Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,456 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Poetry
Lowest review score: 0 Gigli
Score distribution:
5,456 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like the best spiritual movies, of whatever faith, "Of Gods and Men" moves us toward a union with the infinite, and when we come to the monks' last supper, the moment is staggeringly powerful.
  1. Some might find the dual conclusions too blunt in their irony, but “Norte” does not try to be consoling. Crazy as Fabian’s ideas seem, they might be the ones that prevail.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Should you see it? Of course you should. Anything Miyazaki does is worth your time. But the movie’s a gorgeous, problematic anomaly in an illustrious career.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The thread that winds through their stories is love lost and connections found, but only the audience is able to weave it into something to keep.
  2. Smart, unpredictable, and alive with the energies of actors who clearly are enjoying being stretched by their material.
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This may not be the greatest movie version of the novel, but it's possibly the truest.
  3. More conventional in approach than Linklater’s 12-year filmmaking odyssey, “Identity” demonstrates its boldness not with stylistic originality but with political acuity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is music to gorge on, raw ethnic survival in the form of sound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The deeper Tim’s Vermeer takes you, the peskier and more profound the questions get.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Ynever seen a documentary quite like this one, and aren't likely to again.
    • Boston Globe
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The script is biting and timely.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's an even four-hander, with awful behavior spread evenly among the characters and spellbinding performances by the quartet of co-leads.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Room 237 is like being stuck on an airplane next to a stranger hellbent on convincing you of his very detailed, very paranoid theory of the universe. Actually, it’s like being stuck on a plane full of those guys, each with a different yet compellingly insane take on reality. And the in-flight entertainment features only one movie: “The Shining.”
  4. In the absolutely moving new documentary Watermarks, seven women in their 80s return to the Vienna swimming pool of their youth.
  5. Anderson is the rare filmmaker who doesn't want to use the actress as an instrument or to exploit her independent-movie cachet. She has freed Moore to be what she hasn't been with many directors: credibly human.
  6. It takes a woman to make a great film about the all-male bastion of the French Foreign Legion. Claire Denis did so in her elliptical desert updating of Herman Melville’s “Billy Budd” in “Beau Travail” (1999), and her fellow French director Sarah Leonor nearly equals that feat in The Great Man.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    American Sniper may be the hardest, truest movie ever made about the experience of men in war. Why? Because there’s no glory in it.
  7. Melding history, science, and up-to-the-minute urgency, A Fierce Green Fire is a clarion call that’s passionate and provocative.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Babadook remains a potent journey through the fears, anxieties, and repressed rages of motherhood. The ending, remarkably, gets to have it both ways, reminding us that some of the scariest monsters are the ones we learn to live with.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Lebanon gives us viscerally violent, intensely distressing glimpses into war's annihilation of people, places, and communities.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So what is Hunger? Unexpectedly, a visually ravishing tour of hell and a meditation on freedom that at best is wordlessly profound and at worst interestingly obscure.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Australian rocker Nick Cave talks of how discovering Cohen during his small-town youth "just changed things." Bono calls the singer "our Shelley, our Byron."
  8. Like its subject, Pollock is a messy creation, but one whose depth of commitment and high attack keeps it on track.
    • Boston Globe
  9. Maybe not entirely depersonalized, however. Hogg has a point of view and a point to make, cryptic though they may be.
  10. Beyond its fresh twists on the cop and romance genres, Witness is, above all, an anti-consumption film. [08 Feb 1985]
    • Boston Globe
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All Abrams wants to do is give us a great ride while holding firm to our longstanding emotional investment in these characters.
  11. Time of Favor, which boasts a haunting score, is an unflinching, complex portrait of a modern Israel that is rarely seen on-screen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If you've seen the Beatles documentary "Let It Be," you know what four men who are heartily sick of one another look like, and in 2001, Metallica had been recording twice as long as the Fab Four.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As the title implies, though, Keep on Keepin’ On has more on its mind. The film’s as much about the young Kauflin’s struggles — as a 21st-century Asian-American naïf trying to succeed in a 20th-century art form created by African-Americans, as a blind man navigating the often callous New York jazz scene. It’s also about the ongoing health of jazz itself as the music recedes further from the mainstream into the protective world of festivals and small clubs.
  12. Despite the self-conscious derivativeness and allusions, Tsai’s debut already demonstrates the contrariness and motifs that have distinguished him as a unique, difficult, and transcendent filmmaker.

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