Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,596 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Grand Theft Auto V
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,596 game reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Mission design feels particularly lazy this time round, Locomotive seemingly jotting down amusing cutscene scenarios before finding tenuous ways of tying ‘destroy this’ or ‘abduct that’ tasks to the constant stream of ooh-er references to ‘big willies’ and ‘meat’ in the dialogue. [May 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Where B-Boy crucially disappoints is in the execution of its gameplay. The turn-based nature of its stages is interminably frustrating. [Oct 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Given that its bland combat is little enhanced by the ability to create cover, you suspect that the promises made for the technology have simply dug its own grave. [Dec 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    At its best, Orgarhythm's disparate ingredients coalesce into scenes of thrilling tribal warfare, a winningly eclectic soundtrack stirring your men to march into battle. Too often, however, you end up feeling like your fragmented cabal: disorientated, frustrated and battered into submission by an unforgiving enemy, with little reason to keep on fighting.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that’s both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a solid concept, but Honeyslug struggles to develop it in any meaningful way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The plot may be filled with sub-Lynchian fumbles, but it weaves an intriguing story, while the charismatic muddle of awards that accompanies each solution goes some way to wiping away the grey memory of what you're actually being congratulated for.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    If the Old West is anything, it's a giant myth, and one that the Call Of Juarez games have always embodied. What The Cartel replaces this with – a mishmash of 
The Shield and conspiracy theories – is a much less substantial vision, played out within a world with no real resonance to it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a game that makes you desperately want to feel like a Jedi, arcing your lightsaber across the screen, ducking under attacks, parrying counters and going in for the kill, but the subtlety just isn’t there. [July 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's in need of plenty more flair, not so much that it strains against what its buttoned-down framework is trying to achieve, but just to inject some feeling of variety into its skirmishes and sorties. [Sept 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    What it didn't factor into the design is that kleptomaniacs rarely bother collecting items without emotional gravitas, and this oversight becomes immediately obvious when you compare Rumble to its source material. [Jan 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Soldier of Fortune’s damage model is probably its major selling point and, lamentably, the only thing that makes its combat entertaining. [Feb 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a title trying hard to inject personality into the genre, the experience feels irreparably mechanical. There's plenty of variety in terms of racing categories and machinery, but the overall lack of involvement is inexcusable. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Moops isn't a bad idea for a iOS title, then, but it's extremely poorly implemented. For a game about bug hunting, it's failed to catch enough of its own.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Yes, Beat Down revives the warped charisma of Capcom’s beat’em up heyday, but that’s the only area where it actually triumphs. [Oct 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Playing it instils a completely neutral response, as though it were no more than a means of absorbing time. [Jan 2008, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even with just an additional pair of buttons for camera movement, a broad switch of irritations could have been avoided, but as it is, Death Jr is recommended only for forgiving platformer enthusiasts. [Nov 2005, p.113]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Cheap bosses and stingy save points ensure that it's a drag as well as a bore, while a handful of crash bugs do very little to improve proceedings. My Little Hero's greatest charm is its air of sweet innocence, perhaps, but in truth this adventure is primitive rather than childlike.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Bad Day LA is the game people often say they want and then ignore when it arrives; it prizes ambition over execution and flair over finesse and both pays the price and reaps the rewards for daring to do so. [Sept 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The last thing on Glory Days’ mind is fun: it instead angrily stomps forward to the beat of the ‘war is hell’ drum. [Oct 2007, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You can see things worth admiring here. The promise of sandbox combat emerging from the interplay between environment and gun-modes never comes good, instead devolving into a repetitive, gruelling bedlam - but that promise alone is more than many shooters offer. To make anything of it, however, Hard Reset would need to go right back to the drawing board.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Blacksite is a thoroughly unexceptional title for which unrealistic promises were made, and one that is further let down by a wide assortment of bugs and design issues. [Jan 2008, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Voyeurs will be disappointed, since the sex portrayed is the very model of conventionality. The really shocking thing is how close Singles gets to being wholesome. [June 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Something of a departure, sure, but it's nothing new. Falling awkwardly between action and strategy, it's unlikely to satisfy anyone other than rabidly obsessive fans of the character.
