Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,924 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Bloodborne
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2924 game reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Offering the quiet contemplation of a puzzle mode, the soothing time-wasting of a marathon session, or the frenetic rivalry of multiplayer: this has it all. [July 2007, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the familiarity, the longer you spend in your scaled-down village, the more you’re soothed into a gentle, constructive daydream which is every bit as charming as in all its other incarnations. [Jan 2005, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is still a fine – and visually opulent – auto-runner, but it’s bloated, too; a little restraint would have gone a long way.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a remarkable sequel, one that takes its predecessor not as a template, but a jumping-off point. And for all the justifiable concern about its chosen business model, its implementation of the free-to-play model prizes players’ hearts above the contents of their wallets.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the best entry in its genre since Bayonetta, and might just be the best game Ninja Theory has made to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Puzzle hunting is the only hassle in an otherwise laidback world. This niggle aside, Professor Layton remains a fine antidote to dull Sunday afternoons. [Dec 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brimming with self-assuredness both in its characterisations and its functionality, and measures its pace and progression with an ever more aggressively beautiful interface and environment design, capturing even more galactic and universal scale than the original. [Sept 2005, p.88]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The seamless integration of voice commands into a polished, thoughtful upgrade is Harmonix's slick finishing move. Dance Central 2 is a typical music game sequel – it works better, offers more, yet feels fundamentally the same – but it's a practised improvement to an already eye-catching routine.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plagued by imbalance, the Round 3 career can serve up over 50 bouts before one goes the distance. The new stun punch – a thunderclap of a haymaker – helps to ensure first to third round knockouts for the vast majority of fights. [Apr 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Amplitude is actually the perfect sequel. Not an expansion pack; a game that doesn't set out to mimic its forefather, but seeks to change the rules slightly without wholly perverting the initial concept. [June 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a game built from great art and clever mechanics, but it's an adventure born of both deeds and words.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every single moment of Four Swords is magically familiar and every single moment is dazzlingly fresh...Whether being experienced in the competitive, co-operative cackle of multiplay, or the captivating atmosphere of singleplayer, the extraordinary virtues of the game itself remain the same. [May 2004, p.96]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game's frustrations are notable, but never spoil the appeal of controlling that indefatigable little guy. [July 2010, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The plot is revealed in awkward clumps which never quite dovetail. There's no question, however, that Namco has managed to twist out a tale that sustains your interest across both discs. [Oct 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is a stupefyingly linear experience. While the individual stand-offs and shoot-outs are exhilirating, the removal of any sense of choice or any requirement of tactical thought makes this more of a theme park ride than a military operation. [Christmas 2003, p.117]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When so many games are trying to defend their value by cramming every mode and style into one unpalatable mix, it's refreshing to play something that's conceived with such vibrant, capricious clarity. [May 2004, p.104]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For those who favour Vice City above all else from GTA's back catalogue, it's the perfect 80's revival: a chance to live in the past, and love it. [Christmas 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Diablo still contains enough impulsive monster-slaying to entertain, but the trek from its home on PC has left it diminished.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For dedicated Ghosts GRAW 2 is a no-brainer. For the rest of us it's just the exact game "Advanced Warfighter" should have been and would have beeen if the clock wasn't watching; Ubisoft rewriting history and charging us twice for the privilege. [May 2007, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a resourceful little game, then, mining laudable variety from an economy of ideas. It's amusing, too, littering its backgrounds with visual gags, including a sly reference to Angry Birds - even if one cake-related joke proves a meme too far. And it saves the best for last, with a final level that offers some thrillingly silly catharsis, managing to one-up its most obvious inspiration in the process.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A surprisingly conservative game from Rockstar. Its absorption of cover mechanics makes Payne feel more familiar than he should, but even then his signature tricks are over a decade old. This is a game about a world-weary killer doing the only thing he knows how to, and for all its spectacular action beats there's something apt about Max's fatigue.