Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,542 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Last of Us
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,542 game reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    More diversion than challenge, and never leads to stress. [Aug 2009, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Just Cause 2 can hardly be called an average game. It's a good one undermined by a selection of mediocre elements, and it's all the more frustrating this time around because Avalanche shows us glimpses of just how much fun two weeks on holiday with Rico should be. [Apr 2010, p.96]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Just Cause 2 can hardly be called an average game. It's a good one undermined by a selection of mediocre elements, and it's all the more frustrating this time around because Avalanche shows us glimpses of just how much fun two weeks on holiday with Rico should be. [Apr 2010, p.96]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Just Cause 2 can hardly be called an average game. It's a good one undermined by a selection of mediocre elements, and it's all the more frustrating this time around because Avalanche shows us glimpses of just how much fun two weeks on holiday with Rico should be. [Apr 2010, p.96]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The enticing depths of strategy coupled with the affectionate, colourful realisation of the various characters you control ignites curiosity - and their abilities in battle are well-realised, gratifyingly powerful and many. [June 2009, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tropico is as vibrant and capricious as the setting, and never dry or formulaic in the way that other management games can tend to be. [Christmas 2009, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Under the topsoil its functions are often ingenious, improving genre weaknesses with more success than its over-familiar form might suggest. [Nov 2009, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fun fan fodder, but hardly revelatory. [Christmas 2009, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unite doesn’t offer the kind of transformation at its higher levels that you might expect – the essential purpose is the same throughout: kill monsters, craft new shin pads out of dino-bladders, and swap your pig’s wings for a magician’s hat. Nonetheless, these simple motivations give way to a huge depth of execution which empowers and requires four players.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For beginners and intermediate level players, Oratorio Tangram presents an unmatched experience, a bright and energetic burst of fantasy combat, still quite unlike anything else in videogames.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    After the first game, the series was in need of a rethink; now all it needs is refinement. [May 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The amount of material here, familiar though some of it is, and the consummate presentation means that this is the most exhaustive Katamari to date, if not the finest. [Nov 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Robotic and methodical, and firmly in second place. [Dec 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Guitar Hero 5 does stand as the most accessible version of the game concept to date, presenting a significantly tidier, more intuitive menu to get you playing sooner. [Nov 2009, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mini Ninjas offers an assortment of simple pleasures and its tooth-rottingly sweet presentation wholly endears – but it isn’t sustained, and in places falls disastrously below the watermark.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Proportionally, far more casual players will finish this than ever finished Super Metroid or Contra III, and their enjoyment might even compare. Sat nobly between emulated coin-ops and overpriced turkeys on high street shelves, Shadow Complex is something of a Live Arcade landmark.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The original title won fans for its shocks and surprises; the second takes no risks. While its ultraviolence is slick and satisfying, its shtick has calcified. [Apr 2010, p.92]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When you're playing a Ninja Gaiden game and not dying until the eighth chapter, it doesn't bode well for the future of the series as we know it. Oh, and the camera's still rubbish. [Nov 2009, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's accomplished in its execution, but threatens to segregate the platform just as Harmonix seemed to be opening it up to all-comers. [Nov 2009, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Stray from the beaten track and Crystal Bearers is a different game...That it is so oddly buried is inexplicable, but you can't deny the fun of excavation. [Feb 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    ArmA 2 isn’t just dogmatic and unforgiving – it’s also very awkward in its construction and the weight of its ambition frequently proves too much for the sometimes-brilliant main campaign to pull off. Nonetheless, its vast, detailed world and unapologetic dynamism turn the game from sandbox to snowglobe – something you can’t resist shaking up just to see how it looks.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Granted, this is hardly the most drastic of sequels, but it didn’t need to be: instead, it stands as an indicator that, even as the DSi heads ever deeper into the online space, on some level at least, it’s still business as usual.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Heavy Rain pulls off its branching narrative by donning blinkers and sprinting down the chosen routes. Countless permutations of each scene are allowed, safe in the knowledge that they will never be addressed again.