Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,352 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 I'm the One That I Want
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
5,352 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If the first two films belong with the greatest (if talkiest) movie romances of all time, the new film is richer, riskier, and more bleakly perceptive about what it takes for love to endure (or not) over the long haul.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In his masterful and haunting documentary Up the Yangtze, Yung Chang shows the old China drowning helplessly under the weight of the new.
  1. Nothing momentous happens here, but Philibert has a magical sense of how to find the simple poetry lurking in the universal routine of being a kid. A lot of the film's lyricism is extracurricular.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So clear-eyed and three-dimensional that it makes the recent ''Pearl Harbor'' look like a bunch of kids playing dress up. Aspects of the film have dated, but in the important things it's more mature than anything proposed lately by modern Hollywood.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You may even feel like dancing in the aisles yourself. Sure, the real world doesn't always work this way. Have you forgotten that this is one of the reasons why we go to movies in the first place?
  2. Ten
    The new Abbas Kiarostami film is called Ten, and in it something amazing happens: nothing.
  3. Satisfying in every respect, it's a piece of blue-collar chamber music, never treating the characters cheaply, allowing them a complex entwinement of emotions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Wrestler is a character study, no more and no less, yet it's open-ended enough to function as many things.
  4. Deeper and richer in humanity than all but a handful of the American films released this year.
  5. This is a trenchant emotional thriller that you watch in dread, awe, and amazing aggravation. It's entirely predicated upon the outcome of bad decisions - and it is not a comedy. The situation that unfolds approaches the absurdity of farce but denies the relief and release of humor. It's a tragic farce. No option or choice is to be envied.
  6. The usual emphasis in a detective film is upended so that procedure, thrillingly, is more important than action. In its own way, this is one of the most intense cop movies you'll see.
  7. Its breadth, profundity, and stunningly rendered vision make idealism seem renewed and breathtaking again.
  8. Beautifully crafted and brutally honest.
  9. The surehandedly wrought, beautifully acted, almost unbearably tense In the Bedroom is a rare film, not to be missed.
    • Boston Globe
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    For some of us, this constitutes a religious event.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Days of Being Wild shows Wong discovering his own cinematic language, and he's as astonished as we are.
  10. The Act of Killing is one of the most extraordinary films you’ll ever encounter, not to mention one of the craziest filmmaking concepts anywhere.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Compact, nasty, and altogether wonderful, a tale of brotherly greed and New York comeuppance that shows an old dog dusting off old tricks using new technology.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a performance (Giamatti's) so nuanced and so real in its everyday pain that it doesn't stand a chance of winning an Oscar. But it should.
  11. Hoop Dreams is without peer among sports-oriented documentaries to the extent that it's about people before it's about athletic feats. It respects its subjects' complexity and tenacity while nailing the problematic, double-edged influence of sports in America. In fact, no film has ever combined sports and family values as powerfully as Hoop Dreams. There's simply nothing like it. [21 Oct 1994, p.47]
    • Boston Globe
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Citzenfour is prosaic in its presentation and profoundly chilling in its details, and if you think Snowden is a traitor, you should probably see it. If you think he’s a hero, you should probably see it. If you haven’t made up your mind — well, you get the idea.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Is ''Dr. Strangelove" Kubrick's best movie? Along with ''Paths of Glory," absolutely.
  12. Freshly viewed, the movie's melancholy seems to fit uncannily well in the moment we find ourselves now. In the film there are mentions of nuclear annihilation and worries that heedless lust and wanton partying could bring Rome a second fall.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the most hopeful and heart-rending movies I've seen this year.
  13. Affecting, troubling, dazzling film.
  14. Through patience, skill, discretion, and trust, Jesse Moss has taken a seemingly small town story and turned it into both a microcosm of today’s most urgent issues and a portrait of a single suffering soul.
  15. This is the most significant feature about poor black life since Charles Burnett's 1977 "Killer of Sheep."
  16. Setting aside, just for a moment, his general loathsomeness, there is a case to be made for a less apparent aspect of Benito Mussolini: He was once really hot.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As its title implies, This Is England isn't a hyperstylized head-trip a la "Trainspotting" but a straightforward calling to account.
  17. This is the first beautiful performance in the year's first great movie.

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