Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,403 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
5,403 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ted
    A crass, foul-mouthed, mostly hilarious, surprisingly sentimental bromance.
  1. Thompson adapted the screenplay from Christianna Brand's "Nurse Matilda" books, and she and director Kirk Jones balance the slapstick and levity with darker enchantments. At its most enjoyable the film feels like Roald Dahl's idea of "Mary Poppins."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This crudely powerful film is a throwback. Unfolding at an elliptical pace that feels like a revelation, or tedium, or both, Japon recalls the glory days of 1970s art-house filmmaking.
  2. Zoo
    Devor's sympathy for both the men and the animals is humane, yet his movie is palpably sad. A sense of shame cuts through all the ambiguity. You know less about what you've watched when Zoo is over than you did when it started. And that's what makes the movie so hard to shake.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Shot with intentionally banal anti-style - minimal soundtrack music, found sound, jitter-cam - the movie achieves a wisdom that's bigger than it seems.
  3. The most interesting part of this lively, likable documentary is the journey.
  4. Plays like a college version of ''When Harry Met Sally.''
    • Boston Globe
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Short, suspenseful, funny, and profane, the film's a throwback to the neat little B-level thrillers the entertainment industry used to crank out by the dozen in the post- World War II era and the early days of TV.
  5. Part Marxist social drama and part Michael Moore corporation-needling, with fed-up residents trying to outsmart the big, bad naive company to keep their lights on for free.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The performances are what put it over -- that and the observant camera of director Udayan Prasad.
  6. As each scientist chronicles his or her story, one is impressed by the place that unswerving motivation and determination has assumed in the work.
    • Boston Globe
  7. The film is quick, painless, and more than a little brave: not since John Travolta, Jamie Lee Curtis, and the aerobicizers in "Perfect" has so much Lycra been so abused for our pleasure.
  8. With "Dogtooth," the point was: Don't try this at home. Now, the expanded lesson is: Don't try this anywhere.
  9. Like the great Iranian filmmakers, Rasoulof has no use for the artificiality of heightened drama.
  10. This is the first, smallest, and most essential planet in the Van Sant solar system. The seediness of "Drugstore Cowboy " started here. So did the one-way crushes in "My Own Private Idaho " and the gorgeously epic longueurs of "Last Days. "
    • 32 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A clever satire that's layered like a breakfast club sandwich with sly in-jokes, sight gags, gross-out scenes, and, of course, requisite bathroom humor.
    • Boston Globe
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The joy is in the details, and they are unrelentingly comic.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Doesn't try to be anything it's not. It's happy being a funny, shoot-'em-up, run-for-your-life, green-guts monster movie. And as green-guts monster movies go, it's a beaut.
  11. The movie, though, is nonsense. At its most credible, the story evokes fond memories of the adult drug narcs hiding among American high schoolers on ''21 Jump Street."
  12. As art, the movie is neither shallow nor profound, just inconsequential. Yet Coppola is too clever a filmmaker to dismiss the movie out of hand. If her film is mostly surface then she skims with style.
  13. Clearly, there's a story here. The documentary The Other Dream Team tells it in a smart, lively, if somewhat hectic fashion.
  14. A rousing movie that’s satisfyingly infused with traditional Disney sentiment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie lands like a punch.
  15. There’s no reason a conspiracy this outlandish should work twice. But it’s so hilariously within the realm of plausibility that it does.
  16. Enough originality and emotional weight to keep you engrossed even when it lapses into some pretty standard moves at the end.
    • Boston Globe
  17. One of the most warmly beguiling romantic comedies the Southern Hemisphere has sent our way in ages.
  18. A lovely , old-fashioned farm romance quietly doubling as a comment on immigration and American identity.
  19. I don't think I've seen an actor do more with deadpan expressions than Mara does in this movie. Her face doesn't move but, whether she's tasing a man or standing in front of a mirror watching a cigarette dangle from her mouth, we respond to her.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's cheap, it's clever - it's even a little scary in places.
  20. The film itself is also a beautiful work of art, exquisitely framed and precisely envisioned.
  21. Rothemund gives us his sophisticated filmmaking only in the finale, which is devastating in its briskness and fury.
  22. Zahedi's search for fulfillment is depleting, like throwing good sex after bad. The more we learn about the hole in his soul, the more vivid his misogamy becomes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Longley takes us through that country without a map; he's an artful, optimistic empiricist who believes what we see matters infinitely more than what we're told.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This charming, bittersweet 90-minute monologue consists of the actor telling tales of his childhood and early years, when he was an ugly duckling from an uglier family. The anecdotes are bruisingly funny and delivered with clarity and light mockery.