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The puzzles themselves can feel gimmicky and detached, as though inclusion was more important than integration. [Dec 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A charming jaunt. [Sept 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A rare bit of vindication for Nintendo's oft-misused service. [Sept 2009, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A simple, finely tuned and comprehensive shooter that only rarely wobbles. [Sept 2009, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ingenious, experimental and entirely polarising, games like ColorZ show that WiiWare continues to take the road less travelled. In doing so, the platform’s most poignant offerings reveal something a little bit magical - a fleeting glimpse of the soul lurking within the machine.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While you won't necessarily win without some loyal subjects from your friends list, there's a deceptive amount of fun you can have while trying. [Oct 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It manages to be that rarest of things: a Wii game that you've just got to try online. [May 2010, p.98]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    No other game catches the exhilaration of mental exercises, while doing just enough to smooth over their occasional frustrations, in quite the same way as Layton. [Nov 2009, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It delivers on 5th Cell's unlikely conceit far more capably than expected, and fulfills a blueprint so bizarrely ambitious almost nobody believed it was possible. [Nov 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It refreshes with its purity of purpose and ambition, even if, as a mechanising of the grieving process, it’s a game few will wish to return to once completed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It refreshes with its purity of purpose and ambition, even if, as a mechanising of the grieving process, it’s a game few will wish to return to once completed.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While refinement might be the best way to make a good game better, it certainly isn't the best way to justify the cost of a second sequel in as many years. [June 2010, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite the lack of ingenuity on display, NSMB Wii's thrash of four players does bring uproarious anarchy to the sofa for short periods of time. [Dec 2009, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Runic Games has created something bright and punchy, if a touch aimless, which makes up for the lack of personality (and multiplayer) with a beaming smile and lots of encouraging pats on the back. [Feb 2010, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A stern, if unspectacular, challenge. [Jan 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a game with ambitions that now outstrip the confines of an atrophying engine, but beneath the exterior lies a world rich in atmosphere - the credible and pervading horror of a landscape drawn with unusual finesse. [Mar 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The sport's on-track jousting is potentially some of the fastest and most exhilarating source material around, but by default developers appear to struggle to present it in anything other than a dry and overly technical fashion. [Jan 2010, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's easy to assume that Gyromancer is a clone of Puzzle Quest...The truth, perhaps, is that it's simply an improvement on the formula. [Jan 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's easy to assume that Gyromancer is a clone of Puzzle Quest...The truth, perhaps, is that it's simply an improvement on the formula. [Jan 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s still a classic, then, but one you’d be wise to play in brief installments. And with no real plot to lose yourself in, no breadcrumbs to follow, and very little else to bother yourself with besides headshots, perhaps this is Serious Sam as he’s always meant to be encountered – as a palate-cleansing blast of pure four-colour chaos to enjoy between other courses.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tight ink limitations force creative solutions, but once learnt, certain tricks undermine the action. [Feb 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When you do surrender to Echoshift's world of relaxation, time management, and jarring cruelty, however, time - like your many lives - files by. [May 2010, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The premise may be wild-eyed, but the systems that fire it are robust... Deserves the small but vociferous following it will no doubt find. [Apr 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Compared to its Wii counterpart - as generic a movie-licensed collect 'em up as you'll see - the DS version is swollen with ideas. [Apr 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Our concern is that the game doesn't quite have the depth to sustain interest over a period of months, and an apparent uninterest in providing anything other than straight combat will compound the problem. And yet, at US$9.99, Plain Sight boasts a price that's as minimalist as its visual style. As such, a game this novel can only be a tempting prospect.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The battles, meanwhile, are engaging despite their simplicity, and it's beautiful to watch each turn play out. [May 2010, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game, though, is the same enjoyable knockabout romp that it ever was, and Gameloft has thankfully made no attempt to shoehorn touch-screen controls in unnecessarily. If you feel a burning urge to spend 500 points to relive some small part of your lost youth, you won't be disappointed.