Amazon.com's Scores

  • Music
For 468 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Chutes Too Narrow
Lowest review score: 30 Siberia
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 468
468 music reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it may be impossible for this Son Volt to ever reach the pinnacle of their 1995 debut, no one can accuse Jay Farrar of going through the motions.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I Can’t Stop blows away the dust and finds more life and gutbucket flash in a seemingly inexhaustible vein.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Strange, alluring, and disarming.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Features the kind of envelope-pushing fans have come to expect.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sprawling, funny, angry, compelling, and entirely unafraid.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sure, Get Rich could never have lived up to the hype, it’s nowhere near Biggie's Ready to Die or Nas's Illmatic, but there's no fast-forward material here, a near miracle in these times.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s hard to remember that he once wrote well-crafted ballads of romantic infatuation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Eleventh Hour, his largely self-produced fifth solo album--and first in eight years--lacks much of both the lyrical and instrumental verve of his best records.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On this album, GB make the Dead Kennedys seem subtle. And it would be nice if there were more variety to their sound.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a whole, the album stands as a benediction to an artist whose integrity and success has prevailed in the face of endless trends and fads that have swept away many lesser talents.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With her expressively breathy vocals and uplifting melodies, Mindy Smith expresses both the romantic and spiritual dimensions of rapture.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Songs About Girls is, for sure, a big, noisy record. But in addition to the kind of hugeness, it's sometimes hard to get your head around.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On first listen, Taking the Long Way seems too somber--in need of a bit of levity and more than a couple of uptempo songs (like the sexy, '60s-flavored "I Like It") to resonate for the long haul. It also seems to lack the writing quality that Darrell Scott, Patty Griffin, and Bruce Robison brought to Home. But on repeated plays, those concerns dissipate.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The real discovery is that he's capable of making the same old racket at just a fraction of the volume.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If the tasteful, lissome country-folk backing of steel guitar, fiddle, piano, drums, and harmony vocals from Cindy Wasserman is a tad shy of adventurous, the sound suits the ripe, romantic, and dreamy mood of Phillips's songs.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    True, LCD's music is not for everyone, which may have something to do with why their fans love them as they do. If you fall into the latter category, however, Silver is gold.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Worthy of more than novelty status.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pernice's unblemished voice is the key instrument.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Flitting between fraught ballads and up-tempo adult pop (the misguided sample-laden singles "Freeek!" and "Shoot the Dog" being the unnecessary exceptions), George here returns to the structure and mood of 1990s Listen Without Prejudice, Vol. 1. [Amazon UK]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Another set of sad but very fun songs.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A tight disc that skitters from track to shiny track with imagination and a renewed sense of rap's widened boundaries.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For a group with one of the most unmemorable band names ever, it's funny that it's their way with words that elevates them from wannabe status.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hell Hath No Fury isn't as well-assembled as Lord Willin' or as spontaneous as Clipse's lauded mix-CDs from 2005 but it is coldly efficient in knocking out 12 songs backed with superbly dark and sparse tracks by the Neptunes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A little more subdued than the songs on its firecracker debut, Make Out?, yes, but hardly lacking brains or bite.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    No, it does not rank with the band's best work. But yes, as long as Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey walk the earth in tandem, the Who live on.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Far be it for the imaginative contrarian to retrace Dylan's steps, and sure enough--despite an omnipresent harmonica--Ferry does just the opposite.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Some of their best work in nearly two decades.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all of the music's surface catchiness, the writing is some of Moorer's deepest to date.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The limitations of Lanois’s vocals lend an engaging frailty, leavened with bleak, lonely, instrumental interludes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Free to Stay is loaded with complex harmonies and awesome distorted keyboard sounds (hey, this is what Quasi were supposed to sound like!).