Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,101 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Simpsons: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Twenty Good Years: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 535
  2. Negative: 0 out of 535
535 tv reviews
  1. This is a show that has taken the comedic rhythms of TV to a different level, that moves at the slower, more intimate pace of an independent film.
  2. The creeping sense of dread has been part of what has made Breaking Bad so engrossing.
  3. Extraordinary. [2 Mar 2001]
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  4. Amazing. [20 June 2005, p.B7]
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  5. The best new network dramatic series since "Shannon's Deal" and "Twin Peaks" in 1990. [29 Jan 1993, p.21]
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  6. Nip/ Tuck also remains gorgeously sick...The makers of Nip/ Tuck never keep it simple, which is simply excellent. [20 Sept 2005, p.C6]
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  7. It offers a great cast, and some very tight, tart scripting. Each of the season's seven half-hours is a little sliver of pleasure.
  8. It's a riveting indication of what Lynch can do without words. Simple shots of traffic lights and waterfalls are enough to send chills up the spine.
  9. Like the extraordinary Elizabeth Strout novel-in-stories that it’s based on, HBO’s Olive Kitteridge accumulates with steady, earned drama into a searing portrait of quiet desperation. It’s sad, unsentimental, and lovely.
  10. Game of Thrones continues to impress with its ability to depict how intimate choices can have epic consequences, and vice versa. Each of the actors rises to that challenge, whether playing opposite one person or a multitude of extras.
  11. This extraordinary upstairs-downstairs drama, written by Oscar-winning "Gosford Park" screenwriter Julian Fellowes, is a dramatic, intelligent, soapy, comic, and wise piece of work, one that explores social shifts on the eve of World War I while delivering a remarkably engaging cast of characters.
  12. While The Corner may sound like just more preachy TV cliches about drug abuse and African-American self-destruction, it is so much more than that. It is about the life and death forces at war in that inner-city staple, The Corner, and it is a jarring introduction to the people behind the statistics and the cliches. I hope it finds an audience, despite its rawness. No one ever said great drama had to be pretty. [14 Apr 2000, p.D1]
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  13. Gabriel Byrne is in every minute of the show, delivering one of TV's most faceted and intriguing performances....All of the new characters promise to engage as their stories and backstories begin to unfold.
  14. A taut exercise in withheld disaster, Breaking Bad is riveting.
  15. The NBC series certainly has been one of TV’s most emotionally honest and stirring works, and it remains so as it enters its fourth season.
  16. It has been top-notch from the start--but in the new episodes available for review, the storytelling is more focused and straightforward, less aggressively confusing for casual viewers.... All you need to like to enjoy this unique series is exceptional and ambitious TV storytelling.
  17. Beautifully written (by Richard LaGravenese) and directed (by Steven Soderbergh), Behind the Candelabra doesn’t quite fit into the biopic genre--simply because it is so good.
  18. It also showcases Milch's taste for complexity when it comes to both the criminal mind and the lawman's motivations. [19 Mar 2004, p.D1]
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  19. The show is back in magnificent form, with all its humor, psychological thorniness, and bleak tragedy intact. It remains the highest peak of series TV.
  20. Proof that the profane can be very, very funny, Arli$$ is not only a tour de force for star/writer/coproducer Robert Wuhl, but a reality-bending kindred spirit to HBO's "The Larry Sanders Show," whose star, Garry Shandling, lurks in the opening-credits cameo. [9 Aug 1996, p.C1]
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  21. AMC’s Mad Men returns for season 6 with two hours that are as rich and as deftly literary as anything in the history of the show. The premiere operates like a series of exquisitely written theatrical set pieces, one after another that add up to a moving, ironic, and often comic group portrait.
  22. The future of TV comedy is a sick one, my friends. A gloriously, brilliantly, deliriously sick one, where a desperate housewife wears a "SLUT" T-shirt on a prison visit, a businessman sells prefab homes to Saddam Hussein, and a pudgy teen lusts after his first cousin. It's a ferociously Freudian future, replete with a pent-up mama's boy, a family-run banana stand, and a disbarred psychiatrist who wears cutoffs beneath his underwear because he's a "Never-nude." That's a phobia about nakedness he's trying to make into a nationally recognized condition...In short, it's Arrested Development. [7 Nov 2004, p.N4]
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    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    "The Larry Sanders Show" brilliantly exploits the medium as it mocks it. [19 Jul 1995]
    • Boston Globe
  23. The show beautifully depicts a massive game of musical chairs, a world at war with doom ever present just across the border.
  24. It is depressing, brilliant, hysterical, excruciating, full of irony, and nothing you'd ever expect to find on American network TV. Rather than sweetening the workplace with fantasies of a home away from home, "The Office" heightens the reality and disconnection of corporate life until it is absurdly funny. The show doesn't touch your heart so much as tickle your spleen. [9 Oct 2003]
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  25. Riveting, gripping, and altogether compelling ... An innovative and expertly executed hour of suspense, '24' is without question the best premiere of the fall season. [6 Nov 2001]
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  26. The show doesn't seem to have lost any ballast moving forward from the intensity of season one.
  27. This is a great piece of TV work... Right from its opening minutes, after a flight to Australia has crashed on the shores of nowhere, ABC's Lost simulates the kind of dread we don't expect to find on the small screen. [22 Sept 2004, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
  28. It's hard to know where to aim the praise first.
  29. It’s a fantastic return to the story, if you’re in no hurry for action and can admire show creator Ray McKinnon’s quietly fraught set pieces.

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