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The strongest MMO launch for a long while, and the genre’s deftest ever take on PVP – but its appeal may yet prove too narrow. [Christmas 2008, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While it's unlikely to win as many hearts as Resident Evil 4 did, it's an equally important and remarkable entry in the series' tumultuous timeline. [March 2017, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a gentle refinement, ironing out kinks, sewing on a few accouterments, and leaving everything else the way it was. [Christmas 2015, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The same game you've been playing for seven years - or perhaps even longer. And for that it's a thorough success. [Mar 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All things considered, it’s about the best game called ‘DJ Hero’ we were ever likely to see. It deserves extended play.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a shame that Forza's much-vaunted AI tech proves an ill fit for open-world racing. [Dec 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Missions are wonderfully compact and briskly-paced, sweeping you though a substantial campaign with style to match. [Feb 2016, p.119]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the twitchy combat and compulsive collecting, it all comes back to those creaking mansions. Highly polished under their grime and cobwebs, the treats awaiting in their dark rooms prove Luigi’s subversive series still has the capacity to thrill.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a system that very naturally sets up some excellent multiplayer modes, and this is one of an elite few that can truly even the odds between players at different difficulty levels.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It isn’t any kind of reinvention, but a revitalisation, with a style so rich that it becomes an integral part of the game’s substance; Psychonauts breathes imagination and individuality as effortlessly as most games steal from one another. [July 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It uses preexisting flaws as the foundations for something that is better in just about every single way: bigger, more coherent and, best of all, immeasurably more generous. With that comes, appropriately, a puzzle for Bungie to solve. How do you continue to build on a game that has so few chinks in its lustrous, gleaming exotic armour? [Dec 2015, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Heroes of the Storm's great success is that it works harder than any other game to date to open up the strengths of this genre. [Aug 2015, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those expecting a tale on par with Atlus’ remarkable RPG may be disappointed, then, but Persona 4 Arena’s thoughtfully designed combat system has been well worth the wait.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Its keen sense of drama is as authentic as it is exhilarating: arcing a 40-yard free-kick around the wall and into the top corner in the last-minute of a cup final is as thrilling a moment as you'll witness in any FIFA match. It's hardly the beautiful game – its visuals are perfunctory at best – but Simon Read's creation smartly captures the capitalism, the artistry and the sheer, glorious unpredictability of its subject.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a sequel, it's not so much an extension as a remix, but one so capable and confident that 'remix' could very well be one of Clover Studio's own personal VFX powers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even completing a stage in the relatively tame classic Mini Cooper S will leave you feeling bothered and fatigued. [Feb 2016, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A short, budget shot of old-school gaming. [Sept 2010, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This convincing comeback has been designed for the die-hards - and they haven't been this well served by a Sonic game for ages. [Issue#311, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It gets far more laughs than it should, and special mention to its credits song: perhaps the finest ending on the App Store. Original, funny, and intense: for a game based on Snake, not bad at all.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Quarrel DX is the funniest and most stylish word game around, with layers of strategy that go down so deep it sometimes feels you're just scratching the surface. Even without multiplayer this is an essential purchase. With multiplayer, it could take over the world – or, at the very least, be the thinking person's Angry Birds.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Monster Hunter still offers some of the most exciting and handsomely staged third-person combat you'll find in any game - and, if only by a small amount, Generations has raised the bar again. [Issue#296, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Full of bravado, packed with features and brimming with invention, this 20-year-old veteran is as vital and relevant as ever. [Jan 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its flaws stand out in the short singleplayer campaign, and its tail end relies too much on the gunplay that the game otherwise relegates to a begrudging last resort. But when it hits its stride, the environments unlock the player’s tactical ambitions in away that is truly empowering, launching you between shadow and light, discretion and aggression.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not every layer of Talos finds its mark, but the discourse created by navigating them is a brain-taxing process to match the genre's greats. [Feb 2015, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s uncompromising and involved and may not be for everyone, but you sense it’s the game Bizarre have been meaning to make for the last seven years, and for that alone, it’s precious. [Nov 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The singleplayer adventure is yet another sprawling, puzzle-heavy artefact hunt which, truth be told, is far bigger than we had any right to expect. [May 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    And though a clutch of score-based challenges are both too few and too brisk, they contribute to an iOS game of rare generosity and substance.