BBC collective's Scores

  • Music
For 150 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 From Here We Go Sublime
Lowest review score: 40 Yours Truly, Angry Mob
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 150
150 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga sees Britt Daniels channelling his persecution complex into more piano-driven 60s pop songs, screaming "Don't make me a target!" at the heavens as his girlfriend walks out. His band prove surprisingly versatile.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s an evanescent experience, for whilst you’re awestruck by the sonics beneath the electronic sheen, you can’t remember anything much about them after they’ve evaporated at the end.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If there is such a thing as music with a hairy chest, this is it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a real richness here, and raw venom beneath any fey first impressions, as gentle finger-picking bursts into free-jazz fuzztone guitar blasts and bloodied lyrics.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    NYPC's restrained disco needs to rip it up and get wilder, cos this down‘n’dirty posse is actually cleaner than a Boots cosmetics counter.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a fun mess, and although heavily indebted to 60s psyche folk and acid rock, Astronomy For Dogs has a verve and colour that saves it from derivative pastiche.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, The Sun feels like three men taking things at their own leisurely pace but without wasting a second.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For what both of Guillermo Scott Herren's alter-egos are concerned with is sound's texture rather than its structure, rendered here through the soft caressing of acoustic instruments instead of circuit board torture.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their debut has a great deal of shadowy appeal: there are lyrics about ghosts and secrets, set to drowsy washes of guitar.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever the permutations, Amiina's fragile magic can't fail to beguile.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s not just the recurrent meditations on mortality that makes Ma Fleur even more heart-rendingly beautiful than 2002’s Everyday, it’s also how The Cinematic Orchestra’s new album actually feels.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Excellent Italian Greyhound is vintage Shellac: stark, razorous and blackly comic, lurching into whatever time signature happens to possess drummer Tod Trainer.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While their sound might have progressed in an even more bizarre – if sadly less atmospheric – direction, it's still surprising, full of invention and totally unique.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As fun and full-on as it gets right now.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He’s an acquired taste, perhaps, but a distinctive and extraordinarily talented songwriter.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The influences may be antediluvian but the spirit is timeless.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As exciting as it is original-sounding.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is less cohesive than Vespertine or Medulla but the fun’s in the exuberance, the jolting between musical styles.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Having eschewed the over-earnest knob-twiddling of erstwhile producer Steve Albini, Verity Susman’s vocals and Mia Clarke’s guitars now sound crisp and urgent, and when the envelope gets pushed... the band’s detached cool melts into a pleasing joi de vivre.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite flashes of unexpected vigour, Everybody is ultimately more variation-on-a-theme than it is wheel reinvention.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Coming in 2007 it sounds oddly fresh, but nothing here’s as full-on as their early stuff or as lovely as Feel The Pain.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Even the most melancholy moments... have airy jazz arrangements that let them breathe.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Turner’s sharp narrative ear is still tuned to the revealing banalities of everyday life, the whole band admirably responsive to emotional nuance.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    More incoherent than Dntel’s superb debut Life Is Full Of Possibilities.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is not a bunch of old blokes looking to recapture their youth; rather, Grinderman sounds like a freshly hewn and rudely vigorous chunk of leftfield rock.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    What seemed fresh and charming on 2005's Noah's Ark sounds like an interminable racket this time round.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The lyrics are often sublime, of course, but there are big, stupid choruses too.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s gold here but you need to dig deep.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is one of those rare albums that makes you wonder how you ever got by without it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Klaxons serve up Day-Glo pagan ritual and pop silliness on toast, and kids get sick on it.