Chicago Reader's Scores

  • Movies
For 4,911 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Lowest review score: 0 The Boy in the Striped Pajamas
Score distribution:
4,911 movie reviews
  1. Charlie Chaplin finally got around to acknowledging the 20th century in this 1936 film, which substitutes machine-age gags for the fading Victoriana of his other work. Consequently, it's the coldest of his major features, though no less brilliant for it.
  2. It's one of the best movies about revolutionary and anticolonial activism ever made, convincing, balanced, passionate, and compulsively watchable as storytelling.
  3. A heartfelt, passionate, tragic musical suite made up of these formulas, which the film both celebrates and wryly examines to discover their inner logic: how they actually work, what they do and don't do.
  4. An exhilarating update of "Flash Gordon," very much in the same half-jokey, half-earnest mood, but backed by special effects that, for once, really work and are intelligently integrated with the story.
  5. A highly emotional epic about what it means to be both Chinese and American.
  6. A Chayefsky movie isn't hard to identify, but I think it's safe to say that these days a Charlie Kaufman movie is even more recognizable.
  7. Duvall’s direction of a mix of professional and nonprofessional actors, especially in the extended church sessions, is never less than masterful.
  8. Guy Maddin has reached a new expressive plateau with The Saddest Music in the World.
  9. The result was one of Bergman's most haunting and suggestive films.
  10. All-expert cast.
  11. A veritable salad of mixed genres and emotional textures, this exciting black-and-white cold war thriller runs more than two hours and never flags for an instant...A powerful experience, alternately corrosive with dark parodic humor, suspenseful, moving, and terrifying.
  12. Riveting cinematic essay.
  13. One of the most perfect endings of any film that comes to mind.
  14. Mesmerizing.
  15. The film's superb first two hours, which weave social and historical themes into rich personal drama, turn out to be only a prelude to the magnificent final hour--an extended ballroom sequence that leaves history behind to become one of the most moving meditations on individual mortality in the history of the cinema. (Review of 1983 Release)
  16. The result is both thrilling and thoughtful.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's something of a masterpiece: a confessional experimental documentary with echoes, both conscious and unconscious, of filmmakers from Andy Warhol to John Cassavetes, Stan Brakhage to David Lynch.
  17. This is a masterwork by Ousmane Sembene, the 81-year-old father of African cinema and one of Senegal's greatest novelists.
  18. A grand-style, idiosyncratic war epic, with wonderful poetic ideas, intense emotions, and haunting images rich in metaphysical portent.
  19. Wong Kar-wai's idiosyncratic style first became apparent in this gorgeously moody second feature.
  20. Zhang weaves in both thrilling martial-arts set pieces and stunning studies of period silk tapestry and costume.
  21. Haggis's dialogue is worthy of Hemingway, and the three leads border on perfection.
  22. The overall mood is stately and melancholy, the selective use of color is ravishing, and some of the natural views are breathtaking.
  23. Throughout the film cause and effect, the mainspring of most narratives, is replaced by a sense of spiritual synchronicity.
  24. Its special effects are used so seamlessly as part of an overall artistic strategy that, as critic Annette Michelson has pointed out, they don't even register as such, and thus are almost impossible to trivialize, a feat unmatched in movies.
  25. Possibly the most daring and honest drama about sexuality I've ever seen.
  26. At the very least, it's more honest and involved in its portraiture of American soldiers in Iraq than anything TV news of any political persuasion has given us.
  27. Most comedies start with a straight story and hang jokes on it; Solondz begins with a cosmic joke and takes his characters by the hand as they suffer through it.
  28. The movie's dreamlike spaces and characters are sometimes worthy of Lewis Carroll.
  29. Hou's best film since "The Puppetmaster" (1993). It's also his most minimalist effort to date, slow to reveal its depths and beauties, and it marks a rejuvenation of his art.

Top Trailers