Classic Rock Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 805 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Master of Puppets [Remastered & Expanded Edition]
Lowest review score: 20 What About Now
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 8 out of 805
805 music reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The lyrics are packed with so many trite clichés that you can’t help but wince, whether he’s wishing for world peace on Make Love Not War (which manages to make room for the Trump-supporting Love to thank the USA ‘and all the folks protecting us very day’), dredging up seafaring love metaphors on Too Cruel or fashioning sappy eco ballads like Only One Earth.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Expressive, feral, soulful, sensual, explosive… On Air? On fire, more like.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is a brilliant time-stamp of a band on the cusp of greatness. In this all-encompassing collection, Metallica have actually managed to improve on perfection.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The post-hardcore foundations are here, complete with drama-fuelled, singalong choruses, but what The Used have built upon them opens up a new world of creative opportunities for them.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A handful of tracks shoot for the anthemic uplift of vintage U2, but fall short. The only real left-field beauty here is Love Is All We Have Left, a token reminder of the Dublin quartet’s shimmering ambient avant-rock period.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Occasional bursts of fierce, psychotic guitar evoke the spirit of punk-rock alter ego, Rikki Nadir. Otherwise it’s voice and piano and very little else. The intimacy is at times so intense it’s almost frightening. It is, to borrow the title of a VdGG song, ’eavy mate. There are some clever subplots too, Hammill being at the very top of his lyrical game.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A handful of solo piano interludes also summon inescapable echoes of Spinal Tap’s Lick My Love Pump. Overall, though, Synthesis feels like a successful experiment.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Neither a work of nostalgia nor a move away from the blueprint that made them so special in the first place, this album demonstrates that artistic quality cannot be confined to a specific place in time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you compare this to past triumphs like Come My Fanatics and Dopethrone--albums that pushed doom metal into heavier and more joyously drug-addled territory than ever before--Wizard Bloody Wizard falls a spliff or two short of the mark.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Automatic impresses in its scope and daring. Certainly, the drone-like Drive was a surprise choice for first single and opening cut, as if R.E.M were wilfully avoiding the rock god game.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Originally rejected by Reprise Records executives as being nothing more than a bunch of demos, the entire set is spun with some strange, surreal and beautiful magic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    American Fall is their eleventh studio album since the band formed in 1996, and there’s no compromise, no backing down. The anger keeps churning, the hooks keep building. ... It’s sometimes reminiscent of Green Day, but none the worse for that.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Bootsy shines brightest when the Big Daddy Kanes pipe down and he gets to consider mortality on the poignant Heaven Yes, pay tribute to fallen P-Funk comrade Bernie Worrell on A Salute To Bernie, or stretch out on the uncut funk he does best, bolstered by guitarist Eric Gales and veteran Funkadelic drummer Dennis Chambers on Come Back Bootsy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s the ever-present hint of neurosis in Rivers Cuomo’s voice and vaguely bi-polar lyrics (thankfully not produced using the cut-up technique he employed for last year’s self-titled release) that give this band their perennial edge of strangeness, and reaffirm Weezer’s unique place in American rock fans’ affections.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When they play to their traditional strengths, most exhilaratingly on anthem-to-be Cryin’ In Your Beer and the breezy Caught By The Wind, they’re all walloping choruses and galloping guitars, but when they take chances things get really intriguing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s little variation in sound over the 11 tracks, but bucketloads of yearning, wistful emotion that is elegant and uplifting, with just a touch of schmaltz.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Thanks to Mark Lambert’s overly ostentatious and frequently intrusive production, Russell occasionally sounds lost within his own material.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Groovies are indeed back, still majestic, supernatural and magnificently defiant, and as a result the rock‘n’roll world feels back on its axis.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Manson’s nihilistic take on 2017 is interwoven with glimpses of personal darkness, wrapped up in mutually constrictive and damaging relationships on epic dirge Blood Honey and the closing Threats Of Romance, ordering a partner to do his murderous bidding on the Muse disco blues Kill4Me, and mourning the loss of his father on the seven-minute centrepiece Saturnalia. But even here there’s a renewed crackle to Manson’s attack--a viper regaining its bite.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The record is rivenwith angst, strife and remonstration. Which makes it sound like a knotty proposition. But actually it’s quite the opposite.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The song titles may be a little lacking this time round (although The Sordid Soliloquy Of Sawborg Destructo makes up for it), but The Blood of Gods is more of the same monstrous bilge.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This 1986 Morrissey-Marr career peak proves enduringly rich and rewarding in its punchy, remastered, expanded form.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All told, this is a finely detailed and lovingly curated tribute to one of the true greats.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The truth is that Carry Fire is about as good an album as we could reasonably expect from him in 2017.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hiring QOTSA producer Eric Valentine has given their bluesy bluster a hint of Josh Homme’s desert Bowie sleaze on tracks like Never Swim Alone, Statues, Caught Up and Moonlight. ... There’s still space for the weird bits, though.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lady Gaga adds majestic soul diva clout to Find Yourself, Nelson proves to be a sterling guitarist and the whole thing is hellacious, meaning good.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Independence Day is normal for Neil: he tests the climate and the atmospherics are depressing. Terrorise Me, a response to the Bataclan outrage, is the key piece. The rest is no faffing and easy listening.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Orc
    Thoroughly anti-social and wonderfully obnoxious throughout, this is kick-arse psych’n’roll as it should be.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Opener Up All Night moves through the formulaic pop gears as smoothly as Don Henley cruising along the Pacific Coast Highway, while Holding On is a slickly realised mid-tempo foot tapper. However, shorn of the novelty factor, such middle-of-the-road material remains better suited to balmy summer nights and drivetime radio than to repeated home listening.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seething with anxiety and frontman Jesse Lacey’s trademark sarcastic self‑flagellation, and with a gorgeous production that gives the music space to breathe, it’s an emotional, intelligent work of grace and beauty.