Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,738 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 City of Refuge
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
1,738 music reviews
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where “good kid” was a perceptive look at Lamar’s adolescence in a small part of Los Angeles, Butterfly is a weary assessment of his adulthood, and a world that’s bigger, more complex, and more flawed that he knew. If the albums share anything, it’s that they’re both cinematic. But the movie Lamar is shooting now puts the current era into a more fitting frame.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Backed by his new band the Vanguard, to whom the album is jointly credited, his sprawling funk grooves and pointed (if characteristically indecipherable) lyrics are still strikingly timely.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For all of the gussy rhythms--which can stop just this side of overly cute--and legit power, there’s real subtlety at work, too, and in unlikely spots.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Maybe it's not surprising that My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy is so seamlessly his personal best.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The hits (“I Will Always Love You,’’ “9 to 5’’) are here, but the rarities make this box set essential listening for diehards and newbies alike.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Heard in its complete, unruly, sometimes crazed glory, Miles at the Fillmore shows just how furious the evolutionary pace of his music was at this point.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Channel Orange stands strong on its own merits.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The highs wouldn’t feel so high without the lows here, which is a regular trope of the genre; but as with all tropes, execution trumps invention, and the Hotelier executes exceptionally.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Compton MC's long-awaited major label debut is a breakthrough, as he both resurrects and reinvents West Coast hip-hop.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's both jarring and exhilarating how disjointed the record often feels, from the dreamy Tin Pan Alley balladry of "Sir Greendown'' to the Screamin' Jay Hawkins freakout "Come Alive (War of the Roses).''
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Guitar Song comes grouped in two parts, a "Black Album" and a "White Album," structured, according to Johnson, as a progressive movement from a dark and sordid beginning to a reassuring and redemptive end. That structure isn't always discernable in listening. What is immediately evident, though, is that this is a phenomenal collection of country music.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As it stands, Stevens’s words drive these songs, and not always in the most linear fashion. Lyrics that meander in unruly metric on the page are parsed into eloquent couplets that, somehow, sound conversational.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Thrilling and joyous, fierce and focused, the women sound like they’re having the time of their lives sinking their teeth back into the music together.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album bubbles over with insidious grooves, inventive samples, and lissome rhyming about things frivolous and fraught.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Musically, the band mixes its customary blast beat-driven grindcore maelstroms--the punishing one-two assault of “Smash a Single Digit” and “Metaphorically Screw You,” the layered, complex “Cesspits”--with industrial dolor (“Dear Slum Landlord”) and junk-bin clangor (the title track): caustic nods to influential circa-early ’80s noise-mongers like Public Image Ltd. and Swans.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Apple has been here before, but it makes her new album no less arresting.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of the phrasing on "MPP" sticks; some of it soars; most of it slips and slides through puddles of rich sonic texture. Only at a distance does the magic of the whole major-key mess become clear.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album isn't as heady as She Wolf, but there's an easy charm to how Shakira deftly navigates such a mash of genres.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even the very concept of a songwriter laying down a plethora of new songs in his publisher's office for others to perform feels out-of-time - quaintly and genuinely so.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nobody else is doing what Holter is doing, and it’s well worth following her lead.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His first album of new material since 2004's "Real Gone," it's also one of Waits's most balanced works in recent memory.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's that sprawling sense of humanity that makes Dear Science such a rich listen.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An existential crisis has never sounded like so much fun as it does in Barnett’s songs.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In Rainbows is a wonderful, absorbing album.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Invisible Cinema is the opposite of a silent film. The soundtrack is provided; the listener brings the visuals.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Less glitchy and bass-led than FlyLo’s previous work, it enters him in the canon of mystics and psychedelic journeyers who’ve sought to crack the doors of perception.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Exit, which was mixed and recorded on a laptop, using a popular program called Pro Tools, is a tribute to the unexpected beauty of everyday things.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album manages to co-opt elements of the Beach Boys - soaring harmonies, tack piano, orchestral arrangements - yet doesn't particularly sound as if it were recorded by the group.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the sound of mbv is reassuringly familiar--openers “she found now” and “only tomorrow” tread melodic paths that seem strangely familiar even as they wander--its newness is remarkable.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'We Call Upon the Author to Explain' goes the title of one song, but Cave offers no explanations and no justifications merely another lean, assured set of glamorously gloomy songs.