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    APB has to learn how to play its obvious trump card, a brilliant customisation suite. With tools that give you power over every aspect of your persona – cars, clothes, tattoos, shape, logos, victory jingles and even the tunes pumped out of your stereo – the game really gets that people are the brands of the 21st century.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s not even surprising,? ?despite all? ?this,? ?that Resident Evil? ?5? ?is a good game.? The surprising,? ?and sad,? ?thing about? ?Resident Evil? ?5? ?is that it feels old.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Resident Evil 5 is a good game. The surprising, and sad, thing about Resident Evil 5 is that it feels old. [Apr 2009, p.112]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What it does have is bundles of charm, a gorgeous art style, and enough bite-sized chunks to last many a journey. [July 2010, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Light Trax continues to zip along the fine line between puzzler and racer neatly. [Aug 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game's frustrations are notable, but never spoil the appeal of controlling that indefatigable little guy. [July 2010, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hits more than it misses. [Sept 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Exquisitely presented. [Sept 2010, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When it clicks, though, you'll find yourself in the middle of a thoughtful and intricate puzzle game, in which you feel more like an electrical engineer than the magic builder or celestial removal man most match-three titles cast you as.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whatever its bias or excisions, MOH rejects the sort of gung-ho globetrotting baloney seen in Modern Warfare, and makes an honest attempt not to trivialise the lives of US soldiers, creating an air of sober authenticity which is unusual among shooters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is a game that may not leave you full, but it'll taste pretty sweet while it lasts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is a game that may not leave you full, but it'll taste pretty sweet while it lasts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    But this is a production that feels increasingly aged in the face of modern game design. The creeping and eventually overriding feeling is that this meticulously precise simulation, and its lovingly constructed catalogue of automotive history, deserved a little more game to come along for the ride.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game's intended target audience is likely to respond to the beautifully animated pets with squeaks of delight, though exposure to the Edge test family did result in two children vying for the attention of a camera that would one accept one of the little terrors at a time. [Christmas 2010]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is Dungeon Keeper by way of Viva Pinata - building a devilish defence against do-gooders by massaging a delicate and extremely elaborate ecosystem. [Christmas 2010]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Retro Studios has done a fine job with the Donkey Kong Country concept, ably translating its appeal for a modern platform, but it doesn't push it much further. [Christmas 2010, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In terms of quest interaction, there's simply not a great deal going on. Fable III largely gets away with it through sheer charm, and the infectious sense of fun in its detail. [Christmas 2010, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's a genuine sense of storybook adventure to proceedings, which a limited budget and uninspired enemies can't quite erode. [Christmas 2010, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mediatonic's experimental blend of tower defence, scrolling shooter and invincibility doesn't always gel, but approached as a survival score-attack in the vein of Canabalt, Who's That Flying?! becomes an uncommonly moreish Mini.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It never hits Neversoft's golden-age standard, but it comes much closer than such a daft premise would lead you to suspect. [Dec 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Puzzle hunting is the only hassle in an otherwise laidback world. This niggle aside, Professor Layton remains a fine antidote to dull Sunday afternoons. [Dec 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Plenty of games can be as awkward or frustrating as Dead Rising 2, but none are as insanely, violently, engagingly bonkers. [Nov 2010, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The beauty of Deadly Premonition is that it's a straightforward whodunnit viewed through the cracked prism of an unreliable narrator, conjuring an atmosphere of suspicion and confusion throughout. [Dec 2010, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In taking away direct control Miniland Mayhem has intensified the appeal to players' protective instinct which exists at the heart of the series. [Jan 2011, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Epic Mickey may not always be entirely satisfying to play, but it's still enormously interesting to wander around with an eye open for the detailing. [Jan 2011, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels more like a yearly update than a sequel, a new campaign with old multiplayer. The game isn't distinct from its predecessors in any important way, and fatigue sets in quicker than before. [Jan 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels more like a yearly update than a sequel, a new campaign with old multiplayer. The game isn't distinct from its predecessors in any important way, and fatigue sets in quicker than before. [Jan 