50
    There'll likely be more Z's in the audience than on the screen.
  5. This is a hiss-the-villain, cheer-the-hero kind of movie.
  6. 42
    Antonio Banderas and Catherine Zeta-Jones are back, as is director Martin Campbell, but the result has the all-too-common feel of an expired equine redundantly abused.
  7. 20
    There are precious few things for a Zorro fan – or a film fan, for that matter – not to loathe about The Legend of Zorro.

See all 33 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 22
  2. Negative: 6 out of 22
  1. Phantomfreak07
    Jan 25, 2006
    10
    I loved this movie. I felt a bond with Zorro when I saw 1998's Mask, and this strengthened it. I loved little Adrian Alonso (Joaquin), I loved this movie. I felt a bond with Zorro when I saw 1998's Mask, and this strengthened it. I loved little Adrian Alonso (Joaquin), he was adorable! Antonio and Catherine were stunning as always, and Sewell made a very good villain. He had the charm to keep your attention at the same time you knew he was up to something. If he were in a different role, I'd go on about him, but I'll stick with saying I liked his eyes. I did, however, question (after seeing the film) why it wasn't also rated PG13. With all the crazy action stunts and even the child swearing (so what if it was Spanish? I understood it w/o subtitles) I expected it to get a higher rating. All in all though, I loved it and can't wait till it is released on DVD. Expand
  2. FiladelfioJ.
    Dec 11, 2005
    10
    This Movie is cool very cool.
  3. AdamL.
    Nov 29, 2005
    9
    If Your Looking for a plot movie, don't waste your money. Action Lovers, This is your movie! It's almost one continues fight scene If Your Looking for a plot movie, don't waste your money. Action Lovers, This is your movie! It's almost one continues fight scene rapped up in a 2 hour spectacular. other than the -1 I gave it for the non-fight scenes that sucked, it was good! Expand
  4. chuckyo
    Oct 29, 2005
    6
    The critics' reviews are generally accurate. It has plenty of action, but, I guess you could say that the movie just isn't as sexy The critics' reviews are generally accurate. It has plenty of action, but, I guess you could say that the movie just isn't as sexy and fun as the first one was. Expand
  5. Feb 27, 2014
    6
    The Legend doesn't compare to The Mask, but is still a great Zorro movie that takes this great story beyond boundaries. What it lacks inThe Legend doesn't compare to The Mask, but is still a great Zorro movie that takes this great story beyond boundaries. What it lacks in acting and writing, it makes up for in story. Expand
  6. Mar 20, 2016
    4
    Some sequels are made too soon, while others are made too late. The Legend of Zorro, Martin Campbell's follow-up to his well-received 1998Some sequels are made too soon, while others are made too late. The Legend of Zorro, Martin Campbell's follow-up to his well-received 1998 feature, The Mask of Zorro, falls into the latter category. It's difficult to say whether the film would have been better had it gone before cameras three or four years ago but, by 2005, it feels creaky and out-of-date. The production is suffused by an almost desperate attempt to recapture the mood of its predecessor, but the tone is forced rather than natural, and the resultant production is bloated, contrived, and not very entertaining. The Mask of Zorro worked because of its engaging mix of action, romance, and comedy. The Legend of Zorro goes 0-for-3, striking out as it tries (and fails) to recapture the pleasure offered by the earlier story of the swashbuckling superhero.

    The Legend of Zorro opens in 1850, with California preparing to vote to become the 31st state. Certain forces, including those led by the racist McGivins (Nick Chinlund), will do anything to stop this, including murder and ballot theft. Enter Zorro (Antonio Banderas), the defender of the people, who punishes McGivins and ensures that the election runs smoothly. When the votes have been tabulated, Zorro doffs his mask and returns home as Don Alejandro de La Vega to his wife, Elena (Catherine Zeta-Jones), and his son, Joaquin (Adrian Alonso). An agreement with Elena would have Alejandro give up his alter-ego at this time, but he wonders if Zorro might still be needed. This leads to a heated argument, followed by a divorce. Alejandro becomes a drunkard, and Elena is wooed by a French count, Armand (Rufus Sewell), who has come to California to cultivate grapes for wine. Soon, however, it becomes clear that Armand is up to no good. He has ties to McGivins and is plotting something dastardly. It's up to Zorro to stop these two and save Elena.