  23. A zestful genre outing, and then some, right up its final overkill.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A small film, but its ease and grace are virtues that can't be overrated.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    For someone wanting to get noticed as a filmmaker, George Lucas couldn't have done much better than THX 1138, his 1971 feature debut that starts a limited run today in a new director's cut.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As luscious as the filmmaking craft here is, it lacks the rude vitality, the unpredictability, the pure American craziness of the films that should have won him (Scorsese) the Oscar: "Mean Streets," "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull," and "GoodFellas."
  24. A little Hitchcock and some good Psycho fun at the beach.
  25. The filmmaker doesn't exactly let anyone off the hook.
  26. Although there's a certain connect-the-dots quality to the storytelling, there's no denying the care and craftsmanship that Gardos has brought to her debut film.
    • Boston Globe
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The director gives us a small, sincere and nearly perfectly realized film about adolescence in Oklahoma, aptly entitled The Outsiders. [24 Mar 1983]
    • Boston Globe
  27. There's something touching about the way Goldfinger obeys his moral compass. He doesn't seem at all happy with that luxury. It's a burden by a more extravagant name.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What makes Cheri’ worth your while is that its true subjects are women and age, and its observations apply to both 19th-century France and the modern film industry.
  28. It isn't afraid to genuflect to heroes and heroism and has everything it needs to connect with the resurgence of patriotism after Sept. 11.
    • Boston Globe
  29. The sweetly enticing Smiling Fish and Goat on Fire repays the bit of patience it asks.
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A Matter of Taste, French director Bernard Rapp's polished second film, swims in lies, ones that sate at first, but soon intoxicate, seduce, and drown.
    • Boston Globe
  30. This Earth doesn't really have anything new to say, but it does present some newly entertaining ways of saying it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film bears a resemblance to such multicharacter dramas as Robert Altman's ''Short Cuts" and Paul Thomas Anderson's ''Magnolia" -- like them, it's a portrait of a society straining at the seams -- but it manages the neat trick of being both charming and bilious.
  31. Jackman spends enough time compellingly playing stranger in a strange land that you’ll put up with a few unwanted doses of the old familiar.
  32. The film would be just as powerful, if less likely to saturate suburban megaplexes and flatter its patrons, were its saviors -- I don't know - French.
  33. At its best, Up in the Air invents new realms for old Hollywood sophistication.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Stunning performances help make The Sleepy Time Gal a thoughtful, moving piece that faces difficult issues with honesty and beauty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching these pint-size Astaires and Rogerses practice the fox trot, tango, rumba, and swing is the immediate hook to Mad Hot Ballroom.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Giuliani Time has an ax to grind and wields it with dull-edged force.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Alan Pakula's literal adaptation of William Styron's Sophie's Choice is an admirable, if reverential, movie that crams this triangle into a 2 1/2 -hour character study enriched by Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline, and nearly destroyed by Peter MacNicol. [21 Jan 1983]
    • Boston Globe
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So few Hollywood movies go here that this one's oddly welcome, even in its most turgid moments, of which there are many.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A chick flick of a particularly intelligent, ruthless, and loving sort.
  34. At some point we're flashed a junkyard billboard telling us that Collinwood is the ''Beirut of Cleveland'' - yes, but here, it's by way of Looney Tunes.
  35. Structural shortcomings and all -- gives a neglected giant of African independence his due.
    • Boston Globe
  36. Puts the fun back into going to Arnold Schwarzenegger movies. He said he'd be back, and he is.
    • Boston Globe
  37. [Verhoeven's] cold, slick, funny, high-powered movie is informed by a humanism this genre almost always abandons in its chase after vigilante splat. [17 Jul 1987]
    • Boston Globe
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You probably won't see a better directorial debut this year than David Michôd's Animal Kingdom.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A broader work than Baumbach's last movie, and it's funnier, too, even as you gasp at the misbehavior.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Orphanage gets by on mood and a mournfulness that's not easily soothed. Sadness and loss, it says, are the threads connecting the spirit world and our own, and women, who bring life into the world, understand that far better than men ever will.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    More than a predictable self-discovery yarn about the caterpillar that turns into a beautiful butterfly.
