Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,040 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear
Lowest review score: 0 The Skulls
Score distribution:
6040 movie reviews
  1. You can see her (Binoche) effect on Kiarostami's filmmaking: She brings out something new in him, too.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Baby Driver is the best time I’ve had at the movies in months, and, if the world is too much with you (as it is for many of us these days), you may feel the same. It’s a dazzling diversion, a series of cinematic highs that achieve the giddiness of not great art but great entertainment (and thus art through the back door).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is a slacker detective story, emphasis on the slack, and if you can downshift into its loping rhythms, it's pretty wonderful.
  2. "Grin Without a Cat" brilliantly used montage and a wide intellectual scope to speculate about the history of war and revolution. "Grinning Cat" is a more modest achievement, but the director's wisdom remains robust.
  3. I've never seen a movie so perfectly balanced between unabashed nerdiness and hipness.
  4. Grace is grace, and however it arrives, there's no denying its presence.
  5. Why do Parker and the other clinic owners and staff persevere despite constant harassment and potential assassination? Not for the money, certainly. Perhaps because no one else will.
  6. Henry David Thoreau plays an enigmatic role in Shane Carruth’s hypnotic thriller — an oxymoronic term to describe a film that is truly sui generis.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Remains worth seeing as an achingly nostalgic farewell to youthful idealism, tinged with a kind of loving contempt.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Moore's conception of the character is compelling. She rivets us. She's assisted by the superb performances Redford has elicited from her co- stars, Sutherland and Timothy Hutton, who plays Conrad, the guilt-ridden surviving brother of the dead boy. [26 Sep 1980]
    • Boston Globe
  7. Though some of the concepts may be New Age boilerplate, the film’s images linger; especially that of the river, the snake devouring us all.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie sprawls, almost entirely in a good sense, and it lets the audience draw its own conclusions. None of them is likely to be rosy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Whenever a band plays in “Persian Cats,’’ the director treats us to a fast, vibrant montage of Iranian faces and street scenes -- as if to say, look, this is who we REALLY are.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Brokeback may be too polished for some people, too elegantly dispassionate in its study of choked passion.
  8. Kusama’s handling of point of view is diabolically shrewd. She maximizes the terror potential of the vapidly ostentatious modernist mansion without fetishizing it. She intensifies the monstrosity of some of the characters by making them all too human. And as for guessing the ending — good luck.
  9. Just when you were about to give up on the Internet as a swamp full of trolls, bullies, and liars, along comes a documentary like Ido Haar’s Presenting Princess Shaw.
  10. With Jackson leading the way, Shaft has style, punch, and street cred. It's a hot cool update.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With a tranquil fearlessness, it goes beyond the death of memory, to see what might be found in the unexplored country beyond. The answer is both frightening and comforting: More love. Unspecified love. Universal love.
  11. When the effusive Pedro Almodóvar adapts the minimalist Alice Munro, he reveals the passions seething under the bleakness of the latter’s monotone mid-Canada. By setting his version of the Nobel Prize-winner’s interlinked stories “Chance,” “Soon,” and “Silence” in the vibrant settings of Madrid and other Spanish locales, he adds a Sirkian twist to Munro’s Chekhovian sensibility.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A history lesson for a country and a people forced to forget at gunpoint.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    On the whole it’s daring and committed, and in Röhrig’s tremendously focused performance, it honors all the saints we’ll never know. And that’s worth any risk.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If there's a larger theme in Zatoichi, it's that nobody is quite who he or she seems.
  12. It is part Rorschach test and part theme park ride as the filmmakers shoot from the strangest places and from such odd perspectives that much of the film consists of trying to figure out what the heck is going on.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's masterstroke is to avoid interviewing the usual anti-globalist suspects and let solid, hard-working middle Americans speak.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A film of great ingenuity and imagination, full of suggestive power, and it deserves to be seen.
  13. Warm, smart, and funny!
    • Boston Globe
  14. An upsetting landmark. Don't take the children.
    • Boston Globe
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You don’t get groundbreaking cinema from Fences, but what you do get — two titanic performances and an immeasurable American drama — makes up for that.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Queen of Versailles is still worthwhile, not because it questions all-American entitlement but because it prompts us to think hard about what, exactly, we believe we're entitled to.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An entertainment to be not just seen but absorbed on a molecular level; it's as close to a full-body experience as we'll get until they invent the holo-suits. Cameron aims for sheer wonderment, and he delivers.

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