The Social Network

The Social Network Image
Metascore
95

Universal acclaim - based on 42 Critics What's this?

User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 1644 Ratings

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  • Starring: , ,
  • Summary: On a fall night in 2003, Harvard undergrad and computer programming genius Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) sits down at his computer and heatedly begins working on a new idea. In a fury of blogging and programming, what begins in his dorm room soon becomes a global social network and aOn a fall night in 2003, Harvard undergrad and computer programming genius Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) sits down at his computer and heatedly begins working on a new idea. In a fury of blogging and programming, what begins in his dorm room soon becomes a global social network and a revolution in communication. A mere six years and 500 million friends later, Mark Zuckerberg is the youngest billionaire in history... but for this entrepreneur, success leads to both personal and legal complications. [Columbia Pictures] Expand

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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 41 out of 42
  2. Negative: 0 out of 42
  1. 100
    Brilliantly entertaining and emotionally wrenching.
  2. 100
    With a thieves den of borderline-Shakespearian characters, a wickedly literate screenplay, potent direction by David Fincher, an exceptional ensemble cast and subject matter that speaks to a generation and well beyond, The Social Network is mesmerizing.
  3. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    100
    The film owes much of its success to the inspired pairing of Fincher and Sorkin.
  4. A work deeper than its nickname, "The Facebook Movie," hints at - coils around your brain. Weeks after seeing it, moments from it will haunt you.
  5. 100
    The performances, direction and writing of one of the best pictures of 2010 make this Social Network every bit as addictive, and a little chilling as well.
  6. 90
    All I can say about Timberlake's performance as the thoroughly odious, desperately seductive, textbook-case metrosexual Parker is that he brings so much reptilian fun that he unbalances the movie, almost fatally.
  7. It's an entertainingly cynical small movie. Aaron Sorkin's dialogue tumbles out so fast it's as if the characters want their brains to keep pace with their processors; they talk like they keyboard, like Fincher directs, with no time for niceties.

See all 42 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 22 out of 348
  1. Oct 1, 2010
    10
    "The Social Network" was so good I don't even know where to begin. I can't, for the life of me, think of another film in recent years that's"The Social Network" was so good I don't even know where to begin. I can't, for the life of me, think of another film in recent years that's left me so wholeheartedly satisfied by the time the credits started rolling. This is some amazing, amazing stuff we've got here folks: don't miss it for the world. Expand
  2. Jul 12, 2014
    10
    Before you see any image in the film, you hear the words of Aaron Sorkin. The film hits the ground running mid-contentious-conversation in aBefore you see any image in the film, you hear the words of Aaron Sorkin. The film hits the ground running mid-contentious-conversation in a bar between our stoic protagonist, Mark Zuckerberg, and soon to be ex-girlfriend. The movie some might refer to as “the Facebook movie,” in reality, has very little to do with Facebook itself. To me, the freshest thing "The Social Network" says about a generation on the verge of the Facebook-era is that it’s actually not very different to what’s always been true to human nature. These are characters as susceptible to their own petty whims as anyone else; they are young people of varying degrees of ego, hubris, and needs that transcend shifting technologies.

    The film’s first act breezes through with brazen lack of convention. After shooting off 10 pages of dialogue in a few minutes, a newly single Mark runs back to his Harvard dorm room to drunkenly angry-blog. In the most striking sequence in the first half of the film, a lewdly lavish party from the famous Phoenix Club is intercut with Mark hacking into his school’s network from the seclusion of his room. Like with many artists, Zuckerberg’s masterpiece was borne in the resentment of heartache.

    Jesse Eisenberg as a performer takes to Sorkin’s intricate dialogue like a snug glove, hitting each beat without fail at bullet-speed. On one level, there are things he seems to understand people in enough of a deeply profound way to be uniquely qualified to bring Facebook into the world. On the other hand, his near total lack of self-awareness makes him perpetually alienated from the rest of the world. And, every now and then, Eisenberg allows us to glimpse inside Mark’s enigmatic mind through quick and calculated cracks in the veneer.