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Its ragged edges mean it feels more like a competent cover version that occasionally strays off key, rather than the genuine article. [Dec 2017, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Level-5 and Studio Ghibli's contributions are harmonious. As a game, Ni No Kuni builds upon classic JRPG foundations, eschewing the evolutions of Xenoblade Chronicles and Final Fantasy XII. But the assured flair with which Level-5 has implemented each of the game's classic components combines with Ghibli's masterful storytelling to deliver a JRPG that's quite unlike any other.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Is 2010 about the show or the sport? It is, like the UFC itself, ready to be both. This confidence is what makes it such a complete and compelling package – a great MMA sim, a near flawless UFC sim. In a year, it’s made the kind of studious jump that took FIFA almost ten.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is easily the better sequel, a firm improvement on "Warrior Within." So why the long face? For the simple and saddest reason of all: ennui. [Christmas 2005, p.100]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ready At Dawn has successfully maintained its focus, making its debut game a standout title on a platform lacking in must-haves. [May 2006, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most ambitious game BioWare has ever made. [Jan 2014, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On its own terms, Tales from the Borderlands is one of Telltale's best works yet. [Christmas 2015, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An ambitious and largely successful attempt to meld the accuracy of traditional firstperson battling with the extra spatial agility and awareness afforded by thirdperson movement. It does feel slightly overdone, but not to the point of obscuring its offering of intensity and flighty action. [May 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The 3DS' first fighting game happens to be a version of one of the genre's best, and it's lost little in the conversion to a portable system. Token additions, such as the cute-but-unworkable Dynamic (3D) View, bulk out the package, but it's what's stayed the same that's the real triumph here. SSFIV is just as vibrant, fluid and confident as ever – and it's just been unshackled from your TV.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the few games of its type you can actually play for an hour, take on one of its missions, and have a meaningful unit of experience. Staight in. Straight out. Gamer satisfied. [Sept 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bright and breezy, it offers almost bottomless value, creates a believable and consistent world, offers a real strategic challenge as well as the kind of brainless completism that’s best suited to delayed trains and rainy afternoons, and hides a staggeringly intricate set of mechanics inside an accessible and non-threatening world. [July 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As the more intimate title suggests, this may be as much about Croft's brand awareness in the face of unprecedented (and Uncharted) competition. [Oct 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The extreme volatility of every moment carries a reward that overshadows the annoyances. [June 2005, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the Clancy series entirely consists of such well-rounded packages, it’s Splinter Cell that shines – a game of equally accomplished halves. [Dec 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game that skilfully blends the safe with the courageous in an alchemical fusion of old and new, somehow brave and default all at once.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Doom's shimmering, bombastic combat is as absorbing as it is revelatory. [Aug 2016, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if its technical handicaps are clear, what it achieves with the palette at its disposal is astounding. Instincts' lower resolution textures, sporadic pop-up, cruder characters and jagged shadows are all clearly defined beneath its baking sun, but the composition of the overall canvas offers a masterful distraction. [Nov 2005, p.100]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Relic seems afraid to let any of its ideas meaningfully vary your experience, in case the result isn’t as satisfying as the scenario it has clearly tested so well. [Apr 2009, p.119]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's easy to forget just how precious few of the genre's many exponents ever attain this level of competence, of course, but that said it's not unreasonable to have hoped for a little more innovation from Capcom. [July 2004, p.103]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though the explosions scale with progress, and the act of detonation continues to be a giddy pleasure, Mars could do with a thicker atmosphere.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The best Metroid game in years. [Dec 2017, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Over-familiarity and stagnation has bred a cancerous apathy among gaming's cognoscenti. FFX-2, like it or not, gives players a reason to take notice again. [Jan 2004, p.98]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What's most frustrating about Tiberium Wars is that it chooses not to accentuate the breakneck battlefield thrills of C&C's arcade stylings, opting instead to preserve the old blueprint. [May 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What it does have is something an Activision or EA would kill for: a game built up around one good idea that drew in a community of unprecedented size. And that counts for a lot against PUBG's flaws: its rough-edged movement, animations, collision detection, character customisation, spectator functionality, and presentation. Perhaps you might hear all that and think this isn't worth your time. To do so would be to miss out on an absolute, and absolutely deserving, phenomenon. [March 2018, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A masterclass in imaginative flair and precision-engineered game mechanics. The GBA is beginning to feel all grown up. [Feb 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a puzzle game and a strategy game as much as an action game, then, and like Rockstar's Manhunt, it will sicken you even as it provides its murky thrills.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Perhaps its greatest achievement is defying comparisons to Rock Band and emerging as its own game. GHWT might be a little rough around the edges, but it’s a good stab at reinvigorating the franchise. [Christmas 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As smooth and exhilarating a ride as it ever was… MotoGP 3 remains a strong, solid outing for those who enjoy a thoroughly analogue play experience as well as fans of motorbike racing. [Oct 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Rocket League often feels like a sports game for people who don't really like sports games, that's no criticism. [Oct 2015, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With it’s limited range of costumes (broadened with lazy palette swaps) and unambitious Tag and Team battles, DOA4 remains as familiar as the mild disappointment it delivers. [Feb 2006, p.84]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s one of the happiest pieces of software ever released, constantly throwing tunes, trinkets and new tricks at the player simply to amuse them. [Jan 2009, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a tale of swords and souls in which everyone keeps their dignity until you knock off their cuirass and make them fight in their bra. [Sept 2008, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [An] endearingly odd, memorable little game. [Issue#314, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's not so much a game with depth as one with width, a fat pool of possible ways to idle away your time between quests, allowing you to craft what feels like an unprecedented sense of social personality, in terms of colour and grandeur if not actual complexity. [Nov 2004, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Previous Forza entries showed glimmers of personality, hinting at a broader approach to accessibility, but were too shy and reserved to truly let loose. Horizon boldly goes there. It's a magpie game, assembled from pieces of other series, but it delivers a driving game precision engineered to offer all levels of player the best possible experience.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an incredible achievement, the closest a simulator has come to entertainment; the nearest videogaming has come to the real experience of driving. Forget play. Just drive. [March 2005, p.84]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As efficiently and proficiently designed as Logan’s Shadow is, it’s unavoidably tied to the problems associated with action games of this type on PSP. [Feb 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s a great shame, because with tighter controls Frogmind’s charismatic debut would be a memorable one, but as it is it lacks the power to draw you back into its world.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's scrappy, sure, but no racer offers such a breadth of choice, or seems so willing to let the player set the rules of the road. When Project Cars 2 gets into gear, there's little else like it. [Dec 2017, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Over-levelling all too easily threatens to undermine Fire Emblem's unique place in the genre. It's a problem easily side-stepped by both choosing an appropriate difficulty level and tempering your levelling, but nevertheless the option is unwelcome. [Aug 2005, p.90]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As an experiment in making a genuine retro game, and as a tribute to a forgotten title of yore, Forget-Me-Not is brilliant. But as a 2011 release, even with rose-tinted spectacles firmly applied, it's much harder to recommend.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Irritations never last long in Smash 3DS, sandblasted away by the winningly varied combat and the sheer torrent of ways to enjoy it. [Dec 2014, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Treyarch has taken just enough from COD4 to make World At War a broad success, but it remains firmly in its shadow. [Christmas 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Levels feel more segmented and less regimented, and the better for it. There’s no cheap, wholesale reduction of difficulty, just what feels like a more balanced play experience. [Jan 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The fifth Tony Hawk's title doesn't just suffer because of its embarrassing attempts to be edgy and urban, it's poorer because it lacks the verve and imagination so prevalent in previous iterations. [Christmas 2003, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As the studio name suggests, this is a game design team that's in love with books, and so it's amongst books that its first offering reveals its true potential.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A love letter to the NES era, Shovel Knight is punishingly difficult, a game of quick reflexes and exacting precision. [Sept 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its ideas cohere into a blaze of brilliant white heat while it burns itself out. [Feb 2017, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s almost shocking how seamless, engrossing and accessible Fahrenheit is. It’s sad, then, that it shows weakness in the one area where it needed to be stronger than any other game: the script. [Oct 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is easily the better sequel, a firm improvement on "Warrior Within." So why the long face? For the simple and saddest reason of all: ennui. [Christmas 2005, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But the puzzles themselves are nearly an unmitigated joy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The fundamentals of the game are intoxicating.

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