Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,401 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 I'm the One That I Want
Lowest review score: 0 Gigli
Score distribution:
5,401 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Battle of Algiers is a thinking person's action film in which there are winners -- but no heroes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the kind of film that reminds you of what movies, at their best, are capable of.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The impact of this stunning film - and the lessons to be learned from it - are as remarkable as when it was first released 30 years ago.
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The documentary any American with an opinion on our involvement in Iraq owes it to his or her conscience to see.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s about spycraft, but it goes to the source. If for no other reason, it deserves to be seen for arranging decades of events in the Middle East into a chronology that, to an outsider, makes dreadful sense.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    When all is said and done, Goodbye to Language may simply be about Jean-Luc Godard exploring 3-D filmmaking, in the same way “The Shining” is really just about Stanley Kubrick wanting to fart around with a Steadicam. Which, honestly, is fine. Great artists use new tools to discover new vehicles for seeing, understanding, living. Be thankful we get to come along for the ride.
  1. It isn't often that lives of quiet desperation are served up with such pearly restraint.
  2. The story is spun forth ravishingly, tenderly, and urgently, with a captivating mix of beauty, spare sophistication, and profound humanity.
  3. It's terse, atmospheric, fatalistic, with vertiginous camera angles and edits offsetting its gray documentary flatness.
  4. Both a staggering realist thriller and a jeremiad.
  5. "In Cold Blood," "Badlands," "The Executioner's Song," and now, joining those grisly milestones on the heartland hit list, and every bit their equal, is Boys Don't Cry.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the best, most karmically satisfying comedies of the year, much to the chagrin of the people who are in it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is pricelessly comic -- the Harvey/Joyce scenes catalog the couple's neuroses with glee -- but it just as often reaches for something richer.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The miracle is that 'The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers is better: tighter, smarter, funnier.
  6. A Bronx Tale is a joy, a film that comes unerringly from someone's heart and experience, and not from a power lunch of agents with clients to be packaged. [1 Oct 1993, p. 49]
    • Boston Globe
  7. The women here aren't afraid to get extreme about love, but in the end, you sense that they are too sound to destroy themselves over the worthless man they have allowed to personify it. That's what lifts Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown from the amusing to the sublime. [23 Dec 1988, p.23]
    • Boston Globe
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie captures that heady adolescent sense of time stopping and the moment mattering while standing far enough back to let us acknowledge all the pitfalls Marieme is moving too fast to see.
  8. Naked is one of the most scorchingly compelling films in years, Mike Leigh's masterpiece, an unflinching vision of civilization in retreat, life as apocalypse. [4 Mar. 1994, p.51]
    • Boston Globe
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The surface of Oslo, August 31st is as cool and crystalline as a Scandinavian lake, but at its core is a benevolence for the life we all share and tears for the man who can no longer share in it.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film that many consider the finest of its decade, Raging Bull, has aged well, and not just because it was filmed in black and white.
  9. A gorgeous autumnal period piece that catches a vanishing proprietary class on the eve of its extinction in Ireland in 1920.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Moves like hot mercury, and it draws a viewer so thoroughly into its world that real life can seem thick and dull when the lights come up.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Foreign intrigue is raised to an art form.
  10. Ferguson's film is a clear-sighted counterpoint to the former secretary of defense's impression. As the title suggests, it's a seemingly infinite mess.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Unfolds with the serenity of a fable but underneath it draws intelligent, deeply troubled connections between the personal, political, and spiritual.
  11. We're now far enough from that era that seeing it all again feels like a slap to the face in the same way that watching certain moments in the civil rights epic "Eyes on the Prize" chills your bones. This doesn't have that series' stately magnitude. It's smaller and crasser, but it's comparatively galvanic.
  12. Terrific French film about that most universal of subjects - work.
  13. A deep, exhaustive, and moving piece of do-it-yourself detective work.
  14. Slly, sublime, buoyant mischief that is virtually without parallel in 20th-century art, much less 20th-century film.
    • Boston Globe
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Tootsie, the story of a man who liberates himself by masquerading as a woman, is the funniest, most revealing comedy since "Annie Hall." [17 Dec 1982]
    • Boston Globe

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