Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 4,422 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Fallen Idol (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius
Score distribution:
4,422 movie reviews
  1. Freshman Orientation is not incompetently made. Nor is it badly acted. But there’s not a fresh idea in it, and everyone on screen seems to be in a different comedy.
  2. Lapica isn't yet enough of a writer or director (or an actor) to make the dramatic arc unpredictable in any way. It may be effective for some as therapy. It is far less so as cinematic storytelling.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    As a pocket history of the battles over Jerusalem in the ’40s, O Jerusalem is serviceable enough. But all the melodrama cheapens the real drama, and turns a war-torn region into a soap-opera stage.
  3. I find Lars and the Real Girl adorable in the worst way, bailed out only by most every member of its excellent cast.
  4. All you want from a movie like this, really, is a little brainless fun, and it keeps holding out on you. Everyone looks fatigued. Even Cage’s toupee seems ambivalent about having signed on for a sequel.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    While director Eric Valette provides the occasional chill, the disturbing spooks aren't enough to make this boat float. Burns sleepwalks through One Missed Call totally devoid of charisma, and Sossamon muddles along, going through the motions.
  5. Diane Keaton--now there’s a trouper for you. She will not be caught giving less than 110 percent, even in a drab little heist comedy.
  6. CJ7
    CJ7 is roughly as grating as that “Flubber” remake.
  7. The latest, Untraceable, owes everything to “Lambs,” and to “Se7en,” and to all the “Lambs” and “Se7en” knockoffs made by directors less talented than Jonathan Demme and David Fincher. In addition to being dull, the Portland, Ore. -set Untraceable is a monster hypocrite, wagging its finger at the mass audience’s appetite for strictly regimented, “creative” torture scenarios.
  8. Jumper, the film, goes everywhere and nowhere.
  9. The court scenes are rarely funny, either in the trash talk or the slapstick.
  10. As generic as its title, College Road Trip feels like a first draft, the one the studio brings to the rewrite team that, in this case, never got hired.
  11. Despite honorable work from Theron, Robb and Stahl, Sleepwalking makes good on its title in a not-so-good way.
  12. Moving slowly these days, Reynolds does less than no acting in this role, and he’s still the best thing in Deal.
  13. Dempsey's pleasant enough, but he hasn't yet learned how to play against a mediocre script's obviousness. Monaghan has, which is gratifying.
  14. The screenplay by Dana Fox (she was one of the rewriters of "27 Dresses") devolves into a series of humiliating pranks that always give the upper narrative hand to the male lead. Talk about depressing. I mean, that's what male screenwriters are for--to unfairly stack the deck against the female leads.
  15. Staggers and wanders and feels far longer than its 85 minutes, and it's best considered a calling card for better things to come.
  16. After the insufferably dense mermaid mythology of "Lady in the Water," Shyamalan clearly wanted to keep things simple. He whizzed straight past "simple" to simplistic.
  17. The Love Guru”does not bring out Myer's best, and aside from a deft early Bollywood parody, there’s nothing visually to help the fun along.
  18. Not even Smith's charisma can mitigate the chaos that is Hancock.
  19. The film has one objective: to smack its audience in the face with fleeting, competing wows, over and over.
  20. It wanders and putters and follows its main characters around.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    On your deathbed you will want back the time it takes to see this one.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    It's almost always rewarding to watch an underdog triumph--what else could explain why movies exactly like this keep being made?--but Longshots is one underdog that's hard to love and harder still to champion.
  21. The appeal of the film version, such as it is, relates almost entirely to eye-for-an-eye, severed-limb-for-a-limb vengeance, two hours and 41 minutes of it, with just enough solemnity to make anyone who thought "The Dark Knight" was a little gassy think twice about which superhero myth THEY'RE calling gassy.
  22. It's a seriously withholding action comedy, stingy on the wit, charm, jokes, narrative satisfactions and animals with personalities sharp enough for the big screen, either in 2-D or 3-D.
  23. The movie itself is hyperactive and a jumble.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    It's a high-powered cast, but it has painfully little to work with, apart from widely varying humor.
  24. Ritchie, who shoots and cuts everything in RocknRolla like an ad for a particularly greasy brand of fragrance for men, delivers the beatings and killings in his trademark atmosphere of morally weightless flash.
  25. It's rather sweet to think of Filth and Wisdom as Madonna's reconnection to her own boho Manhattan striver self a generation ago, and I did enjoy the last five minutes or so, when the movie essentially stopped and Hutz's band, Gogol Bordello, took over.

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