Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,161 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Cousin Jules
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
6161 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Fateless looks man's inhumanity to man square in the eye and pronounces it standard operating procedure, and that may be the greater horror.
  1. The film's central drama is not between the former secretary and the filmmaker. It's between McNamara and history.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Tootsie, the story of a man who liberates himself by masquerading as a woman, is the funniest, most revealing comedy since "Annie Hall." [17 Dec 1982]
    • Boston Globe
  2. As Apichatpong erases, once again, the barriers between the celestial and terrestrial, he also does away with the cordons between film genres - this is sci-firomancefamilyreligiousthrillercomedyporn. No video service has a section for that. The only suitable shelf is the one in your soul.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Brokeback may be too polished for some people, too elegantly dispassionate in its study of choked passion.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Dardennes achieve lyricism without seeming to try.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A fitting, expertly made final chapter, freighted with hard-won emotions, shot through with a sense of farewell, and fully aware of the epic stakes involved.
  3. A key point, though, is that all the scientists profiled have staked their careers on this one discovery.
  4. A masterpiece.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Murderball is a paradox: a movie about quadriplegics that insists we look beyond their disability.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Timothy Treadwell was killed, along with his girlfriend, by a rogue bear in October 2003.
  5. A tender genuflection to the women's energies that keep that spinning world from keeling over.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Moneyball is a hilarious and provocative change-up, entertaining without feeling the need to swing for the fences.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Crewdson's work is distinctive, and this film does a great job helping us understand the specific nature of his vision.
  6. I have not seen the film “Fifty Shades of Grey” but I doubt that it evokes the mystery, wit, and eroticism that Peter Strickland’s sumptuously claustrophobic fable of women in love does. All without nudity, bad dialogue, or the requisite wooden acting.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The performances are uniformly excellent, but pride of place goes to Bennett’s Sir James, an upper class twit of Pythonesque proportions. Rarely has a character this moronic been this happy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A cruelly precise, often bleakly comic account of upper-middle-class privilege coming unglued when the cosmos throws a curveball.
  7. As full of joy as pain, it's a perspective we need to see more often.
  8. Who most of these exquisitely costumed people are I have no idea, but they brush past the camera in such rapids of jubilation it's a wonder they don't knock the thing over. I watched most of the film exhilarated, but depressed that I'm not a big Russophile.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It makes politics exciting again.
  9. It's a meditation on life and death, but it's less somber and more light-handed, subtle, and mischievously funny.
    • Boston Globe
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As taut and suspenseful as any fictional mystery.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Room unfolds with the privilege of seeing and experiencing the world for the very first time, which is maybe the best we can ever expect from a medium like the cinema.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a movie that floods you with emotion when you least expect it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You may even feel like dancing in the aisles yourself. Sure, the real world doesn't always work this way. Have you forgotten that this is one of the reasons why we go to movies in the first place?
  10. A miracle of data retrieval as the grown schoolchildren are measured against their footage from the earlier films.
  11. Farnsworth's embodiment of old American values, with their combination of delicacy, reserve, and stand-alone independence, is a one-of-a-kind treasure.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    More than "Unforgiven," more than "Mystic River," it is Clint Eastwood's autumnal masterpiece.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Krisha sucks you into its gradually worsening family dynamic with a confidence of style and a maturity of observation that is remarkable in a home-brewed Kickstarter movie. At times you laugh in horror. At other times you shrink from the screen. There are truths here.
  12. The film shifts back and forth in time. It works like memory that way, but the memories are Johnson’s, not the viewer’s, which makes the absence of some discernible organizing principle a real drawback.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Babadook remains a potent journey through the fears, anxieties, and repressed rages of motherhood. The ending, remarkably, gets to have it both ways, reminding us that some of the scariest monsters are the ones we learn to live with.
  13. At once riveting and heartbreaking. This youngest daughter of Robert F. Kennedy has the good sense — far rarer among documentarians than you’d like to think — not to get in the way of her material.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sachs doesn’t push the tragic aspects of Little Men, but they’re there, looming behind the life-goes-on vibe of the final scenes and waiting for you to work it out on the way home.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Movies like The Kids Are All Right -- beautifully written, impeccably played, funny and randy and true -- don't come along very often.
