Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,905 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Gomorrah
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5905 movie reviews
  1. It's the best drug-busting movie since ''The French Connection.''
  2. Like the children’s films of Iranian directors Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi, Bad Hair explores such social pathology, in part, in the guise of a kids’ movie. But it also takes on the intensity of more pointed films such as “Bicycle Thieves” (1948) and even Hector Babenco’s sensationalistic “Pixote” (1981).
  3. It sounds like the old unstoppable-force-meets-immovable-object trick. Ramin Bahrani's Goodbye Solo has the trappings of such a story, but, mercifully, none of the follow-through.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Think of it as "Glee" without music. Without a net, too.
  4. Huppert’s amazing performance not only masters the physical rigors and deformations of her character, but more importantly captures her cold capriciousness and the enigmatic innocence that one of Maud’s friend’s labels “perverse.”
  5. It is haunting in its literal and symbolic meanings, which is the powerful, lingering effect of Yellow Asphalt.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The great pleasure of le Carré-land — for some, it’s the frustration — is that one’s own moral certainties are quickly stood on their head.
  6. As often happens in Guzmán’s films, The Pearl Button keeps returning to the Augusto Pinochet dictatorship of 1973-90, during which thousands of Chileans were “disappeared,” taken away and never seen again alive.
  7. Funny, gritty, filled with surprising stabs of feeling, Parenthood is a stretch for Ron Howard, its director. This new adult comedy has the generosity of "Cocoon" and "Splash," but it takes Howard into deeper, darker, messier territory. [2 Aug 1989, p.57]
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The only question his movie doesn't ask is "What do you want your next car to run on?" That's up to you.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Essential viewing for anyone who wants to know the roots -- and perils -- of modern political dissent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A compelling and eerily effective little drama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Crazy Love doesn't downplay the awfulness of what happened , but it also knows a good media circus when it sees one.
  8. Fresh, original, and arresting.
    • Boston Globe
  9. Like its stunt work, the movie is both ridiculously hyperactive and a muscular feat of absolute confidence. I don't expect to have a more adrenalizing time at the movies this summer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Butler is a remarkable, even exhilarating movie not for its inherent Gump-itude but for the social portrait that gimmick allows.
  10. With its hypnotic performance by Rooker as Henry, it's most terrifying not in its carnage (although that's terrifying enough), but when it forces us to confront our own blinkered passage through the world, our blindness to the closeness of violent death. [5 Jan 1990, p.69]
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What Herzog almost accidentally captures in his viewfinder is profound and unsettling: an entire American underclass where at least some prison time is the norm and where only luck and the grace of God keep a person from either wrong end of the shotgun.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A cleareyed, disarmingly tender adolescent romance that bears comparison with the best of its genre.
  11. Director Penny Marshall's choreography encompasses emotional as well as physical ebbs and flows. Awakenings lives up to its title. [11 Jan 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  12. The achievement of this movie is that Kaurismäki manages the seemingly impossible task of making a farce about farces. In other words, this is a very good movie in quotation marks and a very good movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What's most unusual about the original 24 years later, though, is its elegant minimalism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A much better movie than the one it honors.
  13. Quite apart from wringing the last molecule of vividness from his freewheeling roster of loose cannons, he brings to his direction of Martin a finesse shared by only a few of the directors who have worked with the comedian-actor.
    • Boston Globe
  14. Gray's haunted, obsessional riffs are absorbing theater. Because Demme had the good sense to lay back and not beat them over the head with his cameras, they're equally compelling on film. [27 Mar 1987]
    • Boston Globe
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a deceptively impersonal style, because Beyond the Hills seethes with astonishment and rage at a broken society marooned between the 21st century and the 16th.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A broad, foursquare piece of populist filmmaking that happens to be tremendously moving.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Has the impact of a left-right combination to the chin.
  15. Alexandra is a pleasure to watch, but it's also one of those lovely, unclassifiable movies that flourishes better with repeated or prolonged exposures.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Black Book takes the conventions of the WWII epic -- the prison breaks, the interrogation scenes -- and undermines them with craft and muscle and the ripe lack of restraint we've come to expect from this director.

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