Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 4,531 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Mystic River
Lowest review score: 0 UHF
Score distribution:
4,531 movie reviews
  1. Despite valiant efforts from Czerny and from the fine stage actress Vilma Silva, who plays one of Walsch's many saviors, the result would qualify as a blandly inspirational amateur hour if the running time weren't closer to two.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    This ultimately disappointing comedy starts reasonably strong, delivers a few good laughs, then rolls over and plays dead.
  2. It's reductive, insanely violent slapstick, but that's the phenomenon in a nutshell.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    A cutesy, heavy-handed morality tale that contains nary a believable moment.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Illegal Tender echoes "A History of Violence," another gritty film that explores escaping a criminal past. But the vast vapidity behind Illegal Tender's ill-conceived story line is far harder to overcome.
  3. This was a mission that should have been aborted long ago.
  4. Williams' grimace is starting to look desperate. Then again, no one comes off well in director Ken Kwapis' handling of this greasy screenplay.
  5. John Waters is back with this awfully bawdy, never sexy, rarely funny, actually boring, one-note sex comedy.
  6. In the end you don't believe what you're watching, and you don't care. This party is a drag.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    The Ten changes tone every few minutes, ranging from lowbrow gross-out gags to elevated language to a big, sloppy musical number.
  7. The screenplay by Dana Fox (she was one of the rewriters of "27 Dresses") devolves into a series of humiliating pranks that always give the upper narrative hand to the male lead. Talk about depressing. I mean, that's what male screenwriters are for--to unfairly stack the deck against the female leads.
  8. All the obligatory plot elements are there. Love and loss, anger and forgiveness, illness and death. But they never flow together to make a coherent story. Instead, they just pop up whenever the script is in trouble. Which is all the time.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    This new Friday the 13th, unquestionably savvier and snappier than the original "Friday the 13th," though just as useless, is a needed return to simplicity.
  9. Not so much character-driven as character-dragged--against its will.
  10. The Nome King looks like a moveable Mt. St. Helens and he alone is magical. In fact, he blows Dorothy and her tacky-looking friends off the screen. So we end up liking the Nome King and hating Dorothy and her crowd, which I doubt was the intention of the L. Frank Baum series. [21 Jun 1985, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  11. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone serves as a reminder that everything in a film has a chance to go wrong before a film begins filming. In other words: It's the script, stupid.
  12. A contemporary teen summer romance with a modern sexual twist--though in many ways, it's just the same old malarkey.
  13. Boasts one moment, perhaps three or four seconds in length, so delightfully intense and uncharacteristically juicy that the rest of the film - most of the rest of the whole series, in fact - looks pretty pale by comparison. Not vampire pale. Paler.
  14. G
    Cherot shot G on a tight schedule, but instead of this age-old indie predicament generating a certain scrappy passion, the film just looks cheap.
  15. Gordon is lost, and his style of shooting - telescopic close-ups, which never give us enough space to appreciate the performers - feels wrong for comedy.
  16. Phony, disingenuous family entertainment, suffocated by its green bean casserole approach to Middle America, spineless cardboard characters and paper-thin plot "twists."
  17. Just another self-absorbed teen chronicle, with the added twist of a little time travel and a surprise ending.
  18. The movie plays like a very expanded version of what would make -- and likely has made -- a cute TV newsmagazine segment.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    There is a great, even revolutionary movie to be made about pharmaceutical companies in America. Side Effects is definitely not it.
  19. There's nothing original about the father-son conflict that forms the core of the film, nor is there enough suspense and drama.
  20. Director Monteverde, whose previous feature, "Bella," came out nine years ago, clearly meant his film to lift up everyone and condescend to no one, least of all Pepper and Hashimoto. But Little Boy comes off as a picture-postcard fake.
  21. Combine the uninhibited raunchiness of John Waters with the gross-out zeal of the Farrelly brothers and you get Another Gay Movie, a parody and comedy more numbingly disgusting than funny.
  22. A weak romantic comedy.
  23. Gere and Binoche are both terribly miscast--one far too charismatic, the other far too dowdy, which is something for Juliette Binoche. And the spelling bees? Dull. Dreary.
  24. Worth your time and money? Fuhgeddaboutit.
    • Chicago Tribune

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