  14. "In Cold Blood," "Badlands," "The Executioner's Song," and now, joining those grisly milestones on the heartland hit list, and every bit their equal, is Boys Don't Cry.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A haunting experience, one that requires patience (and then some) but that offers spiritual, philosophical, and aesthetic rewards beyond the immediate power of words to describe.
  15. Cinema's greatest caveman meets his ancestors. For us, it's a reassurance: The creative process is astonishingly old and its fruits still surprisingly fresh.
  16. The ending is deeply moving.
  17. We're now far enough from that era that seeing it all again feels like a slap to the face in the same way that watching certain moments in the civil rights epic "Eyes on the Prize" chills your bones. This doesn't have that series' stately magnitude. It's smaller and crasser, but it's comparatively galvanic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Richly allusive and eloquently stylized.
  18. The surehandedly wrought, beautifully acted, almost unbearably tense In the Bedroom is a rare film, not to be missed.
    • Boston Globe
  19. Ten
    The new Abbas Kiarostami film is called Ten, and in it something amazing happens: nothing.
  20. What Hoss is asked to play - and does play with great skill - is the fine line between self-protection and hauteur.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like the best spiritual movies, of whatever faith, "Of Gods and Men" moves us toward a union with the infinite, and when we come to the monks' last supper, the moment is staggeringly powerful.
  21. Newman is an American classic, one of the few actors Hollywood has allowed to age and deepen. He and Nobody's Fool don't so much shine as glow softly and steadily. [13 Jan 1995, p.73]
    • Boston Globe
  22. The movie is also more extraordinary than a mere scenic slideshow.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It isn't often you get to meet the devil in all his glory, but here he is in Deliver Us From Evil, and his name is Father Oliver O'Grady.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The best mainstream film since "E.T.," is an uplifting reminder that Hollywood can still produce truly great entertainment...The plot is so exquisitely developed that divulging anything beyond the basic outline might diminish the joyous surprises that await an audience thirsting for originality in a reactionary medium. [03 July 1985, p.57]
    • Boston Globe
  23. It’s clear To is striving to keep the action gripping and creative. Modestly inspired is more like it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Trust me on this: Go.
  24. Argo is absurdly suspenseful for both of its hours. I've never been this stressed-out watching people shred documents.
  25. Mesmerizing and unforgettable.
  26. It's the best drug-busting movie since ''The French Connection.''
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Odd, moving, strained cinematic poetry.
  27. Nothing as big and strange and right as The Master should feel as effortless as it does. That's not the same as saying that it's light. It's actually heavy. It weighs more than any American film from this or last year. It's the sort of movie that young men aspiring to write the Great American Novel never actually write.
  28. A watchful, winding-down tragedy of a movie that delivers what it promises. As commentary, it's grim. As filmmaking, it's a powerfully disturbing odyssey through the Bucharest health care system.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Fairy tales hew to time-honored story lines, and some may fault The Shape of Water for the traditionalism that underlies its phantasmagoric surface. It’s the getting there that bewitches, though, and a performance by Hawkins that’s smart, scared, furious, profoundly erotic, and regal — all without saying a word. Love doesn’t speak in this movie. Instead, it swims with unparalleled style.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s not a perfect movie, but it may be a great one.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As its title implies, This Is England isn't a hyperstylized head-trip a la "Trainspotting" but a straightforward calling to account.
  29. This is a hard movie to watch, and even more painful to think about.
  30. As the story arcs toward its touching denouement, it’s those quiet moments — imbued with the windswept soul of the landscape — that harbor the most lyrical beauty.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Compston's performance and the downer milieu, presented with appropriate paint-peeling profanity, are more than enough to keep an audience riveted and ultimately moved close to tears.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Baby Driver is the best time I’ve had at the movies in months, and, if the world is too much with you (as it is for many of us these days), you may feel the same. It’s a dazzling diversion, a series of cinematic highs that achieve the giddiness of not great art but great entertainment (and thus art through the back door).