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels more like a yearly update than a sequel, a new campaign with old multiplayer. The game isn't distinct from its predecessors in any important way, and fatigue sets in quicker than before. [Jan 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's engaging and, if the controls can be forgiven, a satisfying sampler of RTS thrills for the uninitiated. [Feb 2011, p.100]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Previous instalments in this technically strong but creatively lacking series have been one-note, papering over a lack of originality with a hefty dose of shock and awe. Killzone 3, by contrast, attempts to wage a more varied war. It succeeds, just, by offering a tour of locations both more visually interesting and diverse than its forebears, but it all still depends heavily on the brutal impact of the shooting at its core.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a game you'll complete, chuckle at and show off. [Sept 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Uprising may not break any new ground in a genre that is arguably an endangered species, but it does a good job of breathing life into the dying breed. It's a reminder that an artist's eye, when met by a designer's understanding of modern tastes, can revitalise a struggling brand and make the old feel new again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Uprising may not break any new ground in a genre that is arguably an endangered species, but it does a good job of breathing life into the dying breed. It's a reminder that an artist's eye, when met by a designer's understanding of modern tastes, can revitalise a struggling brand and make the old feel new again.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's a great deal of satisfaction in finding the right combination of fighters and feeling the curve of a battle until you hit the tagging sweet spot. [Mar 2011, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Magicka delivers splashy nonsense of a gleeful kind, and somehow its delight in chaos and willful stupidity buoys it some way above its faults. [Mar 2011, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A short, budget shot of old-school gaming. [Sept 2010, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The 3rd Birthday remains a strong proposition, marrying eastern and western design sensibilities to produce a strong and relevant update to a latent, outmoded series. [Apr 2011, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yakuza 4 is ultimately too set in its ways to welcome anyone new to the family, and too laden with cutscenes to let its nuances. [Apr 2011, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You can take the massively multiplayer game out of the PC, then, but perhaps not the PC out of the game. The endless beta testing, the freewheeling project management, and the agonies and ecstasies of the results. [Apr 2011, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Nintendogs + Cats is a near match for the DS original. Were it not for the visual pampering it would be entirely possible to replace the old game with the new without the kids noticing. [Apr 2011, p.91]
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Nintendogs + Cats is a near match for the DS original. Were it not for the visual pampering it would be entirely possible to replace the old game with the new without the kids noticing. [Apr 2011, p.91]
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Nintendogs + Cats is a near match for the DS original. Were it not for the visual pampering it would be entirely possible to replace the old game with the new without the kids noticing. [Apr 2011, p.91]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game starts slow, a feeling exacerbated - or perhaps caused - by the easiness of the battles. But you'll play it and play it. Every time you try to stop you're just one battle away from mastering that skill, for earning that new job. [Dec 2003, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yes, we've been here before, but Puzzle Fighter is one of the handful of Tetris clones that at least lies in the same league as Pajitnov's masterwork. [May 2003, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Made in Wario confidently sticks two fingers up at an industry that seems to have lost its sense of humour … it displays a refreshing intertextuality that manages to poke fun at and celebrate videogames. [June 2003, p. 103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is not a conventional pinball game with well-designed skillshots and a challenging layout, but since when was Pokemon ever conventional? [Nov 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mario Vs Donkey Kong may not be easy on the eye, but it's delightful to behold the system of checks and balances, rules and relationships at work here, some of the rooted in deep Mario lore. [Aug 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Over-levelling all too easily threatens to undermine Fire Emblem's unique place in the genre. It's a problem easily side-stepped by both choosing an appropriate difficulty level and tempering your levelling, but nevertheless the option is unwelcome. [Aug 2005, p.90]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Stripped by necessity to its basest form to allow for the limited inputs of the handheld, and this time greatly enhanced and personlaised by character artist Gez Fry's gorgeous anime-inspired designs, Rebelstar may be their most accessible title to date. [Dec 2005, p.112]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a peculiar idea to grasp, but it's impossible to argue with how successfully Game Freak has taken one simple design decision and made it integral to movement, combat and puzzle solving. [Mar 2006, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine