Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,428 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Social Network
Lowest review score: 0 The Black Waters of Echo's Pond
Score distribution:
5,428 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This isn't a movie -- it's an author in love with the sound of her own voice.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    You’d think the 3-D effects would bring the action closer, but the kooky optics often have the opposite effect, turning the athletes into GI Joe and Boba Fett action figures zipping around a dollhouse set.
  1. The best thing about Saint John of Las Vegas is that it makes you really appreciate guys like David Lynch and Joel and Ethan Coen.
  2. A sequel that makes it clear that the outrageous antics of the first movie had a one-time-only charm.
  3. Somewhere in this movie, amid the ponderous exchanges and unfortunate O. Henry-style coincidences, there's American tragedy.
  4. As an up-to-the-minute representation of the specifics of the teen universe, Sleepover lacks authenticity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A stylish, watchable, very familiar future-cop action thriller. What was once original is now almost completely derivative.
  5. What follows is no “Citizen Kane,” or even “Velvet Goldmine” (1998), Todd Haynes’s arty tale of a reporter trying to track down a missing glam rock star, in which Collette also starred, playing the missing man’s alcoholic wife.
  6. It's not that What a Girl Wants is dreadful; it's merely slapdash, wildly inconsistent in tone and style, and mind-numbingly predictable in character and plot.
  7. The camerawork is steady, the editing patient, the choreography playful. It's a zippy and inspired piece of moviemaking. But there's one problem. It's playing under the closing credits.
  8. While the film grabs us on cue with its sudden strikes that end with blood dripping from the monster's dragon fangs as it zips back into the dark, it's also true that predictability robs the thrust and counterthrust of the purely visceral impact it once had. The monsters just aren't that scary anymore, and so the film mostly just sits there, gloomy and inert, sunk in exhausted myth, looking and sounding Wagnerian but feeling underpowered despite its diversionary moves. [22 May 1992, p.29]
    • Boston Globe
  9. The script is a little too clunky to serve Ricki Lake well, and Richard Benjamin's direction is a bit too sluggish to disguise her limited range as he crams this romantic fairy tale a little too forcefully into its predetermined mold. [19 Apr 1996, p.53]
    • Boston Globe
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Beautiful to look at and acted with full and tempestuous conviction, it still seems to be taking place in an apartment far across the way.
  10. The picture's structural intricacy is a smoke screen for its psychological and emotional shallowness.
  11. The explicit encounters and dirty talk in Eating Out suggest a new genre -- call it porncom -- that seeks to amuse and arouse at the same time.
  12. It's hard to find the movie unpleasant, but it's hard to imagine it causing any strong reaction at all.
    • Boston Globe
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As the romance blossoms, our hero is vindicated when Melody accepts his quirks, even enables his fantasy life. But the touches of magical realism begin to feel gimmicky. By the final frame, this romance never feels real enough.
  13. Premium Rush has a lot of energy - too much, it's kind of exhausting.
  14. In one amusing bit of dialogue, Stallone and Schwarze-negger kid each other about being smarter than they look. For a little while at least, we thought we might be able to say the same about Escape Plan.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ideally, it would give you a sense of an entire people knocking the planet off its axis with a shake of their hips. If only El Cantante were that movie. Instead, it's a curiously sludgy cross between a Doomed Star biopic and a J. Lo vanity project.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If Shutter is any indication, the reputation of professional photographers is still on the wane. Not only are photographs creepy, the film suggests, but so are photographers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Real satire must be savage, and Four Lions, for all its daring, finally doesn't dare enough.
  15. It's an unfocused overview that intersperses choppy interviews and observations with clips from "Deep Throat," including some of its most notorious and explicit scenes.
  16. Chasing Madoff is mostly that sort of movie, the kind you make when all you've seen is other movies and television shows about crime, when you want someone to know what you can do with a juicy story that takes some effort to ruin.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Fifth Estate is itself the response of an entrenched and corporatized information system toward something it barely comprehends. It makes a media format that has sustained us for decades — the two-hour movie — feel like a 20th-century dinosaur.
  17. Joffe's biggest mistake isn't visual, it's chronological. What makes Pinkie so terrifying in the novel is that he's just 17.
  18. The novel is extremely funny. It's hilarious as well as horrific (all sorts of bad things are going on outside the limo - and a few inside of it, too). Yet whenever the movie is funny, it feels like a mistake. Comedy has never been a Cronenberg strength.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Most useful and enlightening as a historical tour through the major crises of the Kennedy administration.
  19. Robot & Frank isn't sure whether it's a comedy or drama, buddy movie or sci-fi fantasy, family melodrama or social satire.
  20. To those filmgoers who wouldn't know Rat Fink from Barton Fink, this reviewer's advice is: Pass. The latest counterculture tribute by Mann, director of 1988's "Comic Book Confidential" and 1999's "Grass," is as proudly silly as it is informative, and it can't help that a critical amount of brand coolness gets lost in the translation.

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