    For the talent involved, The Mask of Zorro represented perfect timing. Anthony Hopkins was looking for something to show off his lighter side. Antonio Banderas used it as an opportunity to maintain his status as a star/sex symbol. And Catherine Zeta-Jones vaulted from near obscurity to the A-list (capturing Michael Douglas' attention in the process). The constellations are not as well aligned for The Legend of Zorro. Banderas hasn't been a big name for years. Zeta-Jones is no longer a fresh face. And Hopkins isn't in the movie. Moreover, the chemistry between the two leads, which was one of the highlights of the 1998 outing, has evaporated during the intervening years. Despite numerous plot contortions designed to construct the framework for an artificial resurgence of the romance between Alejandro and Elena, Banderas and Zeta-Jones no longer have the ability to generate sparks, much less fire.

    The action in The Legend of Zorro is routine. The swordfights produce little in the way of excitement or suspense. Equally lifeless are the saccharine "bonding" attempts between Alejandro and his son. The boy admires Zorro for his flair, but dislikes his father for what he perceives to be cowardice. Alejandro tries to teach his son that there are better ways than resorting to violence, but it's a lesson the movie abandons, because violence is more fun on-screen that pacifism. The Legend of Zorro is also cursed with two of the least interesting bad guys in recent memory. While McGivens and Armand are unquestionably villainous, there's nothing about them to cause audiences to hiss. They're boring. Nick Chinlund tries to do a little over-the-top ranting, but it comes across as second-rate. And Rufus Sewell fails to convince us that he's more than an effeminate fop. Never do we believe that either of these men is in Zorro's league. The question is not whether they will be toppled, but why it requires an inflated running time of more than two hours for the swashbuckler to get the job done.

    One could argue that the influx of "new" superhero movies since 1998 has made Zorro outdated. When The Mask of Zorro was released, the cinematic landscape was a superhero wasteland. Since then, we've seen the emergence of the X-Men, Spider-Man, the Hulk, Daredevil, the Fantastic Four, and (a re-imagined) Batman. It's a crowded field, and this diluted version of Zorro doesn't hold up. Zorro has a distinguished history, dating back to 1919. It's unfortunate that the latest installment of his saga makes him look like a relic who's ready for retirement.
    Expand
  7. Squall
    Dec 15, 2005
    0
    Not cool at all. Simply awful! Enough said.

See all 22 User Reviews

Trailers

Related Articles

  1. DVD/Blu-ray Release Calendar: August 2016

    DVD/Blu-ray Release Calendar: August 2016 Image
    Published: July 28, 2016
    Find a complete guide to TV and movie titles heading to Blu-ray and DVD throughout the month of August, including The Nice Guys, Keanu, The Jungle Book, The Lobster, Weiner, and more.
  2. What Movie Should I See This Weekend?

    What Movie Should I See This Weekend? Image
    Published: July 27, 2016
    Preview all of this weekend's new theatrical releases (including Jason Bourne, Nerve, Bad Moms, Indignation, and more), with Metascores and trailers for each new film.
  3. 23 Buddy Movies, Ranked From Worst to Best

    23 Buddy Movies, Ranked From Worst to Best Image
    Published: July 25, 2016
    We rank some of cinema's most notable buddy films by Metascore.
  4. What to Watch Now on Netflix

    What to Watch Now on Netflix Image
    Published: July 25, 2016
    Get a list of the best movie and TV titles recently added (and coming soon) to Netflix streaming, updated frequently. You can also find a list of titles expiring soon.