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nasty, brutish and short - and that's once you've got past the interface problems. Temple of Elemental Evil is a huge disappointment by any measure. [Christmas 2003, p.124]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Much as it saddens us, given the promise of seeing a 3D Ghost Trick, we pronounce this dead on arrival.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The game is also lumbered with a tragic split personality. On one hand, there’s a lot to do, and if you like the look of one of the initial five heroes you can do all of it for free with a little grinding. On the other hand, Marvel Heroes is so eager for you to spend – and so keen to extract the most out of your wallet when you do – that the price tag of the game in real-world terms can soon become astonishingly disproportionate to its quality.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the episodic development cycle all but demanding that structure and form be locked down in the first instalment, with content added thereafter, the series' future looks precarious at best. [June 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instant deaths, glitchy combat, uninspiring boss encounters and twitchy controls conspire to make this a below-par experience. If it wasn't for the occasional flashes of imagination and the familiarity and richness conveyed through the license then The Emperor's Tomb would be utterly forgettable. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    What Level-5 has created is a Frankenstein's monster. It's half singleplayer and half multiplayer, and both of them are half good: a compromise that leaves much of this game feeling soulless. To give WKC2 its due, it certainly improves on the original. But in trying to fix a poor template rather than start anew, it was probably doomed from the beginning.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Criticism has often been aimed at Hudson’s perpetual shrug of the shoulders as to how to milk new games from the same old buttons and analogue stick setup, yet here we find all-new motion controls and still no freshness. [Aug 2007, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a promising set-up, but one that’s flawed at nearly every level... You’re left with the overwhelming sensation of a Christmas present with no batteries to go in it. [Nov 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Access Games' take on the Monster Hunter formula attempts little beyond a straightforward recreation of that series' structure. [Mar 2011, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even at its best, when using the AV8R stick, Damage Inc feels clumsy, badly implemented and lacking in imagination. Mad Catz is unlikely to drive sales of its peripherals with a game in which every flight feels like work and every kill is, at best, a Pyrrhic victory in a tedious war.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The pretty basic minigames are bland, and the worst, such as Pot Luck, are based on blind, dumb chance. So are the best, sadly. They’re fun with four people, but what isn’t? [June 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's the cutest game we've seen in a while, but not nearly as good as it looks. [July 2010, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a game that makes you desperately want to feel like a Jedi, arcing your lightsaber across the screen, ducking under attacks, parrying counters and going in for the kill, but the subtlety just isn't there. [July 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Supernauts is both too limited to succeed as a town-builder and frustratingly restrictive as a creative tool, while its superhero interludes are disempowering and dull. [Sept 2014, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The irony is that in mining some unforgettable games, Curve has delivered a forgettable hodgepodge. [Mar 2011, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The components here function and rarely frustrate, but the machine they comprise only manufactures mediocrity. [Sept 2009, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In action the game is undeniably pretty, as long as you can stomach the monstrous camera. But beyond ther anime-inspired visuals, the action turgidly limps along without ever really engaging or entertaining. [May 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There’s a desperate lack of innovation on display here; nondescript levels based around ice caves, pyramids and inevitable Mayan temples. The boring locations exacerbate the sneaking feeling that the levels, which can easily take an hour or longer to finish, are simply too large. [JPN Import; Mar 2007, p.81]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A Witch's Tale is the teacher who says 'look, but don't touch.' [Sept 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A remake that's peculiarly of its time: a western-style, casual gaming aping of the Japanese shoot 'em up that's less homage than banal dilution, and the game sucks the life and vibrancy from its rich lineage. [July 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In-app purchases require delicate balancing, but with T-Coin bundles costing up to £69.99, and annual T-Club subscriptions available for £20.99 a year, EA could hardly be more obvious in letting you know that, as far as it's concerned, the 69p you paid to download the game was only the beginning.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Given that its bland combat is little enhanced by the ability to create cover, you suspect that the promises made for the technology have simply dug its own grave. [Dec 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There are some interesting ideas here, but in practice the game is overloaded with cut corners and blunting repetition. [Mar 2010, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a long, repetitive grind that fails to reward your efforts. [Sept 2012, p.100]
