Country Weekly's Scores

  • Music
For 143 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Tuskegee
Lowest review score: 42 Spring Break... Checkin' Out
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 143
143 music reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As he moves beyond his rap boundaries into more country-rock fare, this album is a step forward for the Kid.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album plays like a tribute to an earlier era, rich with period atmosphere, and Gregg, as always, delivers an authenticity few white singers could muster.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Frankly, traditional-minded listeners will wonder if the whole crew shouldn't be committed, as this quirky affair-depending on your perspective--is either brilliant or crazy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Aside from bandmate Dan Tyminski's American-roots turns, there are fewer diversions this time from the restrained, often introspective fare Alison favors, including the regrettable omission of the stirring devotionals that have graced her past works.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She doesn't just alternately pay homage to country and jazz here; she elegantly blends the two.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With this vocal showcase, Ronnie may finally garner a long-overdue best male country vocalist award.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Overall, these songs are safe, inoffensive and respectable, but they simply don't quite scale the same musical heights of Dolly's former glories such as "Jolene" or "I Will Always Love You."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a formula sure to satisfy any fan--even Bruce.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Country Hits Bluegrass Style is mostly a rehash of Ricky's 2008 album for Cracker Barrel.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ranging from jazzy jaunts to breezy tropical confections and varied country and blues hues, the sometimes-scattered Ready for Confetti is a multicolored parade in which even the shovel-pusher walking behind the horses can find that hope happens, too.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Country die-hards are likely to favor something sturdier, but listeners who walk on the wilder side are sure to find a few kicks inside Little Red Boots.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Even if the whole affair is something of a lark, Norah's songbird stylings and The Willies' uncluttered arrangements send it skyward.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There's plenty of room on these 11 tracks for Kellie's steely determination to shine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Her recurring implication that this life may be all we have is a bold notion that may bring relief or dismay-and your response to that notion will tell you whether or not Hello Cruel World is an album you'll greet with open arms.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If that weren't the case, the well-rounded first installment of Remember Me would nonetheless serve as a modest but fitting memorial to a world-class artist, as well as a testament to Willie's enduring musical ties to Nashville.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While Snider has been more entertaining and melodically engaging on previous efforts, here he risks trying to get his head around the disturbing times in which we live and, just as importantly, to avoid clichéd responses.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    "Family" oozes with humility and domestic contentment, while the gentle, Nashville-leaning "Lucky That Way" (sung with Kenny Chesney on Crossroads) is a Walsh mini-biography
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Live in Japan-an album unreleased in the U.S. until now-shows the entertainer in good form, doing a lightweight, crowd-pleasing set especially indicative of the dead-center-mainstream approach that had cemented his fame.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Hank's been bruised but not broken, and Old School's aggressive attitude evidences that he still rules, with or without reinforcements, on his particular piece of the playground.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This album brings together a diverse lineup of artists for a collection that promotes the message that God has more to do with love than religion.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    While some of the project’s dozen tracks, like the beautiful ballad “Do You Remember” and the refreshingly ’70s-sounding “Lay Low,” which calls to mind Gary Stewart, are of Blake’s caliber, others feel rushed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Younger listeners will get the most out of this sometimes-inspired, retro-leaning smorgasbord; the more observant among them may even discern that Wanda's "bad girl" '50s persona, unlike today's blunt and blush-worthy equivalent, is nothing more than an act.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's nothing wild or organic about this overly calculated debut.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Kenny's sincere vocal delivery and the lyric content of each track are promising--but together, they register barely above maudlin, thanks to an overabundance of puttering tempos and downtrodden story lines.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Much of the rest of the album features ho-hum mid-tempos and ballads that don’t move the meter much in either direction.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    The tunes are infused with banjos, B3s and other instruments without sounding cluttered. It’s nicely done, but you would hope for better material.