Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,885 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Mr. Turner
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
5885 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s a galvanizing, tragicomic work of 21st-century schadenfreude, marred only by a barely repressed giddiness on the part of the filmmakers.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So what is Hunger? Unexpectedly, a visually ravishing tour of hell and a meditation on freedom that at best is wordlessly profound and at worst interestingly obscure.
  1. Is it an allegory for contemporary Greece? Beats me. Like the films of Buñuel, it’s about the human condition, regarded with bemusement and acuity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Australian rocker Nick Cave talks of how discovering Cohen during his small-town youth "just changed things." Bono calls the singer "our Shelley, our Byron."
  2. Like its subject, Pollock is a messy creation, but one whose depth of commitment and high attack keeps it on track.
    • Boston Globe
  3. Maybe not entirely depersonalized, however. Hogg has a point of view and a point to make, cryptic though they may be.
  4. Beyond its fresh twists on the cop and romance genres, Witness is, above all, an anti-consumption film. [08 Feb 1985]
    • Boston Globe
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All Abrams wants to do is give us a great ride while holding firm to our longstanding emotional investment in these characters.
  5. Time of Favor, which boasts a haunting score, is an unflinching, complex portrait of a modern Israel that is rarely seen on-screen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If you've seen the Beatles documentary "Let It Be," you know what four men who are heartily sick of one another look like, and in 2001, Metallica had been recording twice as long as the Fab Four.
  6. Visually, it has the intense intimacy of a dream.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The dialogue is terse and funny while hinting at much larger matters, such as the way poverty can be handed from generation to generation like a bad gene or a disease.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As the title implies, though, Keep on Keepin’ On has more on its mind. The film’s as much about the young Kauflin’s struggles — as a 21st-century Asian-American naïf trying to succeed in a 20th-century art form created by African-Americans, as a blind man navigating the often callous New York jazz scene. It’s also about the ongoing health of jazz itself as the music recedes further from the mainstream into the protective world of festivals and small clubs.
  7. Despite the self-conscious derivativeness and allusions, Tsai’s debut already demonstrates the contrariness and motifs that have distinguished him as a unique, difficult, and transcendent filmmaker.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A bleakly funny character study of a very particular species of urban fauna - the sports radio call-in fanatic - Big Fan’ is compulsively watchable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You never know where Mother is going to go next. All you know is that you're in the hands of a master with an appreciably bent sense of humor.
  8. The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
  9. Like another documentary set in North Dakota, Jesse Moss’s “The Overnighters,” they follow the story for months as it unfolds, offering no editorial guidance except dates and places and a soundtrack by T. Griffith that underscores the growing angst and pending horror. Welcome to Leith. Say goodbye to certitude.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    After 152 epic minutes, ‘Lake of Fire’ comes down to this: If you’re not living this woman’s life, maybe you shouldn’t tell her what to do.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is Grade-A agitpop, a mixture of archival footage and cheeky, creative animated reconstruction that's funny and frightening in equal measure.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Gus Van Sant's Gerry is the cinematic equivalent of watching paint dry. I mean that as high praise.
  10. The cinematic equivalent of a high, arching rainbow of a three-pointer from midcourt.
  11. The miraculous thing about Let's Get Lost is that Weber has managed to create something that's both impossibly stylized and unmistakably moral (not judgmental, moral).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Three quarters of Cold Mountain consist of some of the most masterful and absorbing filmmaking of the year. The final quarter is Hollywood business as usual.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is as spare and unvarnished as a wooden temple floating on a lake, but its reflections run deep, and it can ripple your thoughts for months.
  12. Hurtling from the screen with a vigor and importance that are all but absent from contemporary film, it's a deeply moving social drama, raw and gritty in style, shining with moral purpose as it delivers a scathing take-it-into-the-streets critique of feral capitalism and racism. [18 July 1997, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Is Kelly Reichardt the most under-acknowledged great director working in America right now? Her new movie, Certain Women, is one of the glories of this or any other year, but it stays true to Reichardt form, which is to say it’s low-key, allusive, lit up with implied meanings without ever leading us by the hand.
  13. A movingly acted, terrifically old-fashioned World War II picture rethought as a post-colonial rebuke.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Across the board, the performances testify, often hilariously, to the pain these characters feel and inflict but are incapable of expressing.
  14. The decadence is obvious. But true to the Valentino prerogative, it's beautiful - sad, too: a dream life moving into the unknown.

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