Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 596 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Curb Your Enthusiasm: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Luis: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 302
  2. Negative: 0 out of 302
302 tv reviews
  1. The performances are generally strong, but the devilishly clever, culturally hyper-attuned dialogue (by executive producer Josh Whedon, who wrote the original and worked on "Speed" and "Toy Story") is what makes this stand out. [10 Mar 1997, p.C8]
    • Chicago Tribune
  2. Entertaining, genre-bending. [16 Nov 2004, p.C1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  3. Far from taking anything away from the pulse-pounding show, thanks to Kiefer Sutherland’s magnetic performance, Bauer’s subtle psychological anguish may be the most interesting surprise of “24’s” new season.
  4. Although some may find this creation of David E. Kelley, the wizard behind "L.A. Law," too weird, I think it's wonderful. [18 Sept 1992, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  5. A smart, stylish police procedural very much in the manner of "CSI" and "Without a Trace." [28 Sept 2003, p.C10]
    • Chicago Tribune
  6. Undeclared is practically note-perfect. [25 Sept 2001, p.C1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  7. This is a "Masterpiece Theatre" of unexpected thrills, biting humor and pointed satire. [29 Mar 1991]
    • Chicago Tribune
  8. One of the finest of the new season series, this shimmeringly intelligent hospital drama returns Andre Braugher ("Homicide: Life on the Street") to series TV. Braugher plays, with typical depth and passion, Ben Gideon, a top cancer doc emotionally shaken after the loss of his wife. [10 Oct 2000, p.C8]
    • Chicago Tribune
  9. If Karen Sisco can keep its tart tone, heady pacing and scripts that continue to respect viewers' intelligence, there ought to be an audience for this. [1 Oct 2003, p.C5]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gripping.
    • Chicago Tribune
  10. All I can say, at this point, is that the first eight episodes of Season 7 are tight, unrelenting, complicated, fierce, wonderfully acted.
  11. It's affectionate and cute without being coy. In translating their own real-life experiences to the screen, the members of the creative team know that parenthood is filled with tensions and travail. But they are smart enough to allow the tenderness of the experience to shadow every encounter. [20 Aug 1990, p.C1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  12. Every scene teems with an enthralling, fully realized vision of life, the kind of jostling pageant of humanity in the most satisfying works of Dickens or Trollope.
  13. This is compelling in both the broad strokes and the little details. The funny thing is, even at its most absurd, it feels almost realistic, because Hurwitz so precisely sketches his characters and their setting. [1 Nov 2003, p.27]
    • Chicago Tribune
  14. It is shot in the seemingly off-handed manner of an independent film, and its concerns are with fending off boredom as the days drift by. It is invigoratingly easygoing. [10 Sept 1997, p.3]
    • Chicago Tribune
  15. One of the best things about “Weeds” is how efficiently it moves forward; it’s an incredibly well-paced half-hour that always leaves you wanting more. [13 Aug 2007]
    • Chicago Tribune
  16. Angel turns out to be as nimble, in its own way, as "Buffy" itself, and Boreanaz a revelation. It helps matters that Whedon has said his primary focus this year will be on the progeny, not the parent. [4 Oct 1999, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  17. Shandling adeptly bends the line between reality and TV's make-believe. [14 Aug 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
  18. To deny yourself the engrossing “Dexter” based on its subject matter would be to miss out on one of television’s most fiendishly intelligent new dramas.
  19. In the same way that "The Wire" showed there is an HBO way to update that staple of regular TV, the cop show, Deadwood demonstrates that the western can be revitalized, too, with a dose of extreme realism. [19 Mar 2004, p.C1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  20. Shandling is perfect in a role he created, skillfully balancing arrogance and insecurity; Torn, always exasperated, and Tambor, forever fawning, are spectacular foils in a show that is stunningly quick-witted. [2 Jun 1993]
    • Chicago Tribune
  21. What elevates "Mad About You" is that it twists the reality of marriage in the '90s with restraint and wit. It is not going for the big laughs, or those based on insults, but rather for laughs of recognition. In that, it succeeds quite well. And it doesn't hurt that the two stars are charmers. [23 Sep 1992]
    • Chicago Tribune
  22. It’s as addictive and absorbing, in its own way, as “The Wire.”
  23. For all their foibles, the Bluth family seems more real than most stale sitcom clans; the looks that they give each other are recognizable to anyone who has ever been embarrassed or just weirded out by the behavior of the people they love. [5 Nov 2004, p.5]
    • Chicago Tribune
  24. The instantly addictive series has something else most reality shows -- even the really good ones -- don't have: demonstrations of distinctive creativity. [7 Dec 2005]
    • Chicago Tribune
  25. A masterful meditation on the nature and meaning of forgiveness.
  26. "Curb" is as funny, in its pulling-teeth-with-a-pliers kind of way, as anything on TV. [13 Sep 2002]
    • Chicago Tribune
  27. The real accomplishment here is creator Bob Lowry's complex, thought-provoking insights into upper-middle-class highs and lows today. [5 Nov 2004, p.3]
    • Chicago Tribune
  28. Surprising doesn't begin to describe what happens.
  29. Though it has an almost flawless pilot, and one of the best casts of the season, how long will the writers be able to tease out the mysteries of those 52 hours without driving viewers mad?

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