Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 1,680 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 To Pimp A Butterfly
Lowest review score: 20 Luminous
Score distribution:
1680 music reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's one of those albums that's good, but you also know you won't listen to it all that much.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Promise never runs out of steam or succumbs to laziness, but it's never as engaging as it should be, either.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Evil Heat... feels suspiciously like XTRMNTR outtakes, which isn't half as bad as it sounds; there's a sense of cohesion to the proceedings, and nothing, wisely, sounds remotely like the gossamer bliss-takes of Screamadelica.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At times too synth-heavy for their own good and at other times downright bizarre, Simian nonetheless appears to be following a forest path no one else seems to be treading.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Happy Songs for Happy People offers many of the thrills of Rock Action, but without the diversity and succinctness that made that album shine.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Trampin' is much too formulaic, too willing to leave the power of Smith's songwriting in words and not back it up musically.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    By the time Love & Distortion arrives at "The Simple Things Are Taking Over" and "Kleptophilia," the band finally has an identity of its own: smart without being pedantic, coy, but not pretentious, the British affectation in the vocals sounding more natural, the melodies spelled out with greater precision.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The strength of Comfort Woman's first half quickly diminishes as the ideas run dry.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A juvenile cluster bomb of goofy guitar shenanigans.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The band's dynamics are beyond reproach, and the album sounds fabulous. Problem: The quiet songs don't provide a proper outlet for the band's palpable tension, and Aereogramme stays quiet far too often.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Make no mistake: Kweller's an endearing artist, not to mention a talented lyricist, but it appears that he's simply too impressionable and ends up mirroring his influences rather than building upon them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Doesn't possess the necessary tension of DCD's best or her wonderful 1995 solo debut, The Mirror Pool.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The worst mistake you can make is to write off this band as just another sappy, sentimental Brit-pop effort, because you'd miss out on supreme moments of emotional clarity that far outweigh the muddier, more overwrought mistakes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, for every song that pulls at the heartstrings or prompts a minor political epiphany, Earle has included muddled-headed efforts that don't pass muster.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nothing comes close to the [early tracks], though plenty of interesting bits are strewn about.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The new songs have attitude, but they sound like outtakes from 2000's classic Kid A and 2001's lesser Amnesiac.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The listener's attention drifts as Harcourt dips into sleepy introspection, although his voice is so arresting that one won't wander for long.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Suggests that he's finally coming into his own, albeit gradually and grudgingly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The swapping out of Justin Harwood for Britta Phillips on bass seems to have enlivened things somewhat, but what starts so promising, sputters as the album progresses.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the rest of Dangerously in Love is only intermittently sexy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    You can imagine a modern-day Syd Barrett coming up with similar ideas after being locked in a closet with a laptop.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If it doesn't exactly blaze off in bold new directions, it does offer an opportunity for Interpol to do some fine-tuning (not that they need much) and settle comfortably into their black, velvet-lined pocket.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This album is so lightweight and airy, it often consigns itself to the background.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Melodically, Young creates a comfortable, atmospheric lilt his admirers will instantly recognize. Lyrically, however, Young's lost his way.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While the lack of onstage banter is welcome, Alive & Wired would have benefited from fewer songs and more space.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sennett's lilting accusations resemble buddy Conor Oberst minus the anti-Bush venom, but the homogeneous honesty, resplendent on "Not Going Home," ultimately grows tedious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nothing here to best the hungry creativity of Aenema's "Eulogy" or Lateralus' "The Grudge," which is particularly frustrating given that drummer Danny Carey dazzles again.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Living With War: American Idiot for hippies.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What the Soft Skeleton lacks is that sassy power Haines embodies with Metric.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A cursory listen is stultifyingly dull and alarmingly same-y, a pale follow-up to 2004's One Plus One Is One. A more careful ear reveals the sort of complexity we've come to expect from our Boy over the years.