  38. The Eamery, as some called it, was highly successful as a business - and, more important, as an exercise in tastemaking. "We wanted to make the best for the most for the least,'' the Eameses like to say.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Against the odds, John Carter is itself pretty amazing - an epic pulp saga that slowly rises to the level of its best imitations and wins you over by degrees.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s rooted in observed reality and idiosyncratic individuals. It’s possible, Silva is saying, to live among people and still be terribly, crushingly isolated.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In its exuberantly smutty way, The To Do List is a revolutionary development: a teen sex comedy where the girls get to play nasty and the boys stand around looking vaguely terrified.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like its hero, the movie doesn't flinch for most of its running time.
  39. A luminous love letter to the Banco Chinchorro, the largest coral reef off Mexico's coast, and to the tender bonds between a father and son.
  40. Suggests a summit meeting between ''The Princess Bride'' and ''Bridget Jones's Diary,'' it has a decided charm of its own.
    • Boston Globe
  41. Even at the movie's most ridiculous (and Mongol is not without its ridiculous moments), this is a picture you laugh with more than laugh at.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Any movie that shows its heroes firing up a joint between stints as high-school anti-drug crusaders is true to its black little heart.
  42. It makes a sane, civil, humanist case for marriage for all.
  43. You aren't likely to see a more ludicrous movie for the rest of the year. But rarely has such ludicrousness been used to pay tribute to a town in need of love. Déjà Vu is generic enough to have been filmed anywhere. But it happens to be set in post-Katrina New Orleans.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's an "Annie Hall" for the iPod generation: über-designed, pleasing to the touch, making up in generic sweetness what it lacks in bite.
  44. Bridesmaids openly, comfortably turns the stress of being girlfriends into comedy. It's really about the single friend backing away from the edge of temporary insanity. This isn't the greatest such movie. That would be Nicole Holofcener's "Walking and Talking" (1996), with Catherine Keener and Anne Heche.
  45. This is the first movie to make me equate coming home from prison with coming home from war.
  46. Titanic is a big-budget spectacle and director Cameron brings it off with high-tech bravura, placing us aboard the ship in real time.
  47. What Grind lacks in cinematic skill, it makes up for in heart, which is what most dudes-in-arms flicks are missing. Given the option of spending eternity with these gentlemen or the boys of ''American Pie,'' I'd choose the lads of Grind.
  48. Despite its contradictions, the film stayed with me after I left the theater. It's frivolous. But it's also powerfully surreal.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A multi-character melodrama about the supernatural that's affecting both in spite of and because of its flaws.
  49. Daybreakers has unexpected flashes of brilliance.
  50. It's the videotaped equivalent of a primary research data dump. But to quote Bette Davis by way of Edward Albee: What a dump.
  51. Eastwood risks embarrassment flirting with material this naked in its mawkishness, then jumps right in. He seems to want the world to know: Inside the 72-year-old body of this icon of virility beats the heart of a Mexican woman.
  52. Short without feeling scant. That's how big its sense of grief is.
  53. Rapt is smooth, cool, and efficient. It's a movie with very little wasted motion - or, for much of its length, wasted emotion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The most consistently funny of the ''Austin Powers'' films.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Into the Woods is forced in some places but exquisitely right in others, and it gains strength as it goes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Once the cat is out of the bag, "Incident" becomes simultaneously entertaining and disappointing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Jensen's charming film, is perhaps one of the first in which the actors are credited not by the size of their salaries and egos, but by their vocal ranges.
    • Boston Globe
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Dreamers isn't that bad -- actually, it's funny, affecting, interestingly twisted, and seriously erotic before it heads south in the final stretch.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Jasmine is a creation to stand with this filmmaker’s best, but Blanchett makes it better. She finds the grace notes in a disgraceful woman and leaves us stranded between horror and pity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's a potboiler but a gripping one, and it leaves you chewing on both its nuances and implausibilities.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The whole thing's weightless: An upscale date-movie bonbon that keeps yielding pungent aftertastes.
  54. Nearly all the interviews are with the professionals. That's fine, since these guys are almost as good at talking as they are at smiling.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It has its own bizarre charms and a breezy confidence that renders it the very definition of a simple pleasure.
  55. It is Close's performance that gives the movie its oomph and will leave adults with smiles as wide as the kids'.
    • Boston Globe

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