Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,040 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear
Lowest review score: 0 The Skulls
Score distribution:
6040 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Timothy Treadwell was killed, along with his girlfriend, by a rogue bear in October 2003.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A bleakly comic, brutally Darwinian gangland saga that at times comes close to being this year's "Drive." It also does something that, if you're from around these parts, seems downright perverse. It takes the Boston out of George V. Higgins.
  1. If their movie doesn't float your boat as a work of science-fiction, action, philosophy, heliocentrism, or staggering visual spectacle (although, it really should), then it certainly succeeds as a parable for cinematic ambition.
  2. Really the film is a deft first-person character study with a war zone for a background.
  3. What keeps the film going, and helps it keep its comic tone, is the constant threat of cataclysm - and the deadpan Buster Keaton charm of the ever-responsive Pinon as he combats the giant Rube Goldberg meat-grinder that the house, in effect, is. [17 Apr 1992]
    • Boston Globe
  4. This is a film of our times - paranoid, heartbroken, disillusioned - and the rare recent American movie whose characters react the way actual people might.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This startling, assured feature debut from New Hampshire-born, Brooklyn-based writer-director Robert Eggers has one foot in early American history and another in legend and fairy tale.
  5. Varda's charmingly eccentric amble, wise in its seeming waywardness.
    • Boston Globe
  6. There is a great and perhaps unique French cinematic tradition of braiding together love and manners and the past. Think of "Children of Paradise," "Casque d'Or," "The Earrings of Madame de . . .," "Elena and Her Men." Now one can think of The Princess of Montpensier, too.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Inland Empire may be the most aggressively surreal feature film ever released to movie theaters in this country, and it's possibly close to the movie David Lynch carries around in his head.
  7. Wiseman has made several films about both disability and dance, but this new one might be his most hypnotic, rhythmically assembled observation of corporeal expression.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Among the most insane mainstream movies ever released.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The key to why the new ''American'' is so good and so true, though, is Brendan Fraser as the title character.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The hidden message of The Oath is so inescapable as to be Shakespearean: Character will out.
  8. What you're not prepared for in Marziyeh Meshkini's astonishing debut film is the way its central image instantly leaps into the pantheon of world cinema with a rightness and an urgency that glue your eyes to the screen.
  9. The movie observes the general misery of needing serious medical treatment and the particular awfulness of needing medical treatment you can't pay for.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Giants has SO many insistent high points, in fact, that its breathlessness threatens to turn monotonous.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    When The Departed roars to life, as it does in so many of its scenes, you feel like nobody understands movies -- the delirious highs, the unforgiving moral depths -- as well as this man does. Welcome back, Marty.
  10. This is the epidemic from love's point of view, a story as much about how the disease can ravage the heart as it does the body. It is also Téchiné's best film since 1998's superb "Alice et Martin," and 1994's even better "Wild Reeds."
  11. AKA
    The triptych is a device but never a gimmick: three windows into one fractured soul.
  12. The film's triumph - and it is a triumph - in the end rests on the ability of Hrebejk and his actors to convince us that they never stop being normal people.
    • Boston Globe
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A near-masterpiece of mood and menace, and one that deserves to be seen on the largest screen possible.
  13. Enormously enjoyable.
  14. Revanche was a foreign-language Oscar nominee this year, and it's a better movie than most of the films in the main race. The word "revanche" means "revenge" in German, but "waiting" would have been just as good.
  15. In The Hurt Locker, the thrill is unexpectedly contagious. You don't realize how riveted you are until you're back on American soil observing James in civilian life.
  16. It starts with a flyboy roasting franks in the exhaust of a combat jet and never lets up, giddily puncturing all those wartime flying hero movies and throwing in a heap of movie parodies besides. Either way, the pacing is jetstreamed and the level of inventiveness is sky-high. [31 July 1991, p.25]
    • Boston Globe
  17. Moore's roving essay feels even more urgent now than it did when the jury had to make up an award to honor it at the Cannes film festival in May.
  18. As savage and as epic as film gets.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Too often the movies view the problems of Africa through Western eyes, but "Devil" turns that weakness to a literal strength, because Steidle could do nothing in his position except take photographs.
  19. Fighting has real grit and excellent acting. In other words, there is gold in that dirt.

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