    The first cut to one of Mark’s two legal battles occurring years later happens right after the Harvard network crashes. The cuts are jarring, at first — the world in which the depositions occur is very different from the world of the rest of the film. The characters are different people. The colors are brighter and crisper, and the soundscape is less cloudy. And, to obscure matters further, Zuckerberg immediately discredits his ex-girlfriend’s testimony of their bar conversation read out from transcripts that Sorkin himself used for research. At the end of the film, Rashida Jones, functioning as the film’s Greek chorus, confirms that 85% of emotional testimony is exaggerated and the rest is perjury. David Fincher’s camera is an unreliable narrator.

    After this, the film’s most compelling plot line— the betrayal of Eduardo — starts to come crashing down in a series of scenes leading up to his final eruption. It’s in these scenes that Andrew Garfield flexes his acting muscles (robbed blind of the Oscar, let alone the nomination), as the stakes in each scene he appears in from this point on only gets more and more intense. It starts as the team Mark Zuckerberg had assembled for Facebook convenes in Eduardo’s house in Palo Alto, unaware that Sean Parker (Mark’s celebrity crush-turned-mentor) lived across the street. Justin Timberlake might strike some as a bit of stunt casting, but it has a brilliant payoff as his superstar presence does justice to the mythology the film builds to Sean Parker. It’s a mythology that Eduardo finds deeply suspect (not wanting the company associated with his history of underage girls and drug abuse), and personally threatening.

    Eduardo Saverin is a deeply flawed character. He’s naïve, occasionally petty, and didn’t have the foresight to know the full potential of Facebook to arm it more innovative structure. But his fate is the only one in the film seemed disproportionately crueler than any of the others (until the settlement). Eduardo signs the papers, underestimating just how deep under Sean’s spell he is (illustrated in a scene where Sean gets Mark to flip off potential Case Equity investors in a robe for nothing more than personal revenge for having fired Sean). When Eduardo is invited back to celebrate one million users, he instead becomes informed of his diluted shares.

    It’s the most shocking moment in the film, and the catalyst for his emotional explosion. The film stops dead in its tracks as a mesmerizing Garfield marches down to Mark’s desk, smashes his computer, and confronts his character’s now former best friend. Eisenberg allows Garfield his moment, but he’s equally good as you can see the belated shameful realization of what had just happened. When it becomes official that Facebook has reached a million viewers, he should be happy, but the personal cost of his success his immediately and devastatingly apparent.

    He does get one final victory: his ex-girlfriend is on Facebook.
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  3. Jan 21, 2011
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. quality film one of the best ive seen , i do understand why i tiny majority dont like it, this fil is about patience and understanding but obviously some people are 'Tards' , the main character may be protentious and a bit of a show off but who wouldnt be if they can make a social network when drunk. i found it entertaining in every aspect when the film unraveled and i found it funny is some parts. but its my opinion that its good (and 95 out of 100 speaks for itself) Expand
  4. Jan 5, 2011
    9
    One of the year best movie. One of the best screenplay and best cast. The director did an outstanding job with picking directing this movie. IOne of the year best movie. One of the best screenplay and best cast. The director did an outstanding job with picking directing this movie. I would suggest this to everyone. 2010 top movie. Everybody did such a great job with their role. i don't see how anybody can hate this movie. The film was just outstanding. Expand
  5. Feb 24, 2013
    9
    The biggest of various achievements on The Social Network is directing. Mr. Fincher's work is unique and revolutionary. The editing, soundThe biggest of various achievements on The Social Network is directing. Mr. Fincher's work is unique and revolutionary. The editing, sound mixing, and fine acting made this movie a modern classic. Expand
  6. Feb 23, 2011
    8
    David Fincher in my mind, is a genius. I just watched a couple nerds hit buttons on computer and i was spellbound. This is one hell of anDavid Fincher in my mind, is a genius. I just watched a couple nerds hit buttons on computer and i was spellbound. This is one hell of an emotionally gripping picture and all though i thought the acting fell a little flat at moment I thoroughly enjoyed it. Expand
  7. Jul 31, 2015
    0
    We can't deny the phenomen of facebook but this film is about a bunch of obnoxious Young men fighting for money . It is David finchers leastWe can't deny the phenomen of facebook but this film is about a bunch of obnoxious Young men fighting for money . It is David finchers least stylish and engaging film so far. No character study / depth or philesophical approach. All we can see a boring , overrated , dull " show me the money , baby" movie Expand

See all 348 User Reviews

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