Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 6,016 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 All the Real Girls
Lowest review score: 0 What the #$*! Do We (K)now!?
Score distribution:
6016 movie reviews
  1. Graham makes the coming-out dithering bearable, but not before she has jumped through hoops of contrivance.
  2. As Carrie might type on her laptop while giving one of her girly little shrugs, When did Sex and the City become so long and mean so little?
  3. Brooks guards the movie from overheating in a surfeit of warmedy.
  4. It's a solemnly preposterous piece of designer revenge pulp, with actors who stand around bathed in red and blue light like David Lynch mannequins in between scenes of torture and murder.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    By now, we’ve come to expect certain things in movies adapted from Stephen King novels: brooding misanthropy, a pound or two of viscera, and — perhaps most horrifying of all — Hollywood actors delivering their lines with bad Maine accents. Needful Things delivers on said expectations, no more, no less.
  5. Anderson's adaptation is heavy on production numbers in which jingles come to life and light on conveying any real feelings of Eisenhower-era darkness the prizewinner herself might have felt during her decades of marriage to an abusive, drunken man.
  6. As an expat redneck, I recognize the deep, dumb need of every group for its own culturally customized minstrel show. Larry, a junker ''star'' vehicle run on arse wind and fan love, fills that niche.
  7. Myself, I felt victimized by the stereotype shtick of reliably grating Rob Schneider as a Canadian-Japanese wedding-chapel minister from SNL castoff hell. But maybe that's just because this movie encourages sensitivity by hitting everyone over the head with its humor hammer.
  8. An intermittently fun, but overexcited and predictable mish-mash.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    With Walken around, hair up high, of course there are fleeting moments of fascinating weirdness, but even then, you're still moderately embarrassed for the cast.
  9. It wants to be "Good Will Hunting" set in the land of "Entourage," but its bummed-out touchy-feeliness is every bit as concocted as its overly jaded showbiz corruption.
  10. Peculiarly coy feminine-empowerment fable.
  11. The one bit of good news is that the first Gambler is currently streaming on Netflix. Do yourself a favor and watch that one instead.
  12. The only real magic in The Lake House is that Kate and Alex have never heard of e-mail.
  13. Reeves is a stiff dancer and he delivers his lines in a full leather jacket monotone.
  14. The surreal thing is, Zac Efron can't do despair.
  15. An inert screwball cartoon, a celebration of monogamy as fashion statement.
  16. Within the pungent field of other wide-release scare jobs and films derived from cardboard-based time-killers for kids, Ouija stacks up relatively well, thanks to its look and a confident performance by Cooke.
  17. When the children in Carpenter’s Village flash their glowing eyes, hypnotizing the hapless grown-ups into committing a series of increasingly lurid suicides, the kids don’t seem much more bizarre — or frightening — than your average 10-year-old Nintendo freak.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    The movie butts up against the director's newfound pretensions -- pseudo-philosophical voice-over, psychobabble, faux-art-film plotting -- and turns incomprehensible.
  18. Strands Cedric the Entertainer behind the wheel and forces him to motor a collection of laugh-and-learn wacky situations by sheer force of his outsize charm.
  19. The film doesn’t seem particularly interested in grappling with any of those issues beyond the most superficial level.
  20. The lame-o aspects of the whole campy setup are still lame-o.
  21. The Limits of Control, even with its flow of star cameos (Tilda Swinton, Gael García Bernal, a frenetic Bill Murray), is a listless long pause that rarely refreshes.
  22. Epps has a nicely beaten charm to him -- among the leads, he alone looks like he knows what a trip to the moon costs.
  23. Earnestly ersatz down to every spangle, dance move, plot turn, and line of hokum dialogue, Burlesque is a showbiz pic for these American Idol times - a time when we agree to pretend that mediocre mimicry of better artists is good enough to keep us entertained. We agree to pretend that quality is in the eye and ear of the undemanding beholder.
  24. This underworld fairy tale is so soggy and sentimental it's like a new genre: Hallmark noir.
  25. Writer-director Steven Zaillian's version stultifies, especially when compared with Robert Rossen's fiery 1949 Oscar winner. How could such dullness defeat the retelling, when Willie Stark is one of the most vivid characters in 20th-century American popular culture?
  26. The movie is rotten the way that only a denatured made-for-export slice of Gallic nostalgia can be.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    As if to make up for the predictable main plot, The Perfect Match is bogged down with a slew of uninteresting B-stories.

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