  31. A movie loaded with strange delights.
  32. The immediacy and caprice of violence in The Interrupters are just as strong as in nearly every documentary I've seen about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Barry Levinson's Diner is an extremely clever, slick male fantasy that takes some time to work out its mood and tone but ultimately blossoms into a moving film. [16 Apr 1982]
    • Boston Globe
  33. Spacey is diamond-brilliant in a role that plays as if custom-made for him.
  34. In his eloquent, evenhanded, and meticulously constructed debut documentary, Jason Osder stirs the ashes of this tragedy and sheds new heat and light on such timely issues as the abuse of authority and the violation of the rights of citizens, especially the marginalized and powerless.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A miniature masterpiece of documentary observation.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    She's (Hushpuppy) trying to make sense of this world, and the movie, pitched between realism and fable, is the story of how she finally does. That balance is the key to the movie's magic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The subject is the privileged state of childhood itself - how we're all lucky to have had it and how it so easily floats away from our grasp.
  35. Most of all it's the emotional and spiritual arc of an exile, in all its terrible isolation, that gives ''Before Night Falls'' its power.
    • Boston Globe
  36. The movies are smart -- smarter than you, but not in an off-putting way. Their basic appeal, especially this new one, is that Matt Damon’s killing machine, Jason Bourne, is the cleverest man on earth. And we thrill to his sense of superiority.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Take Shelter plays Curtis's unraveling at daring length. The film will be too slow and dark for some, and it's definitely overlong.
  37. As often happens in films about putting on plays, life imitates art, but in this instance obliquely.
  38. Satisfying in every respect, it's a piece of blue-collar chamber music, never treating the characters cheaply, allowing them a complex entwinement of emotions.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are three Poles in The Pianist -- Szpilman, Polanski, and Frederic Chopin. Of the three, fittingly, Chopin speaks the loudest.
  39. Here the Japanese senses of honor and of shame are particularly entangled. Later in the film, Lu mounts an Imperial Army parade through the Nanking ruins. It's something to see.
  40. Director Tomm Moore (the 2009 Oscar contender “The Secret of Kells”) crafts a traditionally rendered feature whose doe-eyed characters faintly echo Miyazaki yet offer a beauty all their own.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Amy
    Mitch Winehouse has disavowed this movie and his portrayal in it, but it’s hard to argue with the scene where he shows up on St. Lucia, where Amy has fled from the hounds of the global media, with a reality-show camera crew of his own.
  41. With impeccable skill, Akin has made a film roiling with cruelty but guided by tough political optimism. No, we can't all get along, but some us of are trying.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Smartly written and beautifully played, The Savages is about that point in life where you look around and realize that where you are is probably as far as you're going to get. In spite of this, the movie's a comedy, dry and humane.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Lebanon gives us viscerally violent, intensely distressing glimpses into war's annihilation of people, places, and communities.
  42. Butler's approach is subtle: His documentary allows the story to unfold elegantly, without embellishment, and it is more powerful for that restraint.
  43. Subtlety and irony are not among the film’s virtues.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the best, most karmically satisfying comedies of the year, much to the chagrin of the people who are in it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie captures that heady adolescent sense of time stopping and the moment mattering while standing far enough back to let us acknowledge all the pitfalls Marieme is moving too fast to see.
  44. The miraculous thing about Let's Get Lost is that Weber has managed to create something that's both impossibly stylized and unmistakably moral (not judgmental, moral).
  45. As funny as it is sharp.
  46. Debbie gets away with being such a cauldron of extremes because the airy-voiced Mann is extremely good at playing them. She happens to be Apatow's wife (the kids in the movie are theirs), and with the possible exception of Téa Leoni , it's hard to imagine who else could get away with this combination of needling and affection.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ghobadi shows us a world where a village pond can hold both rare goldfish and unforgivable evil, and where every step is onto booby-trapped terrain.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    When The Departed roars to life, as it does in so many of its scenes, you feel like nobody understands movies -- the delirious highs, the unforgiving moral depths -- as well as this man does. Welcome back, Marty.
  47. A heady flow of brilliant stupidity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is as spare and unvarnished as a wooden temple floating on a lake, but its reflections run deep, and it can ripple your thoughts for months.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Extraordinary.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A delightfully deranged steampunk adventure.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Best of all, An Education isn’t alarmist. It knows other people can’t seduce us if we don’t seduce ourselves first and that Jenny is level-headed enough to handle it and learn.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In its attention to detail and awareness of betrayals both political and human, "Tinker Tailor'' is a movie for grown-ups.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Gosling may be the soul of Half Nelson, but Epps is the film's heart.
  48. Setting aside, just for a moment, his general loathsomeness, there is a case to be made for a less apparent aspect of Benito Mussolini: He was once really hot.

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