Checkout.com's Scores

  • Music
For 59 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 69% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Figure 8
Lowest review score: 30 Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 40 out of 59
  2. Negative: 1 out of 59
59 music reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If Binaural were Pearl Jam's first effort, it would receive little notice and get panned for its lack of focus and abundant musical mediocrity.
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    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    "Learning How to Smile" has compelling subject matter in its reminiscence of love among the white trash ruins, but its climactic strings and cheery chords feel like a theme song to the latest WB teen-sex drama.
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    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sometimes reminiscent of classic English prog-rockers the Moody Blues and the correlating Electric Light Orchestra (as in "Rescue" and "Girl Eyes"), Eve 6 mostly sounds like a safer version of their numeric brethren Third Eye Blind, Blink 182 and even matchbox twenty
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    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The band's edge has dulled considerably, in spite of guitarists Kyle Cook and Adam Gaynor's best efforts on "Angry" and "Mad Season," but for the most part they're heavily sedated throughout, as are bassist Brian Yale and drummer Paul Doucette, begging the question: Where's the band?
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    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Vapor Transmission, the follow-up to Orgy's 1998 debut, Candyass, is as sci-fi, inorganic and over-produced as the title implies. Sometimes the stainless steel robotics work, and sometimes they don't.
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    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Being that the band's name is derivative, so are many of these Thirteen Tales they tell.
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    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At the Drive-In (from El Paso, Texas) picks up where Jane's Addiction leaves off, emitting that thin, distinctive Perry Farrell upper register vocal amid a post-punk apocalyptic guitar/bass/drums detonation. Good for the Addiction, not so good for the Drive-In.
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    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On his new album, You're the One, the singer's lyrics are masterful as ever, but their emotional punch is compromised considerably by syrupy melodies and uninspired production.
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    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Slim's Halfway only reaches heaven twice (Macy Gray's two star turns), and otherwise trolls, not in a gutter, but in what feels like interminable traffic. Most of Halfway's songs extend past the five minute mark, and like a movie that hasn't felt the firming up of a good editor's hands, they feel way too long. If guest vocalist Macy Gray hadn't shown up for Fatboy's party, Halfway might be the year's biggest letdown.
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    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unfortunately seems to lack that goofiness that had previously made them one of rock-and-roll's coolest nerd bands.
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    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sun's production is disappointingly safe, walking down a very predictable, somewhat dated road, instead of machete-chopping a path of its own.... [Its] most dazzling moments are its most straightforward -- the ones where Mullins strips away his affectations and flashes naked emotion.
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    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With Road Rock weighing top-heavy with some of Crazy Horse's finest moments, Young's all-star friends just can't punch with that band's battle-proven viciousness. Not that Neil doesn't compensate -- as always, he's top-shelf, shredding his guitar with a torrent of electric snarl and broken string.
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    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Kid's rapping is righteous, he's a fine vocalist, and like most musicians, his appalling persona contradicts his renown as a sweetheart of a guy. Nonetheless, as History repeats itself, his constant bragging only serves to undermine his credibility, and as a result, he becomes an idiotic parody of his own sick constructs.
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    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Does the world really need another mediocre pop-rock album rife with trite lyrics, aimless melodies and bloated production?
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    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While Two Against Nature certainly has its moments, it doesn't catch your ear with the crafty songsmith of Steely Dan past.
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    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Black & Blue finds the Boys traveling all-too-familiar prefab-pop terrain (production-wise, it's the sonic twin of teen queen Britney's most recent effort), with overwhelmingly forgettable results.
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    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rule's sandblasted voice is as memorable as ever. But his unmistakable vocal presence is wasted on joints that fall way short of the impact made by his breakthrough hit ["Holla, Holla"].
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    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Though the album finds Osborne a blues-belting, soul-sizzling, R&B vocalist... most of the songs just don't work in spite of the fact that all of Osborne's ducks (lyrics, music, arrangements and production) are lined up nicely.... Osborne's musical diversity and experimentation are brave actions in the face of the smothering homogeneity that continues to invade the art form, but even the most excellent elements will fall to certain ruination if miscombined.
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