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A stunt-filled shooter in the vein (but not the league) of Stranglehold, it's a game that takes control away, reverts to how things used to be done, and judders between debilitating combat and haywire presentation. [May 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Saw
    To an industrious, moralising serial killer, Saw would seem an apt punishment for a life wasted on videogames. [Christmas 2009, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In music, bad tribute acts play pubs and weddings: in games, they sit at the top of the charts.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Approached free of any expectations higher than endless, mindless single-button mashing, the kenpu collecting and scenery spotting can provide some limited enjoyment in smaller doses, but approached as an epic quest, Key Of Heaven is one better left untaken. [Mar 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's no style in LowRider's low-riding - it's all about robotic timing, brute force and repetition over elegance. [March 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Firefights become more surreal than menacing when the worst-case scenario is of your fellow GIs having to catch their breath for a few seconds after being riddled with bullets. [Aug 2004, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    All the interaction it requires could be better executed, with equal intuition and far greater reliability, on a joypad with an analogue stick. [Nov 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For all its wit and swagger, Truckers is inescapably safety-conscious, rewarding the maintenance of a planned route and steady trajectory while more arresting notions - spontaneous risk, for example - fall from the back like poorly fastened cases of moonshine. [Sept 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    This is a perfectly awful conversion with poor controls, cumbersome combat, an antiquarian save system, inadequate maps and clumsy menu design. [Jan 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Perhaps EA would have done better to port a previous Wing Commander game in its totality rather than staple the name to a somewhat anaemic effort of an awkwardly inauthentic shape. [Oct 2007, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As a novelty, this is fine and will provide the odd fun moment. But unlike its endlessly replayable older brothers, you won’t be coming back. [Sept 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The Great Escape is saved by a few good set-pieces and the licence, but it's hard not to feel hard done by. Those willing to endure yet another stealth game could find their morale ebbing away by the end of this. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nintendo is claiming that The Conduit might attract Halo fans to its console, but this game isn’t fit to wait Master Chief’s table.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Once guns are acquired you feel less helpless, but the combat is awkward with enemies reacting poorly to hits and a compulsory manual reload that is ponderous beyond belief. In trying to make the game realistic, Headfirst has grievously shot itself in the foot. [Dec 2005, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the exceptions of deplorably bad cutscenes and haphazard signposting, there are few significant flaws here that a steadier gestation couldn't have resolved. [Aug 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The majority of insights are lost in a flood of banal dialogue and sluggish, shallow puzzles. [Aug 2009, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    That it feels so leaden despite its busyness, and fails to ignite despite all its gunpowder, is impossible to ignore. [May 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sure, Platinum has made flawed games before, but nothing nearly so bland or as uninspiring as this. [Christmas 2014, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instant deaths, glitchy combat, uninspiring boss encounters and twitchy controls conspire to make this a below-par experience. If it wasn't for the occasional flashes of imagination and the familiarity and richness conveyed through the license then The Emperor's Tomb would be utterly forgettable. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that's both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Bodycount's lack of consistent game design, flitting between arcadey action and a sub-par story-driven campaign, ultimately causes the game to misfire. The lesser parts of Bodycount's gameplay ultimately shout the loudest, drowning out its charms and distracting from the flourishes of inspired ideas.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's a fine line between graphic artistry and immaturity, and while Alter Echo makes an attempt at the former, it probably falls into the latter. The hues are creative enough, and the faux-naturelle structures suitably curled and alien but perhaps the real problem is that a world made from plastic would look as dull as it sounds. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As an interim project, it's good to see Criterion still interested in its most beloved IP, but it's just a shame there's so little of interest in the game itself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a high-profile demonstration of the fact that those who created this much-loved universe have lost their understanding of what originally made it so engaging. [Apr 2006, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You get the impression the only person who cares about Kain's legacy any more is the writer. The turgid battling lets an average game down. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    But it’s hard not to be disappointed that one of gaming’s true visions – of life’s multiplicity and constantly changing nature – should end up broadening itself by slumping into a worn groove of genre pieces and business dogma.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    While the basic mechanic shows promise, the game itself is purely mechanical, and predictably joyless as a result. [July 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The first Flipper wasn't a great piece of work, necessarily, but it had its own agenda and was powered by some pleasantly esoteric coding. The sequel, wonky and compromised, can't even claim that honour.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There’s a nugget of brilliance at the heart of Micro Machines that’s too simple and solid to crush, it’s true, but the laughable track editor, fussy interface and baffling load times certainly don’t justify this release. [Aug 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that’s both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that'll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A pretty but vapid experience. [Sept 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    An over-complicated take on a classic recipe.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unless you possess a particular zeal for collecting and upgrading slightly different weapons, the familiarity of slicing through yet another batch of spawning creatures soon grinds way at the thin gameplay. [June 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Somebody up there probably regards this as a trailblazing taste of high-concept, one-size-fits-all blockbuster games to come. Consider that, and know true Primal fear. [March 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The virtual interface does little to help players and, if anything, slows the game down as you wait for it to catch up with things that are already evident to players – such as victory, failure and boredom. [Dec 2007, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, no sooner does Geist suggest it can blossom into something fresh and exciting that it's undermined at every turn by a frustrating insistence on being nothing more than a mundane firstperson shooter. [Oct 2005, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's a fine line between graphic artistry and immaturity, and while Alter Echo makes an attempt at the former, it probably falls into the latter. The hues are creative enough, and the faux-naturelle structures suitably curled and alien but perhaps the real problem is that a world made from plastic would look as dull as it sounds. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    By keeping it real, the game retains many of the things that make navigating the real city more of a pain than a pleasure: countless faceless skyscrapers don’t make for memorable landmarks, and facing the wrong way down a jammed one-way street when you’re in a hurry to get somewhere is the sort of challenge few will relish. [Jan 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Certainly, releasing it so close to Halo Wars suggests deliberate commercial suicide - that it’s genuinely progressive ideas will be ignored and lost as a result is a minor tragedy. [Apr 2009, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A stunt-filled shooter in the vein (but not the league) of Stranglehold, it's a game that takes control away, reverts to how things used to be done, and judders between debilitating combat and haywire presentation. [May 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Jett Rocket's mistakes remind us of the N64 days, when developers were feeling their way through Nintendo's brave new 3D world. [Aug 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s simply baffling that it manages to make so many mistakes within such a well-worn template.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a shame, but LifeLine is just poorly implemented. With the laborious pacing complicated by the dodgy voice-recognition, flaws in the gimmicky technology negate what satisfying moments are on offer here. [May 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You'll trudge endlessly around the forest, cursing your protagonist's languid walk speed as you wander from one already visited landmark to the next in the vague hope of triggering the next bit of scripting in a narrative which goes out of its way to confuse the player.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's the Excitebots themselves that disappoint most, so drearily conceived that they make the predecessor's humble trucks look like flaming DeLoreans. [July 2009, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The bottom line is that Rise Of Nightmares isn't as engaging or exciting as AM1's established brand. It's also too adult in its content to appeal to the younger users who might enjoy its gimmicky use of Kinect.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It says a lot that a dancing game is the best thing on offer in this muddled, cynical package. For the most part, Kinect Star Wars feels ill-conceived: kids will be bored, and adults will be embarrassed.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Judged solely on its Balance Board controls, Skate It comes up little short of unplayable thanks to a bewildering complexity. [Jan 2009, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine