Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 4,895 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 City of God
Lowest review score: 0 Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties
Score distribution:
4,895 movie reviews
  1. As forgettable as a puff off a generic-brand butt: filtered, flavored, and ultimately unsatisfying.
  2. Fails because it takes itself so seriously, and because it is itself so seriously dull. Soderbergh's straining to give us a wink -- come on, guys, this is fun -- but really it just feels like some awful eye twitch -- a spasm of yawning self-indulgence in a mostly captivating career.
  3. Breaks down before it gets out of the driveway.
  4. Hardly lives up to its name -- bedeviled is more like it.
  5. Lacks the bite that can equal the Bruckheimer bark.
  6. Feels more like Barry Levinson's "Tin Men" on Prozac.
  7. The Art of War must ultimately be chalked up as a strategic defeat.
  8. The most lackadaisical thriller I've ever seen, overly infatuated with not only the inexplicability of random evil, but also its mundanity.
  9. The script by S.S. Wilson and Brent Maddock (Ghost Dad) is so jumbled and the direction so chaotic that it's often hard to tell what's going on -- where, when, and why.
  10. A frenetic affair, busy and silly enough to make family froth like "The Princess Diaries" look like Grand Illusion.
  11. It's not wrong to wish these actors were working in the service of a better script or more assured direction, but it's probably also possible to simply take pleasure in their performances.
  12. The comedy is often harsh and cruel.
  13. Apart from the fang-restraint of the nosferatu, however, there's precious little that's altogether new or for that matter shocking about this by-the-numbers thriller.
  14. Remains little more than a briefly fascinating curiosity, a travelogue for those of us who can't actually attend.
  15. Spotlessly dull.
  16. Christian filmmaking has entered a new phase in which its creators have discovered how to soft-pedal their message under wraps of a conventional story.
  17. Just watching the trailer for Oliver Stone's new football epic a few weeks back left me with a grating headache; watching the whole sweaty film practically put me in the ICU.
  18. Selick is widely and rightly regarded as a master of surreal, dark humor, and wildly inventive animation technique, and Monkeybone is the first tarnish on his otherwise spotless reputation.
  19. Another frivolous product of whiny male anxiety that's as funny as a sitcom but longer and more expensive.
  20. Sporadically funny, the film seems weighted down, literally, with bulging, bulbous Murphys flatulating endlessly.
  21. Most of the actors seem to have been issued one facial expression at the beginning of the film, along with pain-of-death instructions not to change it under any circumstance.
  22. The finished product is as predictably dull as a newborn's soft spot.
  23. A character-driven piece with a character who seems somewhat hollow.
  24. There's not much spunk here.
  25. Not even the rich and nuanced performances of stage veterans Smith, Gambon, and Birkin can save this British period drama from languishing amid the story's unfocused longings and unrealistic musings.
  26. A limp and lackluster affair that telegraphs its feel-good smarm miles in advance.
  27. Predictable piffle, a comically unbelievable story that leaves almost no impression except what a sham our legal system is.
  28. Sex may, indeed, be all in the mind, but Romance fails to score in the mind's eye.
  29. It's the type of film that begs to be called “charming” and by doing so instead ends up grating.
  30. Nothing more than an extended version of the syndicated television program, with the unkempt Irwin spending most of the movie excitedly shouting at the camera as he taunts something venomous.

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