Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,356 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 I'm the One That I Want
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5,356 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You come away impressed, oppressed, provoked, and beaten down, holding on to Ledger's squirrelly incandescence as a beacon in the darkness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Burma VJ’ retorts that eyes and ears are everywhere in our ever-tightening global communications mesh. Voices, too, and they get heard. The generals and the ayatollahs have every right to be scared.
  1. There's a restraint to Mademoiselle Chambon that's more English than French. Emotions get repressed more often than expressed.
  2. Mysteries of Lisbon brings us far inside oil-on-canvas in a way that isn't imitative. It's simply, magically a moving picture, what a movie in the 1800s would look like.
  3. It is a delight for flamenco fans and provides a fascinating introduction for those unfamiliar with the music. But as cinema, despite the lush cinematography of Vittorio Storaro, it is lacking.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Does what too many independent American movies only pretend to do: Takes you to an unnoticed corner of our country and shows what it's like to actually live there.
  4. Drugstore Cowboy, Gus Van Sant's fresh, gutsy societal underbelly film, never wallows in picturesque down-and-outism, except at the end, when Dillon's character, frightened by the death of a girl he didn't like much and spooked by his own paranoiac suspicion, checks into a seedy hotel while trying to go cold turkey and not yield to the influence of a junkie priest drolly played by William Burroughs. [27 Oct 1989]
    • Boston Globe
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of those lovely little movies that starts out being about a handful of people and ends up being about all of us. That’s a tricky act to pull off and the talented writer-director Ira Sachs stumbles occasionally over moments of self-conscious lyricism. But then the film recovers its balance, looks at its characters with fondness and with faith, and quietly soars.
  5. Intriguing, arresting, delightfully refusing to be pigeonholed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's spookily touching to see this massed group of former rock gods gathered to honor one of their fallen. Bald spots and graying shags predominate; the giant velvet lapels of 1969 have given way to sensible sport coats; the granny glasses are for real.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The anti-"Kill Bill." This is an old man's movie in all the good ways: gentle, humanistic, rich with observation, quietly aware of all that can't be solved by the sword.
  6. Eerily tragic and chillingly hard to come to terms with.
  7. What Stranger by the Lake lacks in suspense and back story it makes up for in atmosphere: It’s a subtle exercise in the pathetic fallacy.
  8. It's a thriller that refuses to thrill. It taunts us with resolution and mysteries, then slaps our hand for reaching out for a conclusion.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s rooted in observed reality and idiosyncratic individuals. It’s possible, Silva is saying, to live among people and still be terribly, crushingly isolated.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This is a warts 'n' all portrayal - there's no dodging the feelings of both disgust and amusement.
    • Boston Globe
  9. The magic of their perfectly shaded performances is that you always have to wonder ... Is she really that bad?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the first time, though, his (Mortensen)performance seemed so much bigger than the film surrounding it. That he manages the feat with so few wasted gestures puts him in line with the greats.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Grueling yet ultimately exhilarating.
  10. The observations coalesce into a cogent whole, providing insights that are never overtly stated.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Mao had it wrong; in ''Revolution,'' political power comes out of the barrel of a TV tube.
  11. The film has the perverse intelligence of Cronenberg's other movies. It's not his best, but it is certainly his most accessible, least stagy work, obeying the laws of chronology and serving up characters whom we recognize as people.
  12. It's flawed, but it's also rich. And how many films make you feel that you and the filmmaker are following the course of a dream?
    • Boston Globe
  13. Full of redeeming throwaways.
  14. Hooper, the director, doesn’t include lots of amazing football sequences to upstage his star. He just moves everyone out of Sheen’s way. It’s about time.
  15. It's one of the great sister movies and one of the great performance movies. [26 Jan 1996]
    • Boston Globe
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    That smart, hip, human comedy you've been waiting for all year.
  16. The world of cinema is richer for the voice of Al Mansour; she speaks for the women of her country, and for people everywhere.
  17. The secret here is that the movie is rather tasteless. It has the high, slightly nauseating stink of perfume on garbage.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a slap-happy movie and often scurrilously funny — the sound of a gifted comic mind finally finding its onscreen voice.

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