Chicago Reader's Scores

  • Movies
For 4,965 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
Lowest review score: 0 Psycho
Score distribution:
4965 movie reviews
  1. Ten
    The film offers a fascinating glimpse of the Iranian urban middle class, and though it eschews most of the pleasures of composition and landscape found in other Kiarostami films, it's never less than riveting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Absorbing, beautiful documentary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a lyrical heartbreaker that skirts most love-story cliches and is brave enough to be as inconclusive as the characters.
  2. The first Ang Lee film I've seen that I've liked without qualification.
  3. Todd Phillips is no artist, but his lowbrow comedies (Road Trip, Old School) always hit the mark because they're so psychologically true: the superego tries to control the id, but the id gets drunk and barfs all over it. Hilarious.
  4. It's easy to suspend disbelief and embrace this historically creative fiction, whose clever relationship to what's known and what's unresolved is part of what makes it so intriguing and so romantic.
  5. Brutally honest and brilliantly acted.
  6. That rare sequel that surpasses the original.
  7. Brett Morgen (The Kid Stays in the Picture) has made an electrifying picture.
  8. Unprecedented in its intellectual ambition, this is endlessly stimulating; it probably tries for too much, but it shames many other contemporary essays that try for too little.
  9. For all its minimalism, Tsai Ming-liang's 81-minute masterpiece manages to be many things at once.
  10. Provost and cowriter Marc Abdelnour explore the mutable boundaries between spirituality, naivete, genius, and madness, showing how the two outsiders and polar opposites cultivated a mutual understanding.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Reeks with decay and sexuality.
  11. It's scary and hilarious, with a magical, nonrealist tone, and it emphasizes physical comedy as much as disturbing, beautifully integrated metaphors.
  12. A movie whose story may be even more innovative than the superreal solidity of the animated characters.
  13. Ran
    A stunning achievement in epic cinema.
  14. Levinson's dialogue feels fresh and improvised, yet it hits its mark every time, and the performances he gets are complex and original (particularly from Mickey Rourke, who plays a lothario with a late-blooming conscience) - enough so that Levinson's occasional forced "cinematic" effects cause barely a ripple in the smooth, naturalistic surface.
  15. Kiarostami's brilliantly suggestive script, which is quite unlike anything else he's written and is marred only slightly by one of his obligatory sages turning up gratuitously near the beginning.
  16. "Weird but cool," as one character says -- yet the movie is also remarkably touching.
  17. Hammer overplays his indie hand with an abrupt and unsatisfactory ending, but his three leads are so credible that their aching, tongue-tied characters linger in the memory.
  18. Leigh pushes the story in a more interesting direction, asking whether people find happiness or simply will it on themselves.
  19. Woo's third Hollywood movie, Face/Off, is the first to balance his visual imagination with the emotional intensity of his Hong Kong films.
  20. The film is both wise and tender in its treatment of relationships -- between birds, between people, and between birds and people.
  21. Exhilarating.
  22. Tarkovsky's eerie mystic parable is given substance by the filmmaker's boldly original grasp of film language and the remarkable performances by all the principals.
  23. Sumptuously hued in its emotional and visual tones, this drama is also a fairy tale, its plot contrivances beautifully justified by its minimalism.
    • Chicago Reader
  24. Writer-director Jeff Nichols maintains a cagey balancing act for much of the movie, refusing to specify whether his protagonist is a prophet or a madman, yet in the end this doesn't really matter: the storm inside him is plenty real.
  25. Months after seeing this, I still feel I know most of these people as if they were old friends.
  26. A witty, canny meditation on the power of pop culture in general and the rationalizations of cinephilia and film criticism in particular.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A virtuoso performance by Al Pacino and some expert location work by Sidney Lumet add up to a tour de force genre piece. (Review of Original Release)

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