Blurt Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 980 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Southeastern
Lowest review score: 20 That's Why God Made the Radio
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 3 out of 980
980 music reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all the new sonic waves undulating through this record, however, the band's distinctive identity still shines--there's no mistaking Marble Son for the work of anyone else, and it's the ability to evolve while still remaining true to core values that makes Jesse Sykes & the Sweet Hereafter great.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Rip Tide is moderate in ambition, and hardly a masterwork, if such things empirically exist.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These Merritt wonder-tonics may not curl your hair or cure any ailment, but they act as a salve to a multitude of human conditions. Best to stock up and be prepared.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A tripped-out masterpiece of transcendental space fuzz that pays tribute to the ruins of Italy that goes beyond the headiest moments of Pink Floyd's legendary performance inside of that coliseum in Pompeii.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This artistic upgrade from their previous work is further enhanced by a significant expansion of their sonic arsenal, including piano, cello, Mellotron and female backing vocals courtesy of Crystal Stilts/Dum Dum Girls/Vivian Girls drummer Frankie Rose.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a talented quartet of musicians in tow--Thompson, Shawn Camp, Bryn Davies and Kenny Malone--the acoustic setting provides newcomers with an ideal introduction and gives longtime fans further reason for ongoing appreciation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the kick of recognition of the distinctive styles and contributions of each member is part of the pleasure, the album sounds like the product of a group, of a powerful force of equals. And it's all the better for it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Campbell is at the top of his game even at closing time. If there's no more to come then this is as good a spot as any to ring down the curtain.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If this all sounds sort of strange or back-handed, that can be attributed to the fact that Strange Mercy takes a few listens to grasp, and it makes the repeat visits enticing. And that's a sign of a strong album.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Optimism hasn't always been a hallmark of Doe's endeavors, but it ought to be said that this less-dour Doe is easy to enjoy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Without sounding anything like Pet Sounds, Seeds We Sow indicates Buckingham has absorbed Wilson's lessons well.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Father, Son, Holy Ghost contains some of the deftest songwriting of 2011, and is more than a worthy successor to the group's debut.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dreams Come True will certainly appeal to anyone who enjoys their new wave artful and avant-garde, both of which are delivered in spades across this exceptional LP that will surely be lost on many Grizzly Bear fans looking for an extension of their sonic safety net.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After 14 years they show no signs of slowing down and you know what you don't want them too because they haven't even come close to sucking. It's a win win for all of us.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By focusing more on originality and the aural progression of this album, Neon Indian is clearly honing their craft and proving that the musical trend they helped to create, won't be going out of style anytime soon.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Robert Earl Keen is a master storyteller who blends acoustic, nylon and steel guitar with solid percussion and his pure, distinct voice into the finest Americana has to offer.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The last song, a sparse electric guitar ballad, identifies another dualism: it's called "Get It Wrong, Get It Right," and like most of the rest of this unsettled album, it gets it right.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are 13 terrific cuts out of 15, and the album does it's job of demonstrating that the 5 Royales deserve reconsideration.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bennett harbors a magic about him that inspires you to become caught up in the beauty of his performance prowess regardless of what artist is playing second banana to him on the microphone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yet aside from that one cut, Megafaun's self-titled album seamlessly integrates an easy-going tuneful-ness with a nearly mystical devotion to tone and texture.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Devil's Walks minimal electronic landscape is mesmerizing and perfect for a quiet, rainy day of contemplation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The trademark ingredients that turned Hollywood Town Hall and Tomorrow the Green Grass into seminal classics are retained via Olson's yearning vocals, the sun splashed harmonies and their adept meld of Americana, vintage West Coast rock, strings and psychedelia.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seasons on Earth is like a wry, forgiving smile set to music, its pleasures veined with melancholy, its ruefulness buoyed by hope.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's Apocalypse a-go-go for the Georgia gentlemen. Go with them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I Wake Up Screaming is an absolute delight, a rhythmically exhilarating, lyrically humorous, melodically intoxicating collection of thirteen terrific songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The operatics of her voice make it the most intriguing instrument on the album but the new exploration of violins and cellos that feminize the massive drum fills make Conatus even more astounding.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While obviously studying their heroes with a fine tooth comb, Big Troubles has done a perfect job of combining past and present guitar pop into one 30 minute stew.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In crafting an album that’s filled with largess, they give their fans a work that genuinely seems destined for the ages.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wolfroy Goes to Town haunts you quietly, in a private way that is, somehow, all the more devastating.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Biophilia is a delicate and highly tactile treat, a unique gem of innovation (pipe organs driven by computers, the mallet-tickled gameleste) and gentle real soul whose breathy endearing heights Bjork hasn't touched in a minute.