Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,331 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 I'm the One That I Want
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
5,331 movie reviews
  1. Meretricious without being entertaining, it's an easy game -- and an easier film -- to sit out.
    • Boston Globe
  2. A fatally insubstantial film.
    • Boston Globe
  3. The repartee, as ever, is weak. Even with all the extra layers of digital detail, it’s still tough to keep these four straight. And the CG characters’ slimy rendering and motion-capture expressiveness could go down with “The Polar Express” as a study in inadvertent, technologically misguided screen creepiness. Wackier would have been OK, guys — it’s the Ninja Turtles.
  4. As tiresome as the relentless, indulgent inscrutability and lack of story momentum can be, it says something for the movie’s visceral power that there isn’t an urge to quit on it.
  5. The plot doesn’t take clever turns, the visual thrills aren’t all that thrilling, and you’re ultimately left to get your heist-movie kicks elsewhere.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A bumptious splatter farce that manages to improve from awful to moderately engaging as its cast is winnowed down to the five guys themselves.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The biggest unresolved question here is why we're paying $9.50, plus popcorn, for something we can presumably get at home for free.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's coherent, well shot, and tartly acted, but it wears you down like a dinner guest showing off his doctorate.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It might even work if In the Cut was remotely convincing as a thriller, but Campion can't help wrinkling her nose at genre.
  6. Crude, lewd comedy that makes ''Animal House'' seem wholesome.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ghost Rider is the kind of movie that's great stupid fun as long as someone else is buying the tickets.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Dazzling to behold yet puny of imagination, the movie takes the “Star Wars” formula — hero myths nicked from Joseph Campbell, cutting-edge visual effects, comic-strip dialogue, goofy-looking aliens — and reduces it to generic Big Box shelf product.
  7. It's hard to believe anyone would think importing a French comedy was a good idea.
    • Boston Globe
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All that’s missing is Clyde the orangutan from Clint Eastwood’s “Every Which Way But Loose,” which, trust me, this movie could have used.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Perhaps the biggest disappointment is that The In-Laws was directed by Andrew Fleming, who delivered the fizzy Nixon-era comedy ''Dick'' a few years back and who also had a hand in ''Grosse Pointe,'' the wicked, briefly-lived WB parody of TV teen dramas. The man obviously knows from satire, but not on the evidence of anything here.
  8. Flirt has its moments, and Ewell and Nikaidoh are auspicious additions to the Hartley rep company. But Flirt will appeal mostly to Hartley completists. [23 Aug 1996]
    • Boston Globe
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Occasionally veers so far into absurdity that it manages to make its central character - capable, smart, working mom Kate Reddy - look like a nitwit.
  9. It’s a Christmas nightmare, stuck with two obnoxious relatives who think they’re funny, and won’t shut up.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A textbook example of how a director can strip away plot, motivation, character, and meaning and still leave arrant pretension standing tall.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Works so hard to be inoffensive that you may well be offended.
  10. One hopes that, for their own good, when any of these actors are offered a script like this again, they’ll have the sense to just say no.
  11. A one-trick action thriller that feels like a poor cousin of an episode of ''24." Call it ''12."
  12. The fundamental value put forth in Brown’s “Sunday” sequel is not fearlessness but “family.”
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Almost but not quite as obnoxious as its title. Little kids will love it. You’ll need a hazmat suit.
  13. It seems endless. It's also unusually crude and stupid, even for an Arnold Schwarzenegger movie.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The bad news, for those looking forward to The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause with anything like enthusiasm, is this: Bernard the Elf is history.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    In this bilingual morality movie about love, family, and fate, however, the unpredictability turns out to be highly predictable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    21
    The movie's chief audience, consequently, will probably be gullible and young, responding to the cliches only because they haven't seen them before. They have a word in Vegas for these people: Suckers.
  14. Dukakis gets off some of the film's best lines and keeps the worst from sinking the whole affair; Polley's role is limited, but her character's audition for a feminine hygiene commercial is by far the best thing here.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    2 1/2 hours of tumescence disguised